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Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 


Tr-**-. 







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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 

London, Tuesday, November 15, 1994 



No. 34,746 



Asians Look to U.S. 
For Trade Leadership 






^ ^ . nn/VTiAC r. ■ Inn Hollander/ Reuters 

j Members of (be Palestinian f un d am entalist group home of a 21-year-old suicide bomber on a bievefe who detonated a bomb ffcif 

Islamic Jihad at a rally Monday at winch a Jihad leader spoke about killed three Israeli soldiers on Friday. Jihad activists have begun wearing 
continuing the “struggle of kiffing Israelis.” The rally was held outside the white, the color of the cloth Muslims use to wrap bodies for buriaL Page 5. 


Security Council Refuses to Lift Iraq Sanctions 


Compiled by Oar Staff From Dapautm 

UNITED NATIONS, New York — The 
Security Council refused Monday to lift 
economic sanctions on Iraq. 

The 15-nation council rejected Iraq's 
. claim that it has met conditions to lift an 
'Ol embargo and other sanctions imposed 
lister its 1990 invasion of Kuwait, said 
Madeleine K. Albright, U.S. represen ta- 
tive to the UN. . . 

The British UN ambassador. Sir David 
t Hannay, said there was no dissent in the 
- -y . r5-ioeinb« ccurifcil about retaining die 
. • f ' sanctions, imposed nrresponse to, Iraq’s 
; ‘ invasion of Kuwait, v 


“There was no dissent at all,” be said. 
“It was the view of all members who spoke 
— and I think everybody in the council 
spoke — that the conditions did not exist 
for changing the sanctions," Sir David 
said. 

He said there was a “very broad wel- 
come” in the council for a letter received 
from the Iraqi deputy prime minister, 
Tariq Aziz, formally recognizing the inde- • 
pen den ce of Kuwait as demarcated by a 
UN panel. 

The sanctions were extended after the 
war to force Iraq to help destroy its weap- 


ons of mass destruction and to drop claims 
to Kuwaiti. 

Iraq contends shortages caused by the 
sanctions are inflicting suffering' and 
death. Washington and its allies say Iraq 
can afford food and medicine for its peo- 
ple but is aggravating their suffering as a 
propaganda ploy. 

Iraq has refused a chance to seli oil 
worth Sl.6 billion under UN supervision 
to pay for food and medicine. 

Mrs. .Albright also said Iraq ha> asked 
forhunanitarian exemptions from the U\' 
embargo to import fur coats, brass beds, 
marble tiling, TVs and VCRs. 


She told the council that President Sad- 
dam Hussein “has spent half a billion 
dollars on building literally dozens of opu- 
lent new palaces for the exclusive use of his 
family.” according to a U.S. statement. 
(Page 5.) 

In a meeting with Mrs. AJbrigbt that 
lasted just two minutes. Mr. Aziz argued 


that Iraq had met the conditions for lifting 
sanctions by recognizing the new UN- 
drawn Kuwaiti border. 

“The council has imposed sanctions on 
Iraq for certain reasons and those reasons 
do not exist any more.” Mr. Aziz said 
afterward. f AP. Reuters) 


Embassy Sitrln 
Forces Issue of 
Human Rights 

By Paul Blustein 
and Thomas W. Lippman 

Washington Post Service 

JAKARTA — President Bill Clinton 
found himself caught in an awkward spot 
on Monday, trying to advance a major 
trade initiative with some of the world's 
most authoritarian regimes without ap- 
pearing callous about h uman rights. 

Mr. Clinton, who came to the summit 
meeting of Asia-Pacific nations here boast- 
ing that his mission would promote U.S. 
exports in the world's fastest-growing re- 
gion, was forced to confront the human- 
rights question after widely publicized 
demonstrations by protesters favoring in- 
dependence for the Indonesian-occupied 
territory of East Timor. 

The controversy is threatening to divert 
attention from the trip's centerpiece, 
scheduled for unveiling Tuesday — a dec- 
laration by the 18 members of the Asia- 
Pacific Economic Cooperation forum 
pledging to establish free trade in the re- 
gion by the early years of the next century. 

Administration officials argued that the 
free-trade proposal would boost human 
rights in countries like Indonesia and Chi- 
na by spurring economic growth and help- 
ing to build a democracy-minded middle 
class. Bnt that message whs hard to convey 
amid television broadcasts showing rioters 
battling policemen, in Dili. East Timor’s 
capita] city, and Timorese students barri- 
caded in the U.S. Embassy, pleading for 
“the world's only superpower to help end 
Indonesia's rule over their territory. 

[The 29 protesters in the U.S. Embassy 
submitted a petition to officials Monday 
calling for the release of about 100 East 
Timorese arrested over the weekend in 
Jakarta and in Dili, Agence France-Presse 
reported. They also demanded the release 
of the jailed resistance leader, Jose Xanana 
Gusmao, so he could take part in talks with 
Jakarta authorities. .And they' demanded 
that the U.S. government help them obtain 
political asylum in Portugal. 

[Mr. Ciiruon said that iHe United States 
See TIMOR, Page 4 


Berlusconi Wins Key Vote 
In Battle of the Budget 




Roam 

ROME— Prime Minister Silvio Berlus- 
coni of Italy won a vote of confidence in 
the Chamber of Deputies on Monday on a 
key revenue- raising measure in its 1995 
budget. . r _ 

The vote; on an amnesty in the budget 
bill for Italians guilty of filial budding 
work in exchange for a single payment, 
was 321 to 134. 

Opposition filibustering delayed the 
VQtftby several hours and many opposition 
.deputies boycotted the ballot 

Ttse' 1995 budget, opposed by trade 
unions that held a protest Saturday attend- 
ed by a million people, aims to reduce next 
yearis deficit by some 48 trillion tire ($30 
biffion)thjough a mix of spending cuts and 
revenue increases, mainly in the areas of 
health bare and pensions. 
x.-Six trillion lire of the extra revenue is 
due to. come from the measure that Mr. 
BerlnscbaLmade.a confidence issue. 

Mr. Berlusconi submitted the confi- 
dence vote cm tile building pardon to block 
some 250 amendments that had threatened 
to- hold up the budget’s passage through 
Ptttiament. 

. If was the first time he had resorted to 


such a tactic, but the prime minister gave 
notice on Monday that his center-right 
coalition would do it again whenever it 
thought the budget was in danger. 

“Tills is not an act of weakness or of 
arrogance but an act of respect toward 
voters who elected this government.” 

Before the vote, dozens of members of 
the leftist Progressives bloc asked to ad- 
dress the Chamber of Deputies in a tactic 
designed to hold up proceedings for hours. 

Accusing Mr. Berlusconi of riding 
roughshod over Parliament, they vowed to 
wreck passage of the entire budget if the 
government resorted to confidence votes 
on other provisions, including bitterly con- 
tested pension reforms. 

- “Our stand on this confidence vote 
should serve as a warning,” Famiano Cru- 
caanelli, of the hard-line Communist Re- 
foundation Party, said on the floor. “This 
arbitrariness and arrogance must stop.” 

- Luigi Berlinguer, the Progressives par- 
liamentary leader, said his group would 
leave the chamber before the vote. “We 
will return to our seats when the rales are 
restored," he said. 

By law. Parliament must approve the 
budget by the end of the year. 


In U.S., a Peculiar War Cry 

Militias’ on Guard Against Washington 

. By Keith Schneider 

New York Tin** Sana 
BRUTUS, Michigan —On a 

wedcendmoniingnearthistosraat^^P 
of Lake Michigan, some 
group caffing itself the Michigan 
haw convened amid the 
practice military techniques many long 

^AMwgh the training is 
andSeathinS ragged 

sss»« is 

here in Emmet County, ^organization 
has started chapters, or brigades. 


ft 


Newsstand Pricey 


OenmcriclAWaKr. g men .;.. T ^00 Riols 

Finland. — U P.M. .gjjjjj; b .qq Rkata 

Gibraltar.. — £0-55 irefondfl R £ LW 

Great Britain JE 0^5 gaydi Arabia 9.00 R 
-Eflypt.’«~e.P- 5000 South Africa .....Rd 

Jordan^. 1 J D UAE. 

tromm K. SH. ISO U.S. Mil. (Eur.)S I.W 
KSZ^i»Fils Zimbabwe. ZrniAM.00 


throughout Michigan, said Ray Southwell, 
the group’s information officer. 

Similar groups, which all call themselves 
militias, have sprung up in at least 20 
states, from Florida to Washington State, 
say civil liberties and research organiza- 
tions that track the movement. 

What they have in common is opposi- 
tion to gun control. But most of them also 
harbor far-fetched conspiracy theories that 
the federal government wants to utterly 
control the lives of citizens and will crush 
those who resist, by means up to and 
including using United Nations troops 
with old Soviet miliiary equipment. They 
are, by and large, all-white groups. 

The Justice Department says it does not 
monitor the so-called militia movement, 
and the civil liberties organizations that 
trade It say it is impossible to determine 
how many people are involved. But, the 
experts contend, -the numbers are not as 
important as what the movement repre- 
sents: alienation so acute among a small 
group of Americans that they are arming 
themselves against what they see as an 
apocalyptic takeover. 

The mili tia movement is a widespread 
phenomenon, involving people in every 
region of the country. Linked together by 

See MILITIA, Page 4 


Kiosk 


U.S.Wffl Stick 
To Haiti Schedule 

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Clinton 
administration plans no acceleration in 
the troop withdrawal from Haiti despite 
Republican wishes. Defense Secretary 
William J. Perry said Monday. 

“They will not all be out by Thanks- 
giving by a long shot,” Mr. Perry said. 
“Our plan, as we’ve announced before, is 
to reduce to about 9,000 troops in Haiti 
by the end of the month,” the secretary 
added. “There will be further reductions 
in December.” 

Fresh Talks on Ulster 

LONDON (AFP) — Prime Minister 
John Major said Monday that his gov- 
ernment hoped to start talks on North- 
ern Ireland with representatives of loyal- 
ist paramilitary forces by the end of the 
year. 

His announcement comes five weeks 
after the Ulster loyalists declared a 
cease-fire, and two-and-a-half months 
after the Irish Republican Army called a 
cessation. 


Book Review 
Chess 
Crossword 
Weather 


Page 8. 
Page 8. 
Page 19. 
Page 20. 


T rib Index 



ft* 

]Ci 3829.73 

ThFOollar 


MwXort. 


Moactose 


previous dose 


DM 


1.5446 


15313 



Pound 


1.5865 


1.5969 


Yen 


9830 


97.725 


Ff 


5.3095 


5364 


Ourta Pbhiu/RcuKn 

INAUGURAL RUN — A high-speed train leaving Paris for London on 
Monday on its first under-the-Channe! trip for paying passengers. Page 2. 


Mideast Peace Seises Sunny Beachhead 


By John Lancaster 

Washington Poet Scnriee 

' SHARM EL SHEIKH, Egypt— Watch 
out, Portofino and St- Tropez: here comes 
the “Red Sea Riviera." 

There are differences, of course. Here on 
Egypt’s Singj Peninsula, the landscape is 
mostly desert, security checkpoints 
abound, and beaches are marked with 
signs prohibiting topless sunbathing, “in 
accordance with Egyptian law." 

But as peace spreads across the Middle 
East, Egypt, 'Jordan and Israel are sharing 
proposals to tap the vast tourism potential 
of their common coast, a snorkeler's para- 
dise where tropical reefs swarm with some 
of the world’s most dazzling varieties of 
fish. 

More than just a clever marketing gim- 


mick, the still-evolving blueprint embraces 
transportation links, international mari- 
nas, joint protection of natural areas — 
even a proposal for cross-border windsurf- 
ing. 

“We are talking about making it one 
agglomeration, to establish complemen- 
tary activities,” said Adel Rady, technical 
director for Egypt’s Tourist Development 
Authority. “None of this would have been 
possible unless there was a peaceful envi- 
ronment” 

But some fear the boom could be 
ephemeral. 

Despite the recent peace treaty between 
Israel and Jordan — Israel and Egypt 
made peace in 1979 — terrorism and polit- 
ical instability continue lo cast long shad- 
ows on the region, causing jitters in a 


tourism industry notoriously sensitive to 
both. 

Even more ominous, perhaps, are grow- 
ing environmental threats to the delicate 
living reef. With financial help from the 
European Union, Egypt has embarked on 
a race against time to establish parks and 
protected coastal zones in a rare attempt to 
balance preservation with the pressing eco- 
nomic needs or a Third World country. 

“If the government doesn’t move fast, 
this will all die here," said Annatina Pin- 
osch, manager of the M oven pick Hotel in 
Sharm el Sheikh’s Naama Bay, where the 
number of hotels has tripled in the last 
four years. “The corals we are selling in 
Europe — this will go.” 

Not long ago, an integrated tourist zone 

See SINAI, Page 4 


Regional Pact 
Needs GATT to 
Work , They Say 

By Michael Richardson 

Imcnuuimal Herald Tribune 

JAKARTA — Asian and Pacific leaders 
are expected to endorse a historic free- 
trade accord on Tuesday, bnt they will fink 
its success to ratification by the United 
Stales and other major economic powers 
of the GATT worid trade pact, officials 
said Monday. 

Such a move would strengthen the band 
of President Bill Clinton as he seeks sup- 
port from a Republican-controlled Con- 
gress in a critical vote on the global Uru- 
guay Round trade accord negotiated by 
more than 1 00 countries under the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

Failure to ratify the Uruguay Round 
accord, a U.S. official warned Monday, - 
could divide the world into three trade 
blocs centered in Europe, the Americas 
and Asia. 

After talks with President Jiang Zemin 
of China, Prime Minister Tomiichi Mur- 
ay&ma of Japan. President Kim Young 
Sam of South Korea and Prime Minister 
Paul Keating of Australia, Mr. Clinton 
said that in each of the meetings there was 
“strong agreement that the early ratifica- 
tion of GATT would be absolutely essen- 
tial” to maintain global economic growth 
and expanding trade. 

“It was clear to me that the rest of the 
world is looking to the United States for 
leadership on this issue,” he said. 

Mr. Clinton said he believed discussions 
Tuesday among leaders of the 18 members 
of APEC, the Asia- Pacific Economic Co- 
operation forum, “will allow us to take a 
critical step forward toward free and open 
trade throughout the region." The infor- 
mal summit meeting will take place in the 
Indonesian dry of Bogor. 

The APEC leaders met over a working 
dinner on Monday in Jakarta to discuss 
their planned declaration at Bogor. 

Officials said that on Tuesday, the lead- 
ers would probably announce a plan to 
adopt free and open trade in the Ada- 
Pacific region by 2020 at the blest for 
developing countries and by 2010 for de- 
veloped and newly industrial i zing econo- 
mies. 

The members of APEC are Australia, 
Brunei, Canada. Chile. China, Hong 
Kong. Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia. Mexi- 
co, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, the 
Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Tai- 
wan, Thailand and the United States. They 
account for half of worid production and 
around 45 pereent of global trade. 

Officials said APEC leaders were ex- 
pected to call for the liberalization pro- 
gram to start in 1995 through implementa- 
tion of agreements made under the 
Uruguay Round of GATT. 

Evidently picking up on this theme, Mr. 
Clinton noted that one third of U.S ex- 
ports already went to the Asia-Pacific re- 

See APEC Pag© A 


Yeltsin Tells 
His Generals: 
Shape Up Army 

By Steven Erlanger 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Speaking on Monday to 
lop military commanders, President Boris 
N. Yeltsin expressed unhappiness with 
their work, urged greater miH 


itary readi- 
ness' and said he expected new frictions 
with the United States under a Congress 
controlled by the Republican Party. 

“After the victory of conservatives at the 
UJS. midterm election we can expect a 
certain toughening of the VS. stand in 
foreign policy ana military issues,” Mr. 
Yeltsin said. He said the government 
should establish closer ties to the Republi- 
cans “to balance our relations." 

But he concentrated on miliiary matters, 
at a delicate time for the armed forces, 
which have been shaken by scandal, with 
persistent allegations of corruption in the 
press. 

The job of the defense minister, General 
Pavel S. Grachev, is thought to be on Lhe 
line after Mr. Yeltsin dismissed one of his 
deputies, General Matvei P. Burlakov. The 
former commander of Soviet troops in 
Eastern Germany, General Burlakov is al- 
leged to have profited by the illegal sale of 
fuel, arms and real estate during their with- 
drawal. 

General Grachev sat with Mr. Yeltsin, 
and the two exchanged pleasantries, as 
they did during the final of the Kremlin 
Cup tennis tournament on Sunday. Mr. 
Yeltsin wants to keep General Grachev, 
who has been loyal and has tried to down- 
size the military and redefine its doctrine 
in better keeping with a new, more demo- 
cratic Russia. 

Bui in his address, Mr. Yeltsin 
that more personnel changes were to come 
by speaking so openly about the shortcom- 
ings of the military command. And he said 
he was scheduling separate meetings with 
the commanders of the various services 
within the armed forces. 

Mr. Yeltsin said that commanders were 
not taking full responsibility for their sol- 

See RUSSIA, Page 4 


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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


EU Hails Swedish Vote, but Now Worries About the Blast 


BRIEFS 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS — The European 


Union celebrated tbe membership en- 
dorsement of Swedish voters on M en- 


dorsement of Swedish voters on Mon- 
day, but the festive atmosphere may 
not last long. 

With northern enlargement effec- 
tively ensured, Europe's leaders now 
turn their sights to the much more 
complex task of embracing the fledg- 
ling democracies of Eastern Europe, a 
job that wfll dominate the EU agenda 
through the end of the decade. 

That will require a far-reaching ex- 
amination of the bloc's governing pro- 
cedures, including the limiting or 
scrapping of the national veto, at a 


inference starting in 1996. That is a 
uospect that is already polarizing 
'ranee as next spring’s presidential 


election approaches and that threatens 
to isolate Britain from its partners. 

“It will become ever more apparent 
that our derision-making process is 
too cumbersome,” a German diplomat 
said. “We have to do something about 
it." 

In addition, tbe Union will have to* 
agree on a drastic overhaul of the farm 
and development subsidies that make 
up the vast bulk of EU spending if it is 
to afford membership for the poorer 
Eastern neighbors. 

Still, officials were ebullient Mon- 
day after Swedes followed voters in 
Austria and Finland in approving EU 
.membership. The verdict “once agai n 
'confirms the great attractiveness of 
united Europe," said the German 
chancellor, Helmut Kohl 

Business leaders had campaigned 


vigorously for a “yes” vote, saying EU 
membership was vital to maintain 
Sweden's attractiveness for invest- 
ment Financial markets endorsed that 
view on Monday as the Swedish stocks 
jumped more than 2 percent interest 
rates declined and the krona surged 
more than 1 percent to 4.6840 Deut- 
sche marks. 

The result also boosted prospects 
that voters in Norway would approve 
membership on Nov. 28. Polls show 
that Norwegians, who rejected mem- 
bership in 1972, would be inclined to 
do so again but would split evenly after 
a Swedish “yes." 

Prime Minister GrO Harlem Brundt- 
land urged voters on Monday to follow 
their neighbors rather than standing 


isolated on the doorstep of Europe, 
while the Center Party leader, Anne 


Lahnstrin, head of the “no" campaign, 
warned against government “scare tac- 
tics.” , 

EU officials said a rejection in Nor- 
way would not be too damaging or 
surprising, given the country’s fierce 
independence. In contrast, the Swed- 
ish vote was pivotal because the coun- 
try is the richest, most populous and 
most influential diplomatically of the 
four applicants. 

The internal reforms needed to pre- 
pare the Union for taking on as many 
as 10 Eastern countries are already, 
proving divisive, though. Karl Lamers, 
a member of tbe Bundestag and a 
confidant of Mr. Kohl's, has caused a 
'stir by calling for a core group of 
countries led by Germany, France and 
tbe Benelux nations to blaze a trail of 
deeper integration, including a single 


currency, even as the Union member- 
ship ejqmnds. 

In France, meanwhile, Jacques 
Chirac, the GauDist presidential candi- 
date, has appealed to EU skeptics by 
callmg for a referendum before adopt- 
ing a single currency. 

■ No French Referendum 

European Affairs Minister Alain 
Lamassoure ruled out the prospect of a 
French referendum on European mon- 
etary union on Monday but said a 
plebiscite on a new treaty widening the 
Union to the East was likely, Reuters 
reported from Paris. 

Asked on Radio Monte Carlo if. 
France's center-right government ex- 
pected a referendum before accepting 
a sin gle currency, Mr. lamassoure re- 
plied: “This problem is already set- 
tled.” 


French Agency Holds Protest in Za^ 


NAIROBI (Reuters) — The French- agency Doctors 'WitW. 
Borders stopped all operations on Monday in Rwandan refe* 
camps around the eastern Zairian town of Bukavu. 6 

The agency said it wanted to protest against deierxoraijmj 
security m tbe Bukavu camps and said that unless interna^J 
action, was taken it would be fenced to withdraw all remaiaap 
teams from Zaire. 


“In Bukavu the situation has deteriorated to such an extent tw 
It now ethically impossible for Doctors Without Bardot to 
continue aiding and -abetting the perpetrators of the Rwanda 
genocide,” the French medical aid agency said in a staien^ 
Members of the former Rwandan authorities, military^ 
mili t ia s exert total control over tens of thousands of riyuang^ 
the camps in Bukavu,” the agency said. 


Bosnian Serb Attack 
Nears Croatia Border 


T J ^ 

11 J Warnings of Intervention Over Bihac 


' Compiled by Otr Staff From Dtspeacha 
■ SARAJEVO, Bosnia- Herze- 
govina — Serbs rolling back 
gains by the government army 
moved closer to the Croatian 
border Monday, provoking a 
warning by Croatia that it was 
considering military interven- 
tion in Bosnia. 

• United Nations officials 
monitoring the fighting in the 
Bihac pocket in extreme north- 
west Croatia said Bosnian Ser- 
bian troops over the past few 
Idays have regain ed SO percent 
of the territory in the region lost 
to the mostly Muslim govern- 
ment army in recent weeks. 

A UN spokesman, Major 
Herv6 Gourmdon, spoke of 
firefights 4 kilometers (2.3 
miles) east of the Bihac city cen- 
ter, just 10 kilometers east of 
the Croatian border. 

Government troops defend- 
ing Bihac are sandwiched be- 
tween Bosnian Serbian troops 
and rebel Serbs in Croatia to 
tbe north and west who have 
provided artillery cover to their 
Bosnian Serbian brethren. 

Croatian officials have seized 
on the involvement of rebel 
Serbs on Croatian territory in 
tbe Bihac fighting. Croatia's 
government is mcreasingly frus- 
trated at the failure of UN-me- 
diated talks to return control of 
the one-third of Croatia cap- 
tured by the rebel Serbs in 1991 
and might use the turmoil to 
attach, the Serbs, 
i The clearest warning of pos- 
sible Croatian military Involve- 
ment was given Monday by 
Darko Bekic, Croatia's ambas- 
sador to the Conference on Se- 
curity and Cooperation in Eu- 
rope. Mr. Bekic was quoted by 
Croatia’s HINA news agency as 
saying that if Bihac falls, “we 
will be forced to assist neigh- 
boring Bosnia-Herzegovina." 

Early this month, a Mustim- 
Bosnian Croatian alliance cap- 
tured the city of Kupres, hand- 
ing Serbs their worst defeat 


since they went to war in 1992 
after Bosnia seceded from Yu- 
goslavia. The Serbs are now re- 
sponding. 

Although Bosnian Serbian 
forces pressed ahead with their 
counterattack on Bihac, UN 
peacekeepers said they would 
not intervene to halt the on- 
slaught around a designated 
“safe area.” 

The Security Council met in 
emergency session on Sunday 
and condemned the latest fight- 


ing there, expressing particular 
concern over the role of the 


concern over the role of the 
Croatian Serbs. 

But the Bosnian prime minis- 
ter, Haris Sflajdzic, on Monday 
called the UN statement 
“meaningless” and urged the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation to cany out air strikes to 
stop attacks by Bosnian Serbian 
forces and rebel Serbs in Cro- 
atia. 

“They should order NATO 
air strikes against Serb posi- 
tions — not one-and-a-half 
bombs but a real air strike," Mr. 
Silajdzic said during a visit to 
London. Now, he said, the 
Serbs were attacking “across all 
borders.” 

The UN special representa- 
tive in the former Yugoslavia, 
Yasu5hi Akashi, has played 
down any suggestion that tbe 
United Nations Protection 
Force might step in around Bi- 
hac. 

Earlier Monday, Lieutenant 
Colonel Tim Spicer, a UN 
spokesman, warned Serbs 
against crossing the Una River, 
which forms the border of the 
Bihac pocket. Such a move 
would be a violation of the 
“safe area." 

NATO air strikes could be 
ordered to protect “safe areas,” 
as has been done in the past 

Major Gourmelon said the 
Bihac area suffered heavy Ser- 
bian shelling overnight. He sin- 



Jobs and Crime and EU Occupy Kohl 

BONN (Combined Dispatches) — Chancellor Helmut K^hl 
unveiled a legislative program Monday that he hopes will keep fafe 
weakened coalition government from collapsing before its foor 
years are up. 

Mr. Kohl listed job creation, crime fighting and theeastwani 
expansion of the European Union among its top priorities. 

The Bundestag, the lower house of Parliament, is scheduled to 
vote Tuesday on whether to confirm Mr. Kohl as chancellor. 


' (AP.Reuie wj 

Lawmakers Scuffle in Islamabad 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (AP) — Opposition lawmakers fought 
with government supporters and shouted down President Farooq 
Leghari during his state of the union address in Parliament ou- 
Monday. 

A cordon of police moved quickly to protea the president and 
Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto as opponents pushed toward thjf- 
front of the National Assembly. Outsideihe hul, Bhutto support? 
ers wrestled with opponents. Police Officers brake up fights in 
corridors, stairwells and in the lobby. ‘At least three opposition 
lawmakers were injured. . y 


Delors Vows Decision by Christmas 

PARIS (AFP) — The outgoing head of the European Union, 
J accrues Detects, said Monday that he would make dear “before 
Christmas" his decision on whether to run in the French presiden- 
tial election in May. '■■■■■■■ 

Mr. Delors, who is to step down on Jan. 26,' said on French 
radio that if he opted to be a candidate he would make no formal 
announcement until after that date. But he said that “if I decided 
not to ran, then I would give notice of this well before Jan. 25.” He 
added: “It will be before Christinas.” 


Khmer Rouge Wams OS Westerners 


Anja Nicdringbaia/Ageixe Fnmoc-Prenc 

Soldiers of the Bosnian government awaiting orders Monday at an observation post on Mount I gman near Sarajevo. 


NATO Chief Will Hold Talks in U.S. on Embargo 


PHNOM PENH (AP) — The Khmer Rouge on Monday 
warned Westerners,, three of whom were killed recently by the 
guerrilla group, not to risk their lives by working in Cambodia. 

The statement was carried by tbe clandestine radio of the 
guerrillas, who are battling the central government. It specifically 
warned nationals of die United States, France and Australia. 

Reacting to the broadcast. Prince Norodom Ranariddh, one of 
the government's two prime ministers, expressed hope that the 


f uemllas would not continue to threaten foreigners who work for 
tunanitarian organizations in Cambodia. 


Reuters 

NOORDWUK, Netherlands — NA- 
TO's secretary-general, Willy Claes, will 
fly to the United States this week for 
high-level talks on President Bill Clin- 
ton’s decision to stop enforcing an arms 
embargo against Bosnian Muslims. 

European diplomats said Mr. Claes 
would go to New York on Wednesday 
and meet with the United Nations secre- 
tary-general, Butros Butros Ghali, on 
Thursday before moving 6ti to Washing- 


ton for talks with senior administration 
officials. 

A North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
source said Mr. Claes would be prepared 
to stay in America until early next week 
to meet Mr. Clinton personally to dis- 
cuss the move, which has dismayed NA- 
TO's European partners. 

Mr. Clinton is currently on a tour of 
Asian countries and it was not immedi- 
ately dear if he would be able to meet 
with Mr. Claes. 


A Dutch Foreign Ministry spokesman 
stressed that tbe U.S. move to withdraw 
from a naval blockade in the Adriatic 
would have little impact militarily. 

Britain joined France in calling for an 
urgent meeting of the so-called “contact 
group” on Bosnia — made up of the 
United States, Germany, Britain, France 
and Russia — to discuss the issue. 

Both countries have said they will pull 
their peacekeepers out . of the former Yu- . , 
goslaviaff the ar^ns embargo 'cOBapses. ' 


TRAVEL UPDATE 


- ■■ >3 V . : .. i. :... •. 

Pope Urges Church to Atone for Errors 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Times Service 


atoning for transgressions, in- saries assert, did nothing to 
duding what he termed “acqui- speak out against the Holo- 


ROME — Pope John Paul II 
urged the Roman Catholic 


escence” in human rights caust, an accusation the church 
abuses under the totalitarian re- denies by saying it acted covert- 


gled out the village of Orljanci Church on Monday to mark the 


of Kupres, hand- just south of Bihac. 

eir worst defeat (AP. Reuters) 


third millenium of Christianity 
starting, in the year 2000, by 


gimes of the 20th century. ly to shield Jews from Nazi per- 
AI though in uncertain health secul * on - 


at the age of 74, the Pope also The Spanish Inquisition was 


a P r ®P ar ' n 8 also a period marked by the 
for The Great Jubilee” that he forced conversion of Jews and 


Monday 

MONDAY SPORTS 


was counting on being part of the persecution of heretics that 
the celebrations, just over five the Pope seemed to be evoking 


years hence, by embarking on a when he spoke in his 71-page 

mllYrrmOlta tn flia LJ aL. I 3 « - - L ~ .. 1 ° 


pilgrimage to the Holy Land, letter Monday of “acquiescence 

The Hmv* C i>llm ucnuH In - __ • . - 


The Pope s letter seemed to given, especially in certain cen- 
echo suggestions he made in turies, to intolerance and even 


May that the church should the use of violence in the service 
atone for errors over the past 0 f truth." 


2,000 years as it looks forward . , , _ 

to the next miUenium. ™ modem times, the Pope 

wu-i u j-j . said: “How can we not lament 

While he did not go into de- the lack of discernment, which 
taiutne error most commonly at times became even acquies- 


of fundamental human rights 
by totalitarian regimes?” 

The 20th century, he said, 
had been “scarred by the first 
and second world wars, by the 
experience of concentration 
camps and by horrendous mas- 
sacres.” 

The thrust of the papal letter 
was to ascribe blame for such 
“acquiescence” to individuals 
rather than the Vatican as an 
institution. However, he said, 
historical circumstances did 
“not exonerate the church from 
the obligation to express pro- 
found regret for the weakness 
of so many of her sons and 
daughters who sullied her face.'* 

The question of atonement 


Warning on Some Commuter Flighted 

WASHINGTON (AP) — An international association of air- 
craft passengers advised its members on Monday to avoid flying 
on small regional and commuter aircraft. 

“Commuter aircraft with under 31 seats are the real hazard,” 1 
-warned David Stempler, executive director tif the-toteraational 
Airline Passengers Association. Mr. Stumpier urged numbers of 
the association who are booking flights to ask what type of plane 
they will fly and, if it is a small one, ask to be placed on a flight 
with a larger craft. 

• Tbe association reported that during I5years therehadbeen29 
fatal accidents involving aircraft with less than 31 seats and just 
one involving a regional plane with 31 or more seals. 

The French Transport Ministry said Monday it had reached 
agreement with the former Austrian Formula One motor racing 
champion Niki Lauda under which his airline will be allowed to 
use Roissy-Charies de Gaulle airport, north of Paris. Mr. Lauda 
had threatened to fly without permission to tbe more convenient 
Orly Airport, south of the city, on Tuesday to dramatize his 
demand ror landing rights there. . (Reuters) 

The new Kansai International Airport serving Tokyo has result- 
ed in delays in some flights to Europe from Narita and other 
Japanese airports because of a “traffic jam” over Siberia, airlines 
say. (Bloomberg) 

Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida, plans a $2 bflfioa 
expansion to try to recapture an audience that bas dropped to 
about 29 million visitors this year, down by 3 million since 1990, 
The Orlando Sentinel reported. The expansion includes an anim al 
theme park, a water pant, and three hotels. (AP) 


In addition to the daily sports pages, Monday Sports is 
expanded to include full weekend results of interna- 
tional sporting events. On these pages, you’ll find the 
results of tennis, soccer, football, basketball, rugby, 
golf and many other sports. 

Every Monday in the International Herald Tribune. 


referral to by critics is the Nazi 

era, when ihe Vatican, its adver- flans concerning the violation 


daughters who sullied hex face.” SAS has cut its lowest tourist fares to 53 destinations by 
The question of atonement between 17 and 27 percent under certain conditions. The tickets 
for Catholic errors is sensitive must be bought between now and the end of the year for trips 
because it implies fallibility in between Jan. 9 and March 27. Two adults must travel together on 
the church's depiction of its the weekend. Children under 18 travel for half fare. (AFP). 
truth as univen 


iiction of its 


Flawless Inaugural for Channel Train 


Hcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


tribune. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


The Associated Press 

PARIS — Hundreds of passengers left Paris, 
London and Brussels on Monday morning on 
ihe inaugural public run of high-speed trains 
through the Ch ann el Tunnel 

French and British railroad officials hope the 
trains under the English Channel will compete 
with the heavy air traffic between Paris and 
London. 

The Eurostar passenger train left Paris or its 
three-hour, six-minute ride to downtown Lon- 
don on schedule at 8:07 A.M. with 794 passen- 
gers aboard. 

Ten minutes after leaving the Gare du Nord, 
the 18-car train hit its top speed of 302 kph (187 
mph). Later, it cut its speed to 100 mph as it 
passed through the 31.4-mile tunnel from a point 
near Calais, France, to Folkestone, England. 

Other trains left London for Paris and for the 
three-hour, 13-minute trip to Brussels through 


the $16 billion tunnel Ail trains arrived without 
incident. The train from London got to Paris 
four minutes ahead of schedule. 

First-class passengers pay the equivalent of 
S3 1 1 For a round trip, while those in second class 
pay $248. If they reserve 14 days or more in 
advance; the cost is $152. Children under 12 
travel for half price, and children under 4 ride 
free. 

Commercial service is beginning with two 
round-trips a day on each route. Departures are 
expected about every hour when traffic reaches 
its capacity in the second half of 1995. 

The Anglo-French company Eurotunnel, 
which built and operates the tunnel, said Mon- 
day it had revenues of $6 .38 million in the three 
months ending Sept. 30. The company says de- 
lays in opening the Channel Tunnel would cut 
projected revenues by about 75 percent for the 
year. 


USAir Denies News Report 
Of Plane Safety Problems 


The Associated Press 

ARLINGTON, Virginia * — USAir says a report claiming 
the airline repeatedly violated federal flight regulations con- 
tains false or misleading statements, but The New York 
Tunes is standing by its story. 

The Times reported that the airline has allowed jets to leave 
gates without enough fuel at least nine times and once used a 
jet for 13 days despite a dangerous crack in a wing flap. 

“It is a fair and accurate story; it speaks for itself ” said 
Gene Roberts, the newspaper's managing editor. 

A statement from the USAir, based in Arlington, defended 
its safety record. “The Federal Aviation Administration has 
kept USAir under intense scrutiny for almost the past two 
years,” the company said. “The FAA knows no shades of gray 
when it comes to safety. An airline either operates safely, or ft 
is not allowed to fly.” 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15 , 1994 


Page 3 


Jffith Clinton Vulnerable, the Republican Wallflowers Begin to Blossom 


By Richard L. Berke 

'New York Tima Sendee 


has formally announced, candidates are openly run- 
■ WASHINGTON — ^ TE-Tei. r. °mg for president. 

Ycra fust won control ti&SLSS ^ “5»Mican. . “ Dolesaid he was in Iowa to attend a postdec- 
• next? tiie Senate. Where do you go ton P^ty for Governor Teny E Braastad. Mr. 


•Des Moines. 

dullest 


Eg «« to Iowa, where the 

caucuses will be. 

_*SS <* Texafi ^ ahw there. So 
Specter of Pennsylvania, who 

00 Monda y* 


Gra mm was more direct. Friday, he said he was 
just basically visiting people" to talk about the 
1994 campaign and his own effort for 1996. 

Mr. Gramm said on Sunday tha t he planned to 
file papers Monday or Tuesday to start his cam- 
paign, Mr. Specter announced Monday that he had 
formed a committee to explore whether he should 
seek his party's presidential no mination. 

The interest in Des Moines became even more 
pronounced after President Bill Clinton's humilia- 
tion over his party’s loss of both h o u se s of rym p r e w 
And his weakened hold on the government and the 
electorate may motivate even more prospective pres- 
idential candidates who were wavering until now. 

“Anybody who has any credentials at all is going 
to take half a stab at it,” said Alex Castellanos, a 


Republican consultant whose company has worked 
for Mr. Dole and Mr. Gramm and who is being 
courted by than for 1996. “Ultimately, it may bo3 
down to a bunch of old faces. The big question is: Is 
there anybody new out there, or is it going to have to 
be a person like a Phil Gramm or a Bob Dole to 
cany the water for us?” 

The current climate is the flip side of four years 


a f’s nominee an enormous organizational and Should the standard-bearer be a hard-line conser- 

-raising advantage. vative like Mr. Gramm? A popular figure with 

Republican contenders wasted no time in Dying conservatives like former Vke Presiden! 

to turn the rout to their advantage. Several cam- 0811 

paig&ed actively for various candidates this fall and. Or perhaps a more moderate contender like Mr. 
indeed, they took credit for playing a role in the Specter, who favors abortion rights? 
outcome. Republicans may have a harder time in 1996 than 

in 1994 because Republicans in Congress will now. 


ago, when star Democrats resisted running, figuring Some, like Mr. Gramm, went so far as to say the. 

- - - - not for election was a referendum on ffiefrpreridcnualbids. be expected to perform and produce. 


that President George Bush had a clear s! 
election in the afterglow of the Gulf War. Most 
Democrats did not announce until late 1991. 

This year, many Republicans are expected to 
announce soon after New Year’s. Particularly in 
view of the election results, many see Mr. Clinton as 
a one- term president who could face strong primary 
challenges from Democrats on the left and the right 


on 


If voters endorsed the position that has been advo- The 1996 campaign could be the last chance for a 

cated by anyone who is likely to run for president in generation of the best- known Republican faces who 
’96,” be said, “they endorsed the positions that I were shut out during the Reagan-Busfa men 
have been advocating — that we need less govern- Ike White House, indudmg Mr. Dole, Mr. 
ment and more individual freedom.” and Jade F. Kemp, a former congressman from 

K^^ ho ™ ho ^ secre,fflyinthe 


Another important calculation is that Rcpubli- fai thful* Somehow, Republicans will have to settle __ Another familiar contender is Mr. Quayle, but he 
cans won the governorships in seven of the eight on a candidate with broad enough appeal to satisfy ts young enough to have a shot in the years ahead, 
states with the most electoral votes, handing the the party’s diverse factions. Some of his advisers have suggested that he wait. 


Homosexuals See Some Gains in Elections 


By David W. Dunlap 

New York Tones Service 

DALLAS — Although they 
lost several major alK*** and 
face a far more conservative 
^nd hostile Congress, homosex- 
ual political leaders said last 
week’s election was not a repu- 
diation by voters of the gay 
rights movement. 

“People are in mournin g, as 
they well should be,” said Shei- 
. la James Kuehl, sp eaking at a 


by theJNational Gay and Lesbi- 
an Task Force “Yet, we defeat- 
ed two anti-gay initiatives, and 
24 lesbian or gay officials were 
re-elected or newly ele cted " 


Ms. Kuehl became the first 
homosexual <*ai adidatc 
! to the Califontial^itia- 
ture, winning in a state assem- 
bly district that includes Santa 
Monica. 

The initiatives she refereed 
to, in Oregon and Idaho, would 
have prohibited laws protecting 

homosexuals, as a das, from 
discrimination in housing and 
employment. 

The measures would also 
have restricted Tumo rs' access 
to materials about homosexual- 
ity in pabhc libraries and would 
have forbidden public school 
teachers from presenting homo- 
sexuality as no rmal 


“Basic rights have been de- 
fended in Oregon,” said Julie 
Davis, campaign manager for 
the No on 13 Committee, 
named for the initia- 

tive, Measure 13. 

Oregon voters also re-elected 
four openly homosexual or bi- 
sexual members of the 60-seat 
House of Representatives. A 
fifth gay candidate was in a race 
that was still too dose to calL 

Voters in Phoenix sent an 
openly gay man. Ken Cheuv- 
ront, to the Arizona House of 
Representatives for the first 
time. Two of five seat 5 open on 
San Francisco’s Board of Su- 


POLITICAL MOTES 




A Tightening of the locpholeg 

WASHINGTON — In addition to denying 
the Clinton administration the power to set a 
legislative agenda for the 104th Congress, it is 
now becoming dear that the Nov, g elections 
will make it more difficult for the White 
House to assert its soda] and political priori- 
ties by issuing new regulations. . 

Before the election, the administration had 
hoped to accomplish through regulation some 
of the things that the 103d Congress had 
refused to do through legislation, like tighten?' 
ing environmental restrictions on mining^ - 

But with Republicans having captured 
both houses of Congress, the administration 
v now finds that strategy undermined by the 
. shift in political power.. 

Every law Congress passes isput into effect 
through regulations issued by federal agen- 
cies, mostof them controlled by President Bill 
t . CEnton’s appointees. That gives, the adminis- ■ 
tea Don extensive influenceover everything ■ 
from .the kinds of automobile Detroit pro- 
duces to which pesticides farmers. use. 

But because of the checks and balances 
between the legislative and executive 
branches, senior administration officials have 
begun to recognize that Tuesday’s election 
results have considerably weakened their 
ability, to govern by administrative actions. 

■ : It may prbveharder for Mr. Clinton replay 
the regulatory pari against a Congress in a 
distinctly deregnlatoiy mood. (NYT) 


Repub li ca n Euphorla Coob . 

WASHINGTON — Republican congres- 1 
jrional leaders, , having spent most of the last 
week boasting about what they can accom- 
plish with their new majorities, now acknowl- 
edge t&il there are probably many things they 
cannot. Even though they now control both 
houses oF.Congress for the first time in 40 


be out of reach. 

“A lot of people are feeling their oats these 
days," said Senator BobDole of Kansas, soon 
to be the Senate majority leader. “Not every- 
thing is going to happen, he said. “Some of. 
tiiese things we’ll have to phase in, or change 
or modify.” - _. _ 

. Boosting defense spending, slashing farm 


subsidies, restricting abortions, removing the 
ban on assault guns — all these and more win 
'face formidable obstacles when the new Con- 
gress convenes in January, the Republican 
leaders said. (LAT) 

In Mew Yorfc, an About-Face 

ALBANY, New York — Governor-elect 
George Patalid will begin a sweeping overhaul 
of state government this week, seeking to 
impose his Republican vision on a sprawling 
bureaucracy guided by Democratic policies 
and partisans for the last 20 years. 

The effort will start with the appointment 
of commissioners and directors to run some 
40 state agencies. The first is expected to be 
the naming of a budget director, who will be 
faced with a shortfall of as much as S4 billion 
in the next fiscal year. 

But (be process wiB eventually entail hiring 
hundreds of deputies and assistants entrusted 
with prosaic duties such as issuing drivers’ 
licenses. • - 

■ By all accounts, the retooling will be exten- 
sive. The governor-elect has direct power to 
replace anywhere from 2,500 to more than 
5,000 state officials, and advisers to Mr. Pa- 
talti have suggested that they are prepared to 
make wholesale changes to insure that their 
controi over a bureaucracy largely installed 
.by Democrats is cranplete. 

“The philosophies are at such different 
ends of the spectrum,” said John Sweeney, 
executive director of the state Republican 
Party, “that 1 can’t imagine there would be 
many people that will stick around.” 

Mr. Patalri, 49, faces difficulties above and 
beyond the normal hurdles confronting any 
new governor. Republicans have not con- 
trolled the executive branch since Malcolm 
Wilson was governor in 1974, which leaves 
him no ready pool of professionals schooled 
in Republican ways of governing. (NYT) 

Qnote/lfaqMOte 

Peter Hart, a Democratic pollster, arguing 
that the message of the midterm elections was 
that people want things done differently in 
Washington: “A lot bad to do with taxes and 
spending. A lot had to do with the way 
Congress operates, and' in the end voters 
didn’t want a new deal, they wanted a new 
deck. That’s what they got." ( WP) 


pervisors were won by lesbians 
and another by a gay man 
Three gay U.S. Representatives 
— Barney Frank and Gerry E. 
Studds erf Massachusetts and 
Steven Gunderson of Wiscon- 
sin — were re-elected. 

While homosexual candi- 
dates made strides in local races 
around the nation, however, 
two statewide candidates lost: 
Karen S. Burstein, who ran for 
attorney general in New York, 
and Tony Miller, who ran for 
secretary of state in California 

When some 1,000 gay and 
lesbian organizers from around 
the country began arriving on 
Wednesday for the five-day 
strategy session convened by 
the task force, they did so 
knowing that political allies like 
Governor Ann Richards of 
Texas had been defeated. 

“People were not only frus- 
trated but fearful saying things 
like. This is looking like a scari- 
er place to live,’ " said Deborah 
Jonnson-Rokm, co-chairwom- 
an of the task force, which ad- 
vocates equality and dvU rights 
for homosexuals. 

She said the mood changed 
as word spread that two dozen 
gay officials had been elected 
and that Measure 13 in Oregon 
and a similar measure. Proposi- 
tion 1 in Idaho, bad been reject- 
ed, although a similar initia tive 
passed in Alachua County, 
Florida. 

“We realized that we really 
were making a significant 
amount of progress," Ms. John- 
son-Rolon said. 



i r T- - ■ ■ r 


# 

focr Aadma/Rcata* 

TROPICAL STORM HITS HAITI — A vehicle being washed away watched by residents of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 
The storm killed at least 100 Haitians and left thousands homeless. It also fait the eastern coast of Florida. 




Away From Politics 

• Six astronauts landed the space shuttle 
Attends in California after a tropical 
storm chased them from their intended 
runway in Florida. 

• A caijacker with a submachine eon in 
San Francisco was shot and killed by the 
police after firing more than 100 rounds 
into buildings and ev ening traffic. 

• A suicidal young man who jumped from 
the roof of his 17-story building in New 
York survived because he hit two tree 


branches before landing mi a car, the 
police said. 

• A 17-year-old charged with shooting an 
English tourist to death during a botched 
robbery last year in Florida, will be the 
first of two teenagers to go on trial in the 
slaying. The victim was the ninth foreign 
visitor killed in Florida in a year. 

• Tests on concrete maxes used for run- 
ways at Denver’s new airport were ma- 
nipulated to make the concrete appear 
stronger than it was. The Denver Post 
reported. 


• Leonard Jeffries was dealt a setback in 
his fight to remain chairman of the black 
studies department of Gty College of 
New York when the Supreme Court told 
a federal appeals court to reconsider its 
ruling that CCNY had violated Mr. Jef- 
fries’ iteht to free speech when it re- 
el him 


moved 


as chairman in 1991. 


Mr. Jeffries had accused Jews of fi- 
nancing the slave trade, said Jews and 
the Mafia conspired to belittle blacks in 
movies, and made anti-Semitic com- 
ments about colleagues. ap. Return 


Smoking Out Press Secrets 

ATobacco Finn Sues to Inspect Reporters’ TVavel Records 


By William Glaberson 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Journalists 
sometimes promise to keep the 
identities of their sources secret. 
Occasionally, a reporter even 
goes to jail to keep a pledge of 
confidentiality. 

But what would happen to 
those solemn promises of secre- 
cy if reporters' credit-card, air- 
line and rental car bills — even 
private telephone records — 
could be opened for inspection? 

In legal papers filed in a Vir- 
ginia court last week, many of 
the country’s biggest news orga- 
nizations argued against an ef- 
fort by the Philip Morris Cos. to 
open up reporters’ travel and 
telephone records in search of 
their sources. 

The news organizations were 
skiing with the ABC television 
network, which was sued by 


> Stress and Burnout in the Legal Fast Lane 

, m A Sinit. by Parents, Raise Issue of Pressures in Bis City Law Firms • 


- By Benjamin Weiser 

Washington Poet Seniee 

■ NEW YORK — Charles Ford McKen- 
zie, a promising 1990 graduate of Yale 
Law School began practicing at a major* 
WaB Street firm and two years later leapt 
off the roof of an 1 8-story hotel. Thecoro- 
aer attributed his death to “massive blunt 
tr auma.” His parents, however, saw an 
underiymg canse: the law firm itself. 

They sued the firm — Cleary, Gottlieb, 


moving associates alon| and working these 
unbearable hours, testing their mettle, is 
universally; it's part erf the overall 
system.” 

No one suggests that overworked law- 
yers are being driven to leap off bxril drags 
at every turn, but the McKenzie case 
touches an some of the hottest issues in 

1C ^hS^r^m 5 Bar Association, for ex- 
ample, held a recent panel discusson in 

competition W&SSS 

sags gsass— sttMtassaa 

tkm and-breakdown. . . . T T 

books also as examined rite 
Ju father. Gene, sank -W» -lie tost Lawyer Faffing Ideals 

20 hoots a&ty at the office, co go ^ ^ Pmfesaon/sYak: Umvosty 

home at night law professor ; Anthony T. Kroinwm, £ 
, tne micauu — * gues that the sheer increase m the number 

of billable hours demanded of corporate 
attorneys has had a huge and detrimental 
effect on the quahty of tisor lives. . 
.«gii£gesting that the, pro&ons are not 

confiited to Wall Street taw finns akme, a 

1990 stndy of 1,184 lawyers m Washington 
state found that 19 percent suffered from 
depression, cotqtered with 3 to 9 pocent 
of individuals generally in Western indus- 
trial na tions, and that most erf die dc- 



raaeous oonauci of lawyers at the finn, 
has drawn widespread publicity in thete- 


sal press and contributed to a longstand- 
ing detoate in the profession; Do firms 
dnve their young associates too hard. 

What is the toll? 

Mr. McKenzie’s father and friends say 
tins was a man who had no history 01 
mortal illness, depicting him as jost one ot 
thousands of young lawyers struggling to 

rise to the top of. their fiod. 

“Charles cXOTjphfied ti ^P^?J^ n attor . r A Owagoptydixnher^ast and lawyer, 

large SeHsTau^rof thertcentbook 

trays’ performances bcyradafll Soul of the Law,” has argued that 

be Stated to 

yer whose firm Fried the sun how lawyers are trained, 

rats. , j Nrf-w York ■ “This kind of abstract, detached, objee- 

"It’s a heartened gWanmNwi^ five, impersonal approach to bfemgeoeral 
City, -wfcichis is wi^^yera are taught and expectedio 

g£SS. **.»■ s** 


number cme thing they cxnnplain about is a 
sense of inferiority and inadequacy in in- 
rsonal relationships — which is basi- 
loneliness. 

reason suicide is especially a dan- 
ger for lawyers,” he said, “is because of the 
detachment between the legal imagination 
— the legal mind — ana the everyday 

world.” 

Lawyers at deary say they are confident 
that the fannly[s suit has no merit, that as 
tragic as his suicide was, Charles McKen- 
zie was in no way mistreated by his col- 
leagues. 

“AH of this stuff about being belea- 
guered by excess work, by bring setup — 
it’s all a total and utter and absolute fabri- 
cation,” the managing partner, Ned Stiles, 
said. “I don’t think his experience at 
deary, Gottlieb had anything to do with 
it” 

In coart papers, the firm denied the 
allegations and asked a judge to dismiss 
the suit Last spring a judge agreed, ruling 
that die alleged conduct md not reach the 
strict legal threshold for a claim allf 
emotional distress by one’s employer. 
McKenzie's parents have appeal) 


ledthedis- 


T don’t know whether this is a shake- 
down or whether it is a case of a father who 
is plagued by a mixture of understandable 
gntf andpaftaps guBl" Mr. Sales said. 

While there is disagreement over wheth- 
er the law firm should be held responsible 
for the shade, many of those interviewed 
for this article thought that Ins complaints 
of overwork, feedings of bring trapped and 
isolated, and his growing exhaustion at 
least symbolize a broader problem. Others 
pointed out that many lawyers thrive in 
hjgjth gtress environment. 


Philip Morris in March. Philip 
Morris contends it was libeled 
by several ABC News programs 
that said the tobacco industry 
regularly laced cigarettes with 
extra nicotine. 

Seeking to enter the gargan- 
tuan libel suit as friends of the 
court, the news organizations 
said the tobacco company’s ef- 
fort to examine reporters’ travel 
and telephone records would vi- 
olate the First Amendment. 

They also said it would so 
discourage whistle-blowers that 
it “could have far-reaching re- 
percussions affecting the ability 
of the media to gather news for 
dissemination to the public.” 

The suit is raising new ques- 
tions about whether journalists 
wffi be able to keep then secrets 
or gather new ones in an elec- 
tronic world where their every 
move can be traced. 

One of Philip Morris's goals, 
the first few months of the case 
revealed, was to discover the 
identity of a former manager of 
RJ. Reynolds Tobacco, a Phil- 
ip Morris rival, who was shown 
in silhouette on ABCs “Day 
One” news magazine program. 
The silhouetted speaker, who 
was <xily one of the network's 
sources, said that tobacco com- 
panies added nicotine “to keep 
the consumer happy.” 

As is typical in high-stakes 
libel cases, Philip Morris’s law- 
yers have said they plan to try 
to force the ABC journalists, 
including John Martin, the cor- 
respondent, and Walt Bogdan- 
ich, the producer, to name their 
confidential source. 

But this fall, in what lawyers 
said was an unprecedented 
move, Philip Morns also issued 
13 subpoenas aimed at tracing 
the moves of the journalists 
while they were researching the 
.tobacco broadcasts. The sub- 
poenas were issued to compa- 
nies including American Ex- 
press, Hertz, AT&T and the 
Adam’s Marie Hotel in Winston 
Salem, North Carolina. 

Last week, lawyers for ABC 
filed a legal brief seeking to 
have the court quash the sub- 
poenas. The ABC lawyers noted 
that most federal and state 
courts, including the courts in 
Virginia, have recognized that 
reporters have a ^qualified priv- 
ilege” to protect their confiden- 
tial sources except in rare cir- 
cumstances. 

The ABC lawyers argued that 
permitting the subpoenas for 
the journalists' financial re- 
cords would amount to an “end 
run” around constitutional 
principles. 


“In this modem world,” the 
ABC lawyers said, “reporters 
cannot gather news from across 
the nation without making trie- 
phone calls, boarding airplanes, 
renting cars, staying in hotels 
and using credit cards. A re- 
porter's privilege that prorides 
reliable protection rally where 
reporters gather news on foot 
and by word of mouth would be 
no privilege at alL” 

la the friend-of-tbe-cotm 
brief filed last week, tire other 
news organizations, including 
The New York Times, The 
Washington Post, NBC, CNN, 
Gannett and The New Yorker, 
said the subpoenas from Philip 
Morris represented an intrusion 
on reporters’ privacy. Lawyers 
for the news organizations said 
they feared the new technique 
would be adopted by other liti- 
gants if it succeeded. 

“The risk that such records 
may be available to litigants,” 
the news organizations said, 
“may inhibit reporters’ ability 
to promise a confidentiality 
they cannot feel confident of 
maintaining.’' 

Philip Morris has not yet re- 
sponded. A company spokes- 
woman said it would not com- 
ment because The Times was 
one of the news organizations 
participating in the friend-of- 
thc-court brief. 

But lawyers for other tobacco 
companies and libel experts 
said the tactic of seeking the 
reporters’ travel and telephone 
records was a logical twist in 
what is rapidly becoming one of 

the most important libel suits in 
years. Some of them noted that 
rare purpose of the Philip Mor- 
ris suit might be to discourage 
other whistle-blowers inside the 
tobacco industry. 

Some lawyers who have sued 
news organizations in other li- 
bel cases say the press often 
adopts the stance that its re- 
ports are true and therefore not 
libelous, but then refuses to 
identity the secret sources. 

That is unfair to anyone who 
claims to be the subject of li- 
belous news reports, said Mar- 
tin London, a lawyer at Paul, 
Weiss, Rifiind, Wharton & 
Garrison in New York who has 
represented tobacco companies 
in libel cases. 

“The press wants to have its 
cake and eat it too ” he said. 
“They want to say they reason- 
ably relied on a source and they 
don’t want to tell you who it is. 
The press takes a doctrinaire 
because they believe 
are above the law.” 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


Clinton Seeks Unity 
On Nuclear Accord 
With North Korea 


By Elaine Sciolino 

’ #•» Ye* Timet Strike 

JAKARTA — In broad- 
ranging meetings with Asian 
Pacific leaders. President 
Ccnton sought to bolster 
; -support Monday for Washing- 
ton's nuclear accord with North 
Korea and train the spotlight 
on America’s more prominent 
' Asia-Pacific role. 

Bat senior U. S. officials ac- 
iJmowledged that the United 
States faced extraordinarily 
complicated negotiations m the 
,;commg months with Japan, 
! .South Korea and other partici- 
pants in carrying out die accord 
..over the next decade. Even Mr. 

Clinton said that its implemen- 

tation would be difficult. 

Reeling from last week’s elec- 
tion that ushered in a Republi- 
can-dominated Congress for 
the first time in four decades, 
Mr. Clinton enjoyed the adula- 
tion on Monday that accompa- 
nies any occasion when heads 
of stale come together, 
i ' He used the occasion of his 
r meetings with the leaders of 
i -China, South Korea, Japan and 
rAustralia. preceding the open- 
ing of the summit conference of 
_lhe 18-member Asia-Pacific 
Economic Cooperation forum 
to try to regain his political 
footing. 

In Manila on Sunday and 
again in Jakarta on Monday, 
Mr. Clinton told his counter- 
parts that he alone was in 
charge of American foreign pol- 
icy and that the global impact 
of the elections was, if not mini- 
mal, at least manageable. 

After last week's election. 
Secretary of State Warren M. 
Christopher talked about the 
harmony that pervades U. S. 
foreign policy. But the adminis- 
tration has since refined that 
position, and Mr. Clinton and 
his aides have taken to giving a 
basic civics lesson in the consti- 


tutional powers of the president 
to make and execute foreign 
policy. 

Mr. Clinton joked about how 
the tables had turned from last 
summer's summit meeting in 
Naples of the world’s leading 
industrialized nations. At that 
time. Prime Minister Tonuichi 
Murayama of Japan had 
emerged as the head of a new 
coalition government only days 
before, and had sought to reas- 
sure Mr. Clinton about conti- 
nuity in Japan’s foreign policy; 
this year, Mr. Clinton said, it 
was the other way around. 

Many of the meetings on 
Monday focused on the admin- 
istration’s plans for carrying 
out the nuclear accord that re- 
quires North Korea to freeze 
and ultimately dismant le its nu- 
clear program in exchange for 
$4 billion in economic incen- 
tives. Japan and South Korea 
have agreed in principle to pay 
for most of the program. 

Both Japanese and South 
Korean officials said that then- 
governments were not ready to 
make a firm financial commit- 
meat, and because of the sensi- 
tivity of the issue; money was 
not discussed on Monday, a se- 
nior U. S. official said. 

Early Monday, President 
Jiang Zemin of China told Mr. 



Continued from Page 1 


the world, consistently and reg~ 


had “no problem” with the oc- ularijr raises human rights is- 


Qinton that China “welcomed cupation, and that he felt “com- sues » ' ^ sa ^ 


strongly” the American agree- 
ment to halt North Korea’s na- 


Zemin of China, he said, “We 


{In Lisbon. Prime Minister made it absolutely dear that in 


deal, the United States, South asylum to the 29 East Timorese, 
Korea and Japan hastily sched- but he also pressed Mr. Clinton 
uled a three-way meeting Mon- to take a tougher line on the 
day evening after the dinner East Timor issue with Jakarta.] 


that officially opened the At 
APEC talks. In a joint state- Clint 
ment, they called the successful fense 
carrying oat of the nuclear cord, 
agreement “of the utmost im- “T 
portance." more 


more than any other country m 


APEC; Asians Look to U.S. for Leadership on Trade 


Continued from Page 1 

gion and that 2 million Ameri- 
can jobs depended on those 
sales to the fastest-growing re- 
gion in the world. 

“It is very important that we 
proceed first with GATT, and 
second with APEC so that we 
ran continue the economic re- 


Troops Patrol in Rio 
Before State Elections 

The Associated Press 

RIO DE JANEIRO — As 


co very at home and continue to 
provide increasing opportuni- 
ties for our people,” he said. 

*1 don’t want to jump the gun 
on what the agreement will be.” 
Mr. Clinton said. “But I think 
most Americans would like it 
very much to know that at some 
certain date every market in this 
part of the world — the fastest- 
growing part of the wodd with 
already some of the most pow- 
erful economies in the world — 
would be as open to our prod- 
ucts as our markets are to 
theirs.” 

Most East Asian economies 


r £>rehin rm Tmr dosc *** American market to 

ersmp on Lraue ^ ^minis tration has 

adopted the view that the best 
agency supervising global trade way to promote democracy is to 


many as 20,000 troops will pa- have substantially higher tariff animation program 
trol the streets of Rio de Janeiro and nontariff barriers than ing of the U.S. r 


trol the streets of Rio de Janeiro 
to try to ensure safe balloting in 
Tuesday's gubernatorial elec- 
tions. 


and nontariff barriers than 
those of the Western members 
of APEC 

A U.S. official said that Mr. 


GATT, just as is true for any economic aide, aaoing tnat it two, Allan Naim and Amy 
other nation.” is still absolutely the intention Goo dman, after other joumaf- 

Orina mamtains' that it 5 a ° rihc United Stales to raise ists swarmed around them.-.-- 

developing country and allow- ‘ r ■ ■■ ■ n ■«■■ ■ ■■■■■ ■■■■ 

ances should be made. There TiTTOOT A . . . 

ftJSSKSSSfi KUbblA: Yeltsin Warns Generals 

been trying to link its reserva- bom Page 1 fieve the number already may 

tions over the APEC trade lib- ... . ^ ^ be as low as 1.4 million, 

eralization program to a soften- t l ^ f^ esSl , His address was the only part 

mg of the U.S. position on ° f U* conclave, schedu&alo 

China’s reentry intoGATT. ™ g o« g too skmty. tto trntts days, t5a vras open U) 


ing of the 
Qnna’s reen 


Heve the number already may 
be as low as 1.4 million. 

His address was the only part 
of the conclave, scheduled to 


The army was ordered last Clinton had discussed with Mr. 
month to help fight crime in the Jiang China ’s wish to re-enter 
city, where police say an aver- GATT in time to become a 
age of 20 people are lolled every founding member of the World 
day. Seventeen Brazilian states Trade Organization, which wifl 
wifi elect governors Tuesday. take over in January as the 


But a spokesman for Mr. 
Jiang said Monday that China 
supported the APEC objective 
of achieving trade liberalization 
by 2020 , provided the timetable 
was staggered to take account 
of different levels of develop- 
ment. 


^3 Thai 

Request for Business Process 
Reengineering Consultants 

As part of our business process reengineering program, Thai Airways 
International Public Company Limited (THAI) is currently seeking to 
appoint a professional, experienced and qualified company to review and 
identify our work processes and assist THAI in redesigning and 
implementing them as well as assessing their impact on sales, customer 
satisfaction, corporate image or identity personnel morale and airline 
profitability. 

Interested companies are expected to have under their employ a team 
with proven experience in providing reengineering consultancy services 
or having participated in a reengineering project as an owner. 

The requirement for pre-qualification of the Consultants and the details 
of proposal submission are contained in our ‘Terms of Reference'' which 
interested parties may now purchase at a cost of Baht 10,000 ob tainab le 
from the office of Vice President Corporate Planning, Thai Airways 
International Public Company Limited, 89 Vibhavadi Rangsit Road, 
Bangkok 10900. The deadline for submission of the firm proposal will be 
on or before January 16, 1995 at 17:00 hours Bangkok time. 

THAI reserves the right to reject any or all proposals, waive any 
formality or accept such proposals as may be considered advantageous. 


was going too slowly, that units “T ~ 

last two days, that was open to 
were stfll undermanned, that re- ^ press _ ^ 

sources and weaponry werebe- ^ Y dtsn also used his 

“t « i ' lescn ' b '. hi 5 ?° n, f ns 

obligations, aaxnding ®to the SSS 5 TJBP?S£ 
R^an press agency, liar- “ wmbrrt reading 

“There are problems with 
discipline, while the loss of “ ** 

weapons and materiel conda- ^ frallght ^ . 

quoted Mr. pQjgQjj^j expansion of existing 

fstsststies ghJSSS; V s 

“and the emergence of new 
with the troops. . . . , ones in which Russia will be 


Mr. Yeltsin also criticized ■ , , v 

failures to erne properly 1 for the mvolyed because of its gcopoUt- 
* j real « nd geostrategic interests, 

troops, some of whom lack de- 7 * 1 . _ 
cent housing. He urged the The Russian govenmient 
SrL rSS. (aktnTi rhS: oomptoned officuffly on Satur- 


piime minister, Viktor S. Cher- 

toMSsi^^ffuSafor ^SuSjg domestic ones, & 
to ensure suffiaent funding for r annMm 


IV biuiMeui Jiuiuujfi IVI T Tm*sw>4 a.isc 

the army, which has com- Unrted Steles appears rncreas- 

WtniniH *“gly insistent ID pushing 

SSffjSSSLte 


though more than 20 percent of 

that are not m the framework of 
total spending, is too small. iri rrr s „ 

"nTarrald forees cannot collccrivc acuon. 

solve their financial problems The statement was a direct 
themselves and they should not reference to the Clinton admin- 
be pushed onto the path of istration’s decision to stop en- 
commeree,” Mr. Yeltsin said, forcing an arms embargo 
He said the armed forces would ag ai ns t Bosnian Muslims, but 
be reduced by 385,000 men in Russian officials said it referred 
1994 and would number to Iraq, as well, where Washing- 
1,917,400 men by Jan. 1, with ton has been resisting Russian 
an ultimate goal of some 1.5 efforts to soften the embargo on 
million. Western officials be- Baghdad. 


|NTKRN\THW*Al. 


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Burmese Specter at Jakarta 

U.S. Failure to Tame Rangoon Mars Mood 


By Thomas W. Lippman 


JAKARTA — For all the apparent harmo- 
ny here as President Bill Clinton discusses 
economic cooperation and regional security 
with leaders of the major nations of East and 
Southeast Asia, a country that is not present 
serves as a r emin der of Asia’s determination 
not to take orders from Washington. 

The country is Burma, an impoverished 
nation ruled by a military junta that Waiting- 
ton regards as so odious that the Cli nt o n 
administration made it a target last spring of 
an isolation campaign aimed at redudngit to 
pariah status. 

as the^State Law an^Order Restoration 
Council, or SLORC, into relaxing its grip cm 
Burma’s long-suffering citizens and to stop 
cooperating with the heroin producers whose 
output is flooding the United States. But it 
did not work, mostly because other Asian 
nations — in cluding longstanding friends — 
refused to follow Washington's lead. 

Last month, the Clinton administration 
threw in the towel and dispatched an envoy to 
open a new dialogue. 


Crafc Pop/Tbr Awmnl Pro* 

An Indonesian security officer hying to Mock a camera at the APEC summit center m 
Jakarta as two American journalists, Amy Goodman and Allan Naim, sought to organize 
.a press conference about dvfl rights demonstrations in Dili, the capital of East Timor. 

TIMOR* Embassy Sit-In Forces Human-Rights Issue 


these issues” in talks with other 
countries. 

Mr. Clinton’s entourage has 


fortable” with an Tnrionrsian 0f bis meeting Monday provided ample evidence of the 
assurance that no retribution morning with President Jiang administration s eagerness to 


scent nuclear weapons pro- would be exercised. Zemin of China, he said, “We make cash registers ring for 

gram. fin Lisbon. Prime Minister made it absolutely dear that in U.S. goods in fast-growing mar- 

In order to continue their dis- Anibal Cavaco Silva said frig order for the UJS. relationship kets regardless of the type of 
c essi o ns on the North Korean gove rnmen t was willing to offer China to fully flower, there government in charge. 


Commerce Secretary Ronald 
H. Brown, for example, is plan- 
ning to trumpet the signing of 
some lucrative Indonesian con- 
tracts for American companies 
on Wednesday. One of these 


ylnm to the 29 East Timorese, had to be progress on all Commerce Secretaty' Ronald 
It he also pressed Mr. dinted fronts.” H. Brown, for example, is plan- 

take a tougher line on the Despite such rhetoric, the to trumpet toe signing of 
1 st Timor issue with Jakarta.] fact is that Mr. Clinton decided 501116 lucrative Indonesian con- 
At a news conference, Mr. last spring not to allow ques- Amentan companies 

Clinton offered a spirited de- tions of individual liberty or 

fense of his human-rights re- press freedom to block im- deals provided the details are 
rd. proved economic ties with such wrapped up -—ranks as perils 

“The United States, perhaps important nations as Indonesia 

we Than anv other country m and China. Rather than trying hon agreonent for Exxon Corp. 

to force UK political views on to develop a huge natural gas 
other nations by threatening to 

im r Tmih> dose the American market to ■ Journalists Rally Round 
' W T them, the administration has In another incident Monday 

. . , . , j adopted the view that the best tha t embarrassed Indonesian 

ipney supervising global trade way to promote democracy is to authorities, two Western jour- 
l * es - enhance their ability to trade nalists were grabbed by security 


review within the administration and of con- 
sultations with Congress. 

Thailand refused to cut off commerce with 
its neighbor. China declined to halt arms 
sales. Japan extended foreign aid to Burma. 
Deputy Sccretary of State Strobe Talbott was 
“shocked,” one senior official said, to learn 
that even Australia had rejected the U.S. 
effort. 

Result: a 180-degree turn in US. policy, 
with an effort now to reach out instead of 
stamp out 

Deputy Assistant Secretary of Stale Thom- 
as Hubbard was dispatched to Rangoon in 
late October to inform the junta that “We 
wish to have more constructive relations in 
the future,” as be put it. 

The Burma issue is only one of many, 
ran g in g from the crodal to the trivial, on 
which Asian nations that maintain generally 


friendly relations with the United States are 
willing to defy Washington when it suits 
rh«»m They may find Washington's ideas 
valua ble, as appears to have happened in the 
Asjan response to Mr. Clinton’s afort to turn 
the Asia- Pacifi c Economic forum into a per- 
manent economic force. But they act in then- 
own intert&t, often disregarding U.S. desires. 

Singapore’s insistence on caning a young 
American, Michael Fay, for vandalism was 
one example. Another was Thailand’s recent 
rejection of a UK request to stockpile no- 
tary supplies there — a rejection applauded 

by neighboring countries. On Monday, Resi- 
dent Jiang Termn of China reminded Mr. 
rim inn that Pi™, like many other Asian 
fittrirtna, rejects the US. view that individual 
liberty and political freedom are fundamental 
h mwan lights that take precedence over sta- 
bility and communal rights. 

In the case of Burma, Asia’s complete un- 
wfllmgness to fall into step left the adminis- 
tration little choice 1 ml to change polic y, a 
ttninr wffwaal said, but he added, “we 
wouldn’t have done it just because of that ” 

What TwaHe the move palatable, he said, 
was a modest gesture from the junta: opening 
discussions with Burma's best known politi- 
cal dissident, the Nobd. Peace prize laureate 
Daw Aung San Suu Kyi. 

She is in her sixth year of house arrest in 
Rangoon and the junta has refused to release /*- 
her, tut has begun discussions with her that 
she apparently regards as useful, a UJS. offi- 
cial said. 

“We had to be satisfied it was a real change, 
not just cosmetic, and she told us she was 
satisfied it is,” the official said. 

Mr. Hubbard’s assignment was to tell the 
junta that the United States was prepared to 
respond proportionately to whatever such 
gestures Rangoon makes. He told reporters in 
Bangkok after his trip that toe United States 
was ready to “move forward aggressively’ to 
improve relations, but only in response to 
actions by the junta. 

“It’s up to them,” an official who traveled 
here with Mr. Clinton said. “If they make 
small moves, we make small moves. If they go 
East, we go fast.” 


MILITIA: Washington Is the Foe 


The official said Mr. Clinton grow. officers as they tried to organize 

had told Mr. Jiang that toe “Growth makes people bet- a news conference on East Ti- 
United States would welcome ter off, and that in turn means mor at the s ummi t center in 
the addition of China, “but that they begin independently seek- Jakarta, Agence France- Presse 
the Chinese have to do so on toe ing democratic rights,” said W. reported, 
baas of the basic rules of Bowman Cutter, a top Clinton The security men released the 
GATT, just as is true for any economic aide, adding that “it two, Allan Naim and Amy 
other nation.” is still absolutely toe intention Goo dman, after other jou rnal - 


CaBtmned tram Page 1 

computer networks, fax, short- 
wave radio, home-produced 
videos and desk-top publishing. 

“Although thwarting gun 
control is toe chief aim of the 
militias, they seek to turn toe 
dock back on federal involve- 
ment in a host of other issues as 
well — education, abortion and 
the environment,” cond tided a 
report released last month by 
the Anti-Defamation League of 
B’nai B’rito. “The question, 
which no one can answer just 
yet, is what, exactly, toe militias 
intend to do with their guns.” 

The Michigan Militia, which 
is a leader m toe movement, 
daims it has 12,000 members, 
but the number cannot be inde- 
pendently verified. 

The 100 or so people who 
gathered for imlirar y tr aining 
here on a rainy weekend includ- 
ed small-business owners, exec- 
utives, auto workers and nurses. 
With the exception of one black 
woman, a nurse from Detroit, 
they were white; 10 were wom- 
en. 

At a makeshift gate of f alien 
pine logs, two young men in 
camouflage carrying semiauto- 
matic rifles took toe names and 
license plate numbers of visi- 
tors. Down the worn path 
through tiie forest. big-bdQied 
men in uniforms, their faces 
painted green and black, 
croudied in wet grass as they 
practiced reconnaissance^ am- 
bushes and self-defense. Occa- 
sionally there was the sound of 
tired men grunting on a crude 
obstacle course and toe sharp 
reports of bullets. 

The group’s leader, Norman 
Olson, 48. a gun shop owner 
and pastor of the Calvary Bap- 
tist Church in nearby Alanson, 
said that the training was for 
defensive purposes only. 


“When we started the mflitia, 
I thought it might get big very 
fasti” Mr. Olson sard. “Td been 
seeing the uneasiness that peo- 
ple have about tbeir govern- 
ment. It's not a government by 
toe people anymore If s a gov- 
ernment of bureaucrats. We are 
c easing to be a republic. Their 
fear is a response, when people 
sense danger, they will come 
together to defend themselves. 
That is whafs happening.” 

In Michigan, marry state and 
local police say they are not 
keeping dose trade of militia 
-organizing, noting that toe 
members have toe qght to as- 
semble peacefully and practice 


-firing weapons. 

Still, concern about the mili- 
tias is growing nationwide, and 
civil liberties groups say they 
are worried about what toe 
Anti-Defamation League calls 
-“hatemongers of longstanding” 
in the movement The Southern 
Poverty Law Center, a Mont- 
gomery, Alabama, group that 
trades far right organizations, 
issued a report last month as- 
serting that white supremacist 
involvement in toe militia 
movement was growing. 

But Chip Beriet, an analyst 
with Political Research Asso- 
ciates in Cambridge, Massachu- 
setts, which studies the nrilitias, 
said they were sot heavily influ- 
enced by racism or anti-Semi- 
tism in particular but are part of 
a much broader movement. 

“What you have with this 
movement is a critique of the 
government that comes from 
the ri^ht based on the paranoid 
conspiracy theories of secret 
elites that plan an apocalyptic 
takeover of toe United States,” 
Mr. Beriet said. “White su- 
premacy is not a principle of 
unity of this movement. Be- 
cause of that, it has the ability 
to draw from a much broader 
constituency.” 


Off We Go! U.K. Punters 
Brave 14 MSUon-1 Odds 

The Aaodaud Press 

LONDON — Britain launched on Monday its first nation- 
al lottery of this century, which is intended to raise £1 billion 
(S1.6 bffikm) a year for charities, sports, arts and heritage 
prefe cts . The first draw will take place Saturday, with a top 
prize of about £2 million. 

A firework display exploded over the Tower of London as 
lottery tickets costing £1 each went on sale at 10,000 stores, 
post offices and other outlets around Ok country. 

Odds against winning the big one are calculated at 14 
milli on to one, but there also are thousands of smaller prizes 
starting from £10. Each punter must choose a combination of 
six numbers between one and 49, which will be fed into a 
computer network. 

The government has awarded a seven-year license to run 
the lottery to Camelot, a consortium of five British companies 
— toe food company Cadbury Schweppes, the banknote 
printer De La Rue, the lottery operator Grech, toe computer 
comp any ICL and Racal Electronics. 


SINAI: 

Red Sea Riviera 

Goetined from Page 1 

linking the Red Sea coasts of 
Egypt, Jordan and Israel would 
have been unthinkable. 

Only in the last few months 
have Israel and Jordan opened 
a border crossing — currently 
limited to foreigners — near the 
Israeli resort city of Eilat and 
the Jordanian port of Aqaba/ 
situated within sight of euX 
other. 

The tourist boom is under 
way in the southern Sinai, an 
' austerety beautiful juxtaposi- 
tion of mountains and sea 
where Bedouin herdsmen still 
cut londy figures across ocher 
desert sands. European tourists 
are flocking to resorts such as 
Naama Bay, whose palm- 
fringed beach is lined with 
modern hotels, outdoor bars 
and pizzerias. Hotels report 
year-round occupancy rates of 
80 percent, and the number of 
hotel beds in the area is expect- 
ed to top 12,000 by toe end of 
1995, up from just 1,000 in 
1988. 

So far, the Sinai has bad none 
of the attadcs on foreign visitors 
by Muslim extremists that have 
badly hurt business at other 
tourist destinations in Egypt. 
But hotel executives are warned 
about security on the peninsula, 
especially since the killing in 
September of a German tourist 
in the Red Sea resort of Huigb- 
ada, on the Gulf of Suez oppo- 
site toe Sinai’s west coast. 

The biggest long-term threat 
to the Red Sea Rhaera of tourist 
promoters' dreams may be en- 
vironmental degradation — the 
result of rapid growth com- 
bined with inadequate facilities 
and services. 

Trash collection is one of toe 
worst deficiencies, reflected in v 
heaps of construction debris ' 
and refuse that dot the desert 
around Naama Bay. Wind car- 
ries plastic bottles and other 
trash into the sea, where it sinks 
to the reef and causes abrasion 
to deli c ate coral heads, expos- 
ing toe living organism to dis- ' 
ease, according to Michael 
Pearson, a Canadian consultant 
who manages Egypt’s conserva- 
tion program in southern S inai. 

The diving industry also 
takes its tofl. Divers and snor- 
kders ignore prominently post- 
ed warnings not to touch or 
stand on toe coraL Dive boats 
routinely flush their sewage 
tanks at sea, and dive boat 
crews dump their trash over the 
side, fouling the Naama Bay 
beach, hotel executives say. 

The local sea police, who are 
supposed to enforce rules bar- 
ring such activities, “just langh 
at us” when violations are re- 
ported, according to one hote- 
lier in Naama Bay. 




ASIA AND THE PACIFIC 1994: 
MERGING BUSINESS AND THE ENVIRONMENT 



The Regent Bangkok, Thailand - December 7-8, 1994 


CONFERENCE 

ORGANIZERS 


An inEemationai environment forum, designed to promote dialogue between 
government ministers, leaders of business and industry and leading environmentalists 
worldwide, with a view to harmonizing economic growth and sustainable 
development. 


For further information please contact; 

Vivien Peters, Asia-Padfic Conference Office, 
International Herald Tribune, Hong Kong 
TeL (852) 9222 1263 Fax:(852)92221190 




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Giiljf Disease Syndrome Spreads 

Genetic Mystery Persists as Birth Defects Rise 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


Page 5 


By Richard A. Serrano 

las Angela Tima Serna 

fayettev.lle, North 

^riphna — Ten babies have 
died here already. The children 

of Gulf War veterans, they died 

of heart defects and liver can- 
cer;. One was bom with no 
spteen; Three were bom dead. 

Their short lives — chroni- 
cled neatly by their mothers in 
family photo alb ums — are 
raising new fears that the mys- 
terious Gulf War Disease syn- 
drome, an unexplainable, un- 
treatable affliction that 
reportedly has touched thou- 
1 sands of those who fought in 
the desert, is now being passed 
on to the next generation. 

Here at Fort Bragg, home to 
the 8,2d Airborne Division, 
Gulf veterans’ wives learned al- 
most by accident — in ra>q»ii 
conversations — that they were 
not the only ones mysteriously 
losing children. 

The Fort Bragg experience is 
being repeated elsewhere. With 
some groups believing that as 
many as 65 percent of the chil- 
dren born to Gulf War soldiers 
.are afflicted in some form or 
^'another, veterans and their 
spouses are confused and an- 
gry. Many are refusing to have 
more children. 

Dr. Ellen Silbergeld, a molec- 
ular toxicologist at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, told a con- 
gressional hearing in August 
that scientists now know that 
men exposed to toxic chemicals 
can pass the poison directly to 
their children through semen. 
What is frightening, she said, is 
that the chemicals can cause ge- 
netic mutations to the sperm 
that helps conceive the child. 

Exactly why this occurs, she 
added, is the “question we 
know the least about.” 

Dr. Francis J. Wmckman, an 
Akron, Ohio, environmental 
pediatrician, compared birth- 
defect statistics between Gulf 
War babies and other children. 
He found a 30 percent rate of 
abnormalities among the chil- 
dren of Gulf veterans — “prob- 
ably tenfold of what is in the 
normal population,” he said. 
But as experts delve further into 
the issue, be said, more ques- 
tions pop up. 

“Can it be passed on? The 
answer is yes, insofar as we have 
hard evidence that chemicals 
v ,can absolutely decrease num- 
1 bers of sperm,” Dr. Waickman 
said. “It can create an Infant 
whose immune system does not 
function normally, and as a 
consequence this can be a cause 


for the increased incidence of 
infections in these children. But 
does this alter genes? And can 
this occur when you have severe 
chemical exposure?'* 

“To my knowledge." he said, 
“this is the first time we’ve ever 
had such a large group exposed 
to a possible large degree of 
chemicals, so we better learn 
from this whole series of 
events." 

Betty Mtikdeci, founder and 
director of the Association of 
Birth Defect Children in Orlan- 
do, Florida, is also studying the 
illnesses and deaths. Her group 
is circulating 10.000 question- 
naires to Gulf War families, all 
information that mil be dissect- 
ed to look for trends and pat- 
terns. What she hopes to deter- 
mine is whether the ailments 
and fatalities are linked to the 
war, or simply mirror society. 

Defense Department offi- 
cials say that while they sympa- 
thize deeply, they have yet to 
pinpoint a cause. They main- 
tain that unless research shows 
otherwise, U. S. soldiers were 
not exposed to life-threatening 
chemicals or other toxic agents. 

Lieutenant Colonel Doug 
Hart, a Pentagon spokesman on 
health and personnel matters, 
says some studies suggest that 
infant deaths and birth abnor- 
malities are in line with expect- 
ed percentages in the general 
population. 

Don’t tell that to the mothers 
of Waynesboro. Mississippi, 
site of a National Guard quar- 
termaster corps. There, 13 of 
the 15 children born to return- 
ing Gulf War veterans suffer 
from serious birth defects. 

Infant-mortality rates have 
suddenly increased among Golf 
veterans in the area of Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee where the 
101st Airborne Division is 
based, the area of Georgia 
where the 197th Infantry Divi- 
sion is based, and at Fort Hood, 
Texas. 

Colonel Hart said the Penta- 
gon is continuing to gather and 
examine statistics from Gulf 
War veterans and is comparing 
them with soldiers who did not 
go to the Gulf. 

He noted that a study by the 
Mississippi State Department 
of Health,, which analyzed the 
incidents of birth defects in 
Waynesboro, came up with ini- 
tial Endings that indicated a 
normal rate of birth defects for 
die group there. 

Yet the phenomenon per- 
sists. 

. About a year after the war 
aided : in early 199 1, veterans 


began complaining of rashes, 
nausea, headaches and even 
more severe ailments such as 
blood clots and cancers. Ex- 
perts remain at a loss to explain 
the problems, lei alone deter- 
mine if they are in any way 
related to service in the Gulf. 

In hearings before Congress, 
veterans charged that they were 
carelessly exposed to dangerous 
toxins und that the government 
knew of the risks and was trying 
to cover them up. 

Government officials deny 
this. But Congress passed a 
Gulf veterans aid bill that au- 
thorizes payments to veterans 
who are chronically ill with un- 
diagnosed disabilities that sur- 
faced during or after the war. 

However the bill did not ex- 
tend assistance to the veterans’ 
families, something many angry 
parents hope to push through 
Congress next year. 

Meanwhile, a special Gulf 
War registry continues to docu- 
ment the individual cases. Of 
697,000 soldiers sent to the re- 
gion, about 29,000 have signed 
onto the Veteran's Administra- 
tion registry. Similar to the ros- 
ter of Vietnam Agent Orange 
sufferers drawn up a generation 
earlier, the registry will be used 
to collate information and, offi- 
cials hope, sort out a cause. 



L Ravrendnm/Agence Francc-Pivnc 


LIKE MOTHER, LIKE DAUGHTER — Sirimavo Bandaranaike, left, Sri Lanka’s 
new prime minister, at her swearing-in Monday. She is accompanied by her daughter, 
President Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga. Mrs. Bandaranaike, 78, first 
became prime minister of Sri Lanka In 1960, succeeding her assassinated husband. 


Gaza Officials See 
Lengthy Crackdown 


Reuters 

GAZA — The Palestinian 
Authority’s crackdown on Is- 
lamic Jihad militants in Gaza, 
launched after a suicide bomb- 
ing that killed three Israeli offi- 
cers, is likely to be long-term, 
officials from both groups said 
Monday. - 

“I am sure this time is com- 
pletely different from what has 
happened in the past,” Freih 
Abu Medem, who is in charge 
of justice for the self-rule ad- 
ministration, told Israel Army 
Radio. 

The authority has rounded 
up activists from the militant 
Hamas group several times in 
response to Israeli pressure 
since Gaza came under self-rule 
in May. They were released 
within days. 

But Mr. Abu Medein said the 
smaller Islamic Jihad bad 
“crossed a red line” when its 
members jostled the Palestine 
Liberation Organization chair- 
man, Yasser Arafat, out of the 
funeral 10 days ago of a Jihad 
activist who had been killed in a 
bombing for which all Palestin- 
ian factions blamed Israel. 

Both Hamas and Islamic Ji- 
had oppose Mr. Arafat's peace 
deal with Israel 

The Palestinian police chief. 
Brigadier General Nasr Yousef. 


said his forces had angled 120 
jihad members and had orders 
to go on arresting. Mr. Abu 
Medein put the number of ar- 
rests at 160. Security sources 
said some 230 members and 
supporters of the group were on 
lists to be detained. 

PLO officials and Jihad sup- 
porters said they expected the 
detentions to last longer, and 
even spoke of Jihad members 
being brought to trial f° r °*‘ 
fenses against public order. 

Officials said scenes of armed 
Jihad activists burning flags 
"Iranian-style” in the streets of 
Gaza last week had angered 
Palestinian leaders. 

“It appears Islamic Jihad is 
posing a challenge to law and 
order." Mr. Yousef said. 

One Jihad supporter attribut- 
ed the curreni crackdown more 
to Mr. ArafaL's attitude than to 
Israeli pressure on him. 

“It is Arafat himself who 
wants to break us." he said. 


23-Year Coma Victim Dies 

The Associated Press 

TOKYO — Y asuo Sato, a car 
crash victim who had beep in a 
coma for 23 years, has died of 
heart failure at 45. officials in 
northern Japan said. 


Saddam the Spender: 
APalatial $1 Billion 


By Michael R. Gordon 

He w York Tuna Serna 

WASHINGTON — U.S. of- 
ficials trying to maintain sup- 
port for economic sanctions 
a gains t Iraq have disclosed that 
since the end of the Gulf War, 
President Saddam Hussein of 
Iraq has spent what may be as 
much as 51 billion on palaces 
and presidential retreats 
around the country. 

At a time when many Iraqis 
are destitute;. Iraq has not only 
repaired the damage allied 
bombings did to government 
palaces during the 1991 war, 
but is also expanding than and 
building new ones, according to 
American intelligence reports. 

Madeleine K. Albright, the 
U.S. representative to the Unit- 
ed Nations, plans to raise the 
issue of the conspicuous spend- 
ing on Iraq’s palaces as part of 
the campaign to ma int ai n eco- 
nomic sanctions on Iraq, an is- 
sue that has divided the allies. 
The information was released 
just before the embargo is to 
come before the Security Coun- 
cil again. 

■ Though Iraq has also done 
much to restore its electrical 
.grid, public services and roads 
and bridges damaged m the 
war, the work on the residences 
for the elite underscores the 
contrast between rich and poor 
in Iraq, a nation of 20 million 
people where robberies are on 
tbe rise and even middle-class 
Iraqis are selling their furniture 
to make ends meet. 

U.S. officials say the woes 
will triple the number of resi- 
dences for the government elite, 
which indude a presidential 
palace at LakeTharthar that is 
£ore than four times larger 

than the White House. 

American officials contend 
that Iraq has failed to meet all 
UN demands for lifting eco- 
nomic sanctions that were im- 


p ointing io uiv — ' 

K ay Iraq is crying poverty 
even as leaders squander money 
on themselves. 

«Thc fact that Saddam Hus- 
sein is spending hundreds 
millions to build palacw and 
refusing to use the hmnanitar- 
ian program the United Na- 
do^basauthwized shows the 

at SI billion, though one Ameri- 
can expert said that is, at test, 

Cr Thel5ecurity Council has au- 


thorized Iraq to sell up to $1.6 
billi on of oil under UN supervi- 
sion, with much of the proceeds 
going for food and medicine. 
ButLraq has refused, saying the 
resolution is an infringement on 
its sovereignty. 

Critics of the sanctions policy 
also cite the opulent lifestyle of 
Iraq’s rulers. They say that the 
palace construction shows that 
top Iraqi officials are firmly en- 
trenched and have managed to 
insulate themselves from the ef- 
fects of the embargo, leaving 
ordinary Iraqis to suffer. 

In an effort to lift the sanc- 
tions, Deputy Prime Minister 
Tariq Aziz, of Iraq is to meet 
with Mrs. Albright, who is Se- 
curity Council president this 
month. He is expected to pre- 
sent a declaration of Iraq’s for- 
mal recognition of Kuwait. 

France and Russia, which 
support Iraq’s position, want 
the Security Council to lift the 
embargo in six months. Iraq 
owes the Russians billions, 
which they hopes to recoup 
from Iraqi ofl‘ revenues, while 
France also sees the possibility 
of lucrative deals with Iraq. 

Rut the United States and 
Britain have firmly opposed 
lifting sanctions, arguing that 
Iraq has not completely dis- 
mantled its programs to devel- 
op weapons of mass destruction 
and has refused to renounce ter- 
rorism or refrain from repres- 
sion at home. . . 

Western officials also insist 
that Iraq has kept property sto- 
len from Kuwait during its oc- 
cupation. Mrs. Albright plans 

• to tell the Security Council that 

the UN has seen Kuwaiti vehi- 
cles and scientific equipment in 
Iraq, according to James P. Ru- 
bin, spokesman for the U.S. 
Mission to the United Nations. 

In addition, U.S. officials 
note that the Iraqi forces that 
menaced Kuwait last month 
were equipped with captured 
Kuwaiti equipment, including 
more than 200 Soviet-made ar- 
mored personnel carriers Mid a 
battalion worth of American- 
made M-I09 artiHeiy pieces. 

As described by American 
officials, the presidential com- 
plex at Tikrit contains at least 
13 palaces and a lake that was 
created by diverting water from 
the Tigris. 

U.SL officials said that two 
new wings with elaborate arch- 
ways have been added to anoth- 
er residence, identified as Iraq $ 
Republican Palace. At the new 

presidential pato the ^ce 

has been more than doubled. 



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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 

OPINION 


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INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PUBUtHFO WITH THK NW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


( Tale of Two Embargoes 


When must the United States go with 
others on a foreign policy issue, and when 
must it insist on its own policy? The Clin- 
ton admini stration has offered an ostensi- 
bly helpful formula to sort out America’s 
interest — multilateral when it can. unilat- 
eral when it must. But these words do not 
so njuch guide as evade decision. Take the 
current case of the two embargoes. 

In Bosnia, U.S. advocates, centered in 
but not confined to the new Republican 
victors in Congress, have pushed to arm 
the Muslim-led government. In deed, if 
not so much in word, the administration 
has responded discreetly; it is sympathet- 
ic to Bosnia but fearful of expanding and 
Americanizing a war on which no one has 
a political handle. But now the adminis- 
tration has gone out on thin ice. It does 
not (yet) break the United Nations arms 
embargo on the Bosnians, but it mil no 
longer assist others in enforcing iL Wheth- 
er this position is a firebreak or a bridge 
to a unilateral lifting hinges on events to 
come. Meanwhile, the step severely 
strains the cohesion that America. Rus- 
sia. France, Britain and Germany need to 
provide an alternative to unchecked war. 

It also riddles the American effort to 
enlist allied support for another embargo 
that the United States unambiguously 
supports. We refer to Iraq. Russia has 
finally persuaded Saddam Hussein to 
recognize Kuwait. Since Iraq had already 


moved to satisfy UN terms on disarma- 
ment, Russia, France and others now 
seek to lift the international sanctions on 
the regime. This is wrong. 

First, other UN conditions remain to 
be met; on releasing Kuwaiti prisoners, 
property and military equipment, and on 
halting repression of Iraqi Kurds and 
Shiites. Then, although America's friends 
may itch to resume commerce with Bagh- 
dad, die resident dictator remains a re- 
gional menace. By forming and leading 
the coalition that undid his assault on 
Gulf oil, the United Stales earned a fair 
claim for allied respect of its judgment on 
Gulf security. By flouting the allied ap- 
peal to uphold the Bosnia embargo, it 
undermines its Iraq claim. 

On a political and humanitarian issue 
like Bosnia, where its role is secondary, 
the United States needs to listen careful- 
ly to its allies, who are up close and 
taking the risks on the ground. On a 
strategic issue like the Gulf, where its 
role is primary (as its response to Iraq’s 
recent intimidation maneuver under- 
scored), Washington should expect a cer- 
tain deference from its allies. Bill Clinton 
would do well to make the distinction 
clear. It would help him escape the em- 
barrassment of asking friendly govern- 
ments to support one embargo while he 
spurns their request to support another. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Price of the 'Contract’ 


Republicans have pledged to vote with- 
in 100 days of taking control of the House 
on a “Contract With America." a package 
of 10 bills that offers government reforms, 
tax cuts and deficit reduction. Newt Ging- 
rich. the likely next speaker, has vowed to 
honor the pledge promptly. 

Voting on the contract will be easy. 
Paying for the package will not. The 
social and economic costs could be stag- 
gering. Mr. Gingrich could find himself 
undermining the Republican governors 
who now run every large state except 
Florida. His contract threatens programs 
that big-stale governors need for large 
pockets of disadvantaged residents. 

The contract includes proposals to 
fight crime, reform welfare, restrict child 
pornography, reform product-liability 
laws, impose term limits on Congress and 
give the president veto power over indi- 
vidual items in spending bills. The chief 
budget-busters are proposed tax cuts that 
would greatly reduce federal revenues 
and a constitutional amendment to re- 
quire a balanced federal budget 

Tax cuts on capital gains, families with 
children, corporate investment, retire- 
merit savings and Social Security benefits 
would cost, according to Republican esti- 
mates, about $40 billion a year for the 
first five years. Thereafter, because of 
tricky provisions, the costs would soar, 
probably doubling to $80 billion a year. 

The biggest hit would come from elimi- 
nating the deficit which would require 
Congress to cut $140 billion from the 
budget. The contract would knock about 
$200 billion a year out of a $1.5 trillion 
budget This will be hard. The Republi- 
cans must pay interest on the federal debt 
($200 billion) and will not cut Social Secu- 
rity ($350 billion), defense ($280 billion), 
pensions ($70 billion) or most of Medicare 
($200 billion). That leaves at most about 
$450 billion in other programs from which 
to find tire $140 billion cut. 

To put matters in perspective. Congress 
has yet to summon the courage to cut $3 


billion a year to pay for the international 
trade accord. Representative John Kasich 
of Ohio, in line to lead the House Budget 
Committee, is one of the few to present an 
honest list of specific cuts. But even his list, 
which would take on every vested interest 
in Congress, amounts to about $35 billion 
a year — only a fourth of tire distance to 
thegoal line set by the contract. 

The contract would almost certainly re- 
quire huge cuts in federal spending on 
education, job training, student loans and 
mass transit If Washington abandons 
these programs, many of which target the 
disadvantaged, governors of large states 
will be confronted with an ugly choice. 
Pete Wilson of California, William Weld 
of Massachusetts, George Pataka of New 
York and John Engler of Michigan could 
either stand aside and watch needy resi- 
dents suffer — or raise taxes. Mr. Pataki, 
of course, has pledged to cut taxes. 

Senator Phil Gramm brushes the pro- 
blem aside by proclaiming that Republi- 
cans are not rushing to eliminate worthy 
expenditures; instead they intend to 
switch spending decisions from Washing- 
ton to families. The Republicans would, 
for example, reduce federal housing and 
education programs while simultaneously 
reducing taxes on families with children, 
thus allowing the families to finance their 
own housing and education needs. What 
Mr. Gramm does not say is that his tax 
cuts would be spread widely but his spend- 
ing cuts would pummel the needy. 

If Republicans push their contract past 
President Bill Clinton into law, they will 
have to find huge cuts in Medicaid, stu- 
dent loans, medical research and nearly 
every other federal program. 

Some programs, like wasteful farm 
subsidies, deserve to be eliminated. But 
the cuts required by the contract would 
go beyond any reasonable definition of 
waste and fraud. Even those who voted 
foT the Contract With America may not 
be pleased by its punishing nature. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The Choice Is Rangoon’s 


Burma’s State Law and Order Restora- 
tion Council is one of the world's most 
brutal, least legitimate regimes. It seized 
power by massacring democracy demon- 
strators in the streets of Rangoon six years 
ago. Since then it has ignored elections, 
cooperated with drug lords and waged a 
relentless war against democratic political 
leaders, university students, Buddhist reli- 
gious activists and the ethnic minorities 
who make up more than a third of Burma's 
population. This grim dictatorship is now 
being courted by countries eager for new 
economic opportunities in the world’s 
hottest boom region. These include many 
of Burma’s Southeast .Asian neighbors 
and much of the European Union. 

To the east. Thailand makes refugees 
fleeing repression feel unwelcome. To the 
north, China provides military aid, con- 
sumer goods and diplomatic support. 
America stands almost alone in principled 
opposition to the regime, denying it ami- 
narcotics aid and development assistance, 
blocking loans from international banks 
and criticizing it in international forums. 

But these steps have limited effect. So 
this month the Clinton administration dis- 
patched a diplomatic emissary to offer the 
regime a choice. It can soften its tyranny 


and enjoy better relations with the United 
States, or it can continue its thuggish ways 
and have Washington step up the pressure. 
Rangoon is still weighing its response. 

Deputy Assistant Secretary of State 
Thomas Hubbard asked the council's 
strongman. Lieutenant General Khin 
Nyunt, to respect internationally recog- 
nized human rights, admit United Nations 
and Red Cross observers, end forced la- 
bor, fight drug trafficking, devise credible, 
democratic procedures for a return to con- 
stitutional rule and free, unconditionally, 
the democratic opposition leader and No- 
bel laureate Daw Aung San Suu Kyi as 
well as other political prisoners. 

Progress on these points could lead to 
warmer relations, eased sanctions and 
renewed cooperation against drugs. No 
progress would lead Washington to 
broaden U.S. sanctions and push for an 
international arms embargo. Some of Mr. 
Hubbard’s points resemble the human 
rights conditions that the United States 
earlier tried to apply to China, then 
_ dropped. This time the administration 
appears more united and serious. That 
leaves the next step up to the State Law 
and Order Restoration Council. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



International Herald Tribune 

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Bosnia Bums While NATO Soloists Fiddle Fantasias 


W/ASHINGTON — Bosnia bums, 
W while NATO plays a sweet but 
unrealistic song of expansion and new 
unity on its fiddle. 

The war in the Balkans is again lurch- 
ing toward violent escalation. But the 
European and American governments 
allied in NATO seem powerless to halt 
today’s tragedy. Instead the politicians, 
diplomats and generals who bead the 
world’s most powerful military bureau- 
cracy talk and posture about events far 
over the horizon. 

Their talk is about the future of NATO 
and how it will take in new members, 
expanding to provide the best of all fu- 

The cost of renewed failure in 
Bosnia ivoidd be devastating . 

tures for Eastern Europe, Ukraine and 
even Russia. Designing utopia in time for 
high-level diplomatic conferences in De- 
cember is the priority task in NATO’s 
foreign affairs ministries. 

Urgent action by NATO to stop Eu- 
rope’s bloodiest and crudest conflict 
since World War IT is blocked by politi- 
cal differences within the organization. 
And the Clinton administration’s sym- 
bolic decision to stop enforcing the arms 
embargo agains t Bosnia will significantly 


By Jim HoagLand 


aggravate those differences and create 
new strains in the alliance. 

The Nov. 1 1 announcement of a uni- 
lateral U.S. withdrawal from an already 
leaky embargo will add no protection to 
the Bosnian Muslim government in Sara- 
jevo as that regime faces the final offen- 
sive proclaimed the same day by the 
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic. 

To be fair. Bill Clinton’s embargo ac- 
tion is not designed to change the battle- 
fidd situation. It is part of a complex 
campaign of pressure and incentives that 
Washington is applying to the Serbs in 
Bosnia and Belgrade — and to America’s 
NATO partners and Russia as well — to 
get a negotiated settlement to die war. If 
Die campaign works, the administration 
will score a major diplomatic triumph. 

Hope that it works. The cost of re- 
newed failure in Bosnia now would be 
devastating in human and political terms. 

The visible gap is growing between the 
alliance’s rhetoric about unity and pur- 
pose and its ability to act in a real crisis 
outside its original purpose of territorial 
self-defense. That disparity undermines 
public confidence in NATO as it renews 
talk of taking in new members by ex- 
panding eastward to include former So- 
viet satellite nations. 


I can recall no time when the gap 
between talk and the ability to act was 
greater in NATO affairs, or when public 
perceptions were more at variance with 
the ideas on the minds of NATO’s key 
figures. The alliance’s leadership is deep- 
ly involved in behind-dosed-doors dis- 
cussions about NATO’s future that would 
shock their countries' citizens if they were 
tape-recorded and played on the air. 

The discussions center on questions 
such as these: Is it enough to extend 
NATO’s guarantee (and thus America’s 
nuclear umbrella) to the Czech Republic, - 
Poland and Hungary by making them 
NATO members? Or must the guarantee 
and umbrella also cover Ukraine? And 
Lithuania and its Baltic neighbors, Esto- 
nia and Latvia? Would pushing the front 
line of NATO defense to the eastern 
frontier of Poland and stopping there 
send a signal that the Baltic countries are 
outride NATO’s defensive perimeter and 
that Russian reform is lost? 

This debate proceeds at a time when 
every NATO government is cutting back 
on defense spending, reducing the size of 
its armed forces and emphasizing eco- 
nomic and physical security for its citi- 
zens at home. The sense of spreading 
schizophrenia in policy is amplified by 
the public support that these same gov- 
ernments extend to Russia, the presumed 
threat to Eastern Europe. 


Washington and its allies assure the 
world publicly that Boris Yeltsin's govern- 
ment and democracy are more entrenched 
every day, while making plans that have 
coherence only if they suspect that Rus- 
sian democracy will soon collapse. 

The new NATO debate about mem- 
bership is being driven in part by the 
artificial need of NATO members to 
come up with a work program for the 
North Atlantic Council meeting of for- 
eign and defense ministers in mid-De- 
cember. The NATO debate is also central 
to the December summit of the Confer: 
onfif* on Security and Cooperation in- Eu- 
rope in Budapest, which President Clin- 
ton may attend. 

But serious discussion of extending 
full NATO nuclear protection to former. 
Soviet satellites, especially to nations on 
the Russian doorstep, is still premature. 
The new Republican majorities in the 
House and Senate should think twice, 
before whooping through tough-sound- 
ing language about expanding NATO to 
face down the Russian bear, as Jesse 
Helms may be tempted to do. 

That would require a lot of money, and 

muit 


a lot of public 


for new military 


support 

forces in Europe. The smoke rising from 
Bosnia shows how little stomach mere is 
among allied governments to provide ei- 
ther commodity now. 

The Washington Post. 


An Asia-Pacific Trading Bloc Could Be Good for Outsiders as Well 


J AKARTA — The leaders of 
the Asia-Pacific region — in- 
cluding Mexico, the Uni Led 
States and Canada, which have 
joined in NAFTA— are meeting 
in Indonesia to discuss the 
strengthening of Asia-Pacific re- 
gional trade links. 

The concept of regional trad- 
ing blocs provokes serious doubt 
in some parts of the world, and 
this is understandable. Coun- 
tries that are not part of a given 
customs union or free trade zone 
naturally worry that their trade 
with members of such regional 
groups will suffer. However, re- 
gional trade blocs are neither 
good nor bad per se. What mat- 
ters is how they operate. 

If regional blocs comply with 
the strengthened rules of the 
World Trade Organization — 


By Carlos Salinas de Gortari 

The writer is president of Mexico. 


that is, if they do not create or 
increase trade barriers to third 
parties — then they will have a 
positive effect on world trade. 

In addition to eliminating ob- 
stacles to trade among their 
members, regional blocs tend to 
create, rather than divert, trade. 

Moreover, by promoting liber- 
alization among member states, 
regional blocs encourage liberal- 
ization with the rest of Die world. 

Regional trade blocs can thus 
have a significant impact upon 
the development of the interna- 
tional trading system. If such 
blocs are dosed, their impact 
will be negative. However, if re- 
gional trade zones are properly 


managed, and are expansive in 
nature, then they can be the 
building blocks of a more open 
and free world trade system. 

The trends are promising. 
With some exceptions, free trade 
zones have demonstrated a clear 
tendency toward expansion. 

The European Union is consid- 
ering the possibility of agree- 
ments with countries in Northern 
Africa, the Middle East, Eastern 
Europe and Latin America. 

In the Western Hemisphere, 
the North American Free Trade 
Agreement, Mercosur (compris- 
ing Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay 
and Uruguay) and the Group of 
Three (Mexico. Venezuela and 


Colombia) are forming a free 
trade mosaic that should con- 
verge to create continentwide 
free trade. 

Likewise, through the frame- 
work of the Asia-Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum, the 
Asia-Pacific basin becomes effi- 
ciently integrated. 

The risk always exists, of 
course, that one or several of 
these groups will be tempted to 
resort to protectionist measures. 
It is thus important that the mul- 
tilateral trading system be strong 
enough to prevent thaL In this 
regard, the creation of the World 
Trade Organization represents a 
significant step forward. 

In addition to managing an 
increasing number of members, 
the World Trade Organization 
will have to address inter-region- 


al relationships. It will have to 
follow closely the processes of 
liberalization in eacn region, and 
identify ideas and methods that 
might be applicable at the multi- 
lateral level — or, when neces- 
sary, detect and prevent devel- 
opments that could jeopardize 
the coexistence and convergence 
of trading principles. 

All the APEC members gath- 
ered in Indonesia are fully com- 
mitted to ratifying the Uruguay 
Round trade agreements in time 
for the World Trade Organiza- 
tion to take force on Jan. 1.1 am 
thus confident that the results of 
the APEC summit will benefit 
the multilateral trading system 
and the world as a whole, consti- 
tuting a building block, not a 
stumbling block, to freer trade. 

© New Perspectives Quarterly. 


The Mandate Has Moved Into Gingrich’s Conservative House 


W ASHINGTON — Bill Clinton re- 
mains president for foreign affairs, 
but the center of power in domestic af- 
fairs, both in voting strength and intellec- 
tual energy, has shifted from the While 
House to the putative speaker of the 
House, Newt Gingrich. 

America's first elected half-term presi- 
dent has only himself, his wife ana their 
political advisers to blame for this un- 
precedented power division. 

When Mr. Gingrich sought to nation- 
alize local elections by submitting a plat- 
form of clear, conservative promises. Mr. 
Clinton foolishly agreed to escalate the 
midterm elections into a stark choice 
between Reaganism and Clintonism. 

He publicized Mr. Gingrich's “Con- 
tract With America," warred happily 
against it on the campaign trail, nuked i t 
by misleading the elderly into fearing for 
their Social Security, and laid his leader- 
ship on the line. As a result, as tbe Chi- 
nese say, he lost the Mandate of Heaven. 

Keeper of the voters’ mandate is now 
Mr. Gingrich. Since the election, the fu- 
ture-shocking history teacher from Geor- 
gia has been forthright, at times eloquent, 
in articulating his policy goals to a much 


By William Safire 

•JO" i r. 

wider audience. Counterproducuvelv, he 
added a few ungracious and dated shots 
at the “counterculture" and media elite, 
which gave losers not still shell-shocked 
their chance to demonize him. 

But consider why some of us think of 
him as Newt the Beaut 
Not so long ago, the 435 House mem- 
bers were served by a staff of 3,000; 
today, aides and hangers-on have bal- 
looned to 20-.000. and are an integral part 
of the government-intrusion problem 
(the Congress makes regulations for idle 
hands). Mr. Gingrich has pledged to cut 
staff by one-third, and as speaker he will 
have the power to deliver; that example 
should induce the Senate to do the same. 

He will also deliver in the House 
on term limits and a balanced-budget 
amendment too. along with the line-item 
veto that will give the president greater 
power to break up costly legislative pack- 
age deals. We shall see how many Demo- 
crats join Senator Robert Byrd, prince of 
pork, to thwart the will of the people. 
That element of Newt's First 100 Days 


will be aimed at restraining and disciplin- 
ing the way Washington does political 
business. What about the way the federal 
government then helps the average fam- 
ily cope with modern social and econom- 
ic life? The trick, according to Newtono- 
mics, is to let people keep more of what 
they earn to spend the way they want. 
But that’s selfish, say liberals; what 
about compassion for the poort 

That takes us past the easy stuff, like 
health-insurance reform and tax fixes to 
encourage marriage and parents' support 
of children, to the hard part: welfare 
reform and — want a new long word? — 
disen ti demen tarianism. 

The Clinton notion of welfare reform — 
a make- work requirement after a couple of 
years — is a far cry from what Mr. Ging- 
rich and Senator Phil Gramm have in 
mind. They can show how welfare to the 
able-bodied has bred dependency, and 
they believe that the way to discourage 
unemployed single mothers from having 
more children is to make it unprofitable. 

Does this mean allowing little kids to 
starve to provide a disincentive? That is 
where Newt starts muttering about or- 
phanages, as if the nation is going to let 


Oliver Twist in the wind. No; draconian 
threats may be needed to break the old 
patterns, but cooperation can find a way 

— none dare call it compromise — to 
quickly transform welfare to workfare. 

Libertarian conservatives like me re- 
coil at the intrusiveness in Newt's call for 
a “voluntary” school prayer amendment 
He is being inconsistent on his bedrock 
principle of individual responsibility. If 
parents want to imbue their children 
with spiritual values — as more should 

— the parents should take the kids by 
(he hand to Sunday School and not fob 
off that family duty on educators em- 
ployed by local government. 

But we don’t have to agree with Newt 
down the line to admire the boldness of 
his futurism, the energy with which he 
mobilizes his forces and the joy he takes 
in upsetting the apple cart of’ power in 
the nation’s capital. 

The transfer is only temporary, of 
course. One of these days, a president will 
offer a competing vision of public support 
for persona] freedom. Could even be Bill 
Clinton. But for now, the Congress pro- 
poses and the Congress disposes. 

The New York Times. 


Tread Carefully in Linking Workers’ Rights to Trade and Lending 


G ENEVA — The United 
States is in a predicament 
over the link between workers’ 
rights and trade. Earlier this year 
Mickey Kantor, the chief U.S. 
trade negotiator, tried to place 
tbe issue on the agenda of the new 
World Trade Organization, suc- 
cessor to GATT, and won agree- 
ment to debate the issue. Bul po- 
litical pressures forced the 
Clinton administration to drop 
workers* rights from its proposed 
fast-track negotiating authority 
for future trade negotiations. 

It had already de-Iinked Chi- 
na's human rights performance 
from the annum U.S. renewal of 
most-favored-nation trade status. 
And after threatening Indonesia, 
on human rights grounds, with 
withdrawal of trade benefits, the 
administration chose to avoid a 
showdown in the run-up to Bill 
Clinton’s visit to Indonesia for 
the meeting of the Asia-Pacific 
Economic Cooperation forum. 
Meanwhile, Congress has passed 
a bill making observance of work- 
ers’ rights a condition for lending 
by the World Bank and other 
multilateral financial institutions. 

The ambivalence of the U.S. po- 
sition is drawing fire at home. 
Abroad it is causing weariness 
among smaller nations, and con- 
tributing to uncertainties and ten- 
sions in the world trading system. 

If workers’ rights are to be 
linked to trade, there should be a 
clear understanding of the scope 
and limits of such action. 

Developing countries' low 
wages are often perceived as a 
sign of labor exploitation. (Near- 
ly 100 years ago. the protectionist 
lobby m the United States raised 
a similar cry against the “pauper 
labor of Europe") Bui wage lev- 
els vary between countries de- 
pending on several factors: the 
supply of labor relative to other 

resources, labor productivity 


By Bimal Ghosh 


levels, and other circumstances. 

When Asian or Latin .American 
countries export labor-intensive 
goods, relying on the comparative 
advantage of low-cos( labor, they 
enhance world trade, and all 
countries benefiL 

In Germany, the average hourly 
wage in manufacturing is $24.90. 
In the United States and Japan, 
tbe comparable rates are $16 to 
$17. Are American and Japanese 
workers exploited? Regulatory 
measures cannot ensure uniform 
wage rates any more than they can 
equalize national incomes. 

The fear that low-cost exports 
from labor-surplus countries could 
cost jobs in industrial countries is 
another source of confusion. 

The developing countries' share 
of manufactured exports has risen, 
but it is still a small part of the 
industrial countries’ imports. 
America’s trade with low- wage 
countries (where wages are less 
than half of those in the United 
States) equals only 3 percent of its 
gross domestic producL The main 
causes of unemployment in the 
industrial countries lie elsewhere. 

After all, the world's output is 
not fixed. An increase in the out- 
put of Mexico, for example, does 
not automatically imply a fall in 
U.S. production. By opening new 
opportunities, trade allows both 
countries to expand production 
and employment, each in its own 
fields of specialization. 

It is odd. In any case, to argue 
for workers’ rights in developing 
countries on the ground that this 
would prevent job losses in indus- 
trial countries or enable those 
countries to recapture their com- 
petitive edge. The argument 
misses the main point of workers' 
rights. Worse, by allowing such 
arguments to influence the de- 
bate, the genuine defenders of 


workers' rights play into the 
bands of trade protectionists and 
lose their credibility. 

Workers’ rights should be seen 
and identified in terms of a set of 
commonly accepted values and 
principles, including freedom of 
association, abolition of forced la- 
bor, and protection of human life. 

Flexibility is needed. For ex- 
ample, poor countries may be un- 
able to afford the same level of 
safety and hygiene for their work- 
ers as rich ones. Bui human life 
should be universally valued and 
respected, and at least minimum 
standards maintained to protect 
life and limb in workplaces. 

Many of these values and prin- 
ciples are enshrined in tbe conven- 
tions adopted by the International 
Labor Organization, although in 
case of infringement it has no 
power to apply sanctions. 

The limits to trade leverage in 
promoting workers' rights also 
need to be fully grasped. 

In developing countries, trad- 
able goods (toys, textiles, carpets) 
are sometimes produced in ex- 
tremely poor conditions. Bul the 
tradable sector in most of the de- 
veloping world is only a small 
part of national production. 
Large numbers of workers eke 
out a living in unorganized or 
informal sectors that are largely 
unaffected by international trade. 
What about their rights? 

If the workers’ rights issue is 
raised exclusively in the context 
of trade, that can only strengthen 
the suspicion in developing coun- 
tries that this is just another ex- 
cuse by the industrial countries 
for job and market protection. By 
and large, those employed in the 
organized trade sector are among 
the better protected workers. 

To say that to improve condi- 
tions m the trade sector will lift the 


rest of the economy is wrong. It 
will more likely lead in the near 
term to further segmentation of 
the economy and heighten soda! 
tensions by widening disparities 
between groups of workers. 

The pressures of surplus labor 
can also make it difficult to sus- 
tain preferential labor standards 
for trade-sector workers. Social 
progress will prove elusive. 

There is nonetheless an impor- 
tant advantage in planning a 
broad-ranging discussion of the 
issue in the World Trade Organi- 
zation; it can remove much of the 
confusion and demagogy that 
now surround the issue. The In- 
ternationa] Labor Organization 
should also be actively involved. 

The discussion should sharpen 
awareness about basic ILO rights 


conventions and the constraints 
that impede their enforcement 

This in turn could bring into 
focus the urgent need for the in- 
ternational community, including 
funding agencies like the World 
Bank, to take a wide range of 
developmental actions — going 
beyond the trade sector. 

Placing the promotion of work- 
ers' rights in a multilateral frame- 
work would reduce the tempta- 
tion of powerful nations to use 
labor standards as an excuse for 
unilateral trade discrimination. 


The writer, a former bureau di- 
rector in the International Labor 
Organization, is a consultant to 
international organizations. He 
contributed this comment to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


IN OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Czar lies in State 

ST. PETERSBURG — During 
the whole of today [Nov. 14) a 
dense crowd thronged the ap- 
proaches to the fortress and 
passed through the Church of Sl 
P eter and Sl Paul, in which lay in 
state the body of Alexander HI. 
In accordance with custom, meals 
were served out to the poor. More 
than fifty thousand were fed with 
a cake soaked in fruit syrup and 
mead to drink. 

1919: Reds Arrested 

NEW YORK — [From our New 
York edition:] Branding the 
Communist party as a “thnisi at 
the heart of America,” and assert- 
ing that the revolutionary pro- 
gramme of the organization was 
designed to rally a Red Guard for 

of government, 
William McAdoo. Chief City 
Magistrate, yesterday [Nnv. 14] 


held James Larkin, Irish agitator, 
and Benjamin Gitlow, formerly a 
Socialist Assemblyman from the 
Bronx, in $15,000 bail for the 
Grand Juiy on a charge of crimi- 
nal anarchy. Samuel A. Berger, 
Deputy Attorney General, said 
that under the r ulin g of Magis- 
trate McAdoo. every one of the 
7,500 Communists in the city of 
New Y ork was subject to immedi- 
ate prosecution. 

1944: British Victory 

LONDON — [From our Ne« 
York edition:] Scoring one of ‘he 
most one-sided naval victories of *4 
the war, a British naVal squadron 

consisting of two cruisers and four 

destroyers surprised ia 
convoy off the sonthwest 
Norway Sunday , nigjht 
and within a half hour/ 
up or sunk nine of 
my vessels and driwnjW^ 00 " 
.One Nazi 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 

©PINION 


Page 7 


— f-* v 


iviitteast Peace: An Envoy 
To Keep Up Momentum 

- By Flora Lewis 

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^d^^ y . com ^ fromhiablt - Isaek expect from thtar fighting 
1 ESSS? forces, and which they consider the 

i ^J^SlSSS^ that were key to their defense, is draining away, 
SFJStt** a con P le of passang to the attackers. 
aSh Si^ representatives m An article in The Jerusalem Post 

! sssct Arafat installed hnteriy critical of Mr. Rabin asked 

» JP p 3 ^ , ai ^ looking to elections if the army's capacity to fight was 
5 “21 H? 1 ®* 1 ™* autono- being sapped. It said; “Who can 

! Ig t doubt, the blame [the soldiers] for showing lack 

! ES 4 Palestinian stale. Even Syna’s of morale and motivation in defend- 
j wuy leader, Hafez. Assad, has dead- ing a shrinking homdandT 
5 2“/*?? a« “TOiwd have con- Hannan Ashrawi, the former 



Somewhere in East Europe. 
Seeking an Honest Town 


By Al Goodman 


Tor too high-risk . . . Cancel his policy F 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


ided^ although he is still holding PLO spokeswoman, reused to join 

t ana bSDtSiniOB tough. th* n«<u PalMCnian intWitn ka 


the new Palestinian authority be- 


*. people are not measuring cause of its defects in negotiatin g 
achievements as they look at the and her dete rmination not to be 
uncertain way ahead. There is even “used" in Mr. Arafat’s personal po- 


MKau. lucre is even lisea tn Mr. Arafat's personal po- 
some nostalgia for the psychologi- iitical manipulation She says 
■Ts£ aaiar times of absolute hostil- will concentrate on trying to build 
tty, like some Westerners’ nostalgia institutions of civil society as the 
for the Odd War, when- foe and essential base for dgmoe pti^ tinn 
friend were dearly labeled. Then the Otherwise, she believes, the Pales- 
hardest questions did not have to be timans’ fate is the “Arab trap” of a 
confronted, like the fate of Jewish “corrupt, incompetent, author! tar- 
setllements in territory to be ceded, ian regime” or Isl amis t ex t r emi sm 
the future of Jerusalem, Palestinian Still, after a long list of criti cisms of 
refugees. Those questions woe in- aQ concerned — the PLO, the Israeli 
soluble and could be put aside. And . government, the United States — 
.yet the leaders, cannot afford to take shn ranch trigs that the peace process 
their time. Israel will have elections “is irreversible.” 
within two years. The central issue - No doubt it is. A watershed has 


. YHznaK Kaon argues, or m sheer I he momentum needs constant re- 
military strength eschewing cooces- inforcement, and, as before, it wiQ 
, skms, as the opposition insists. Mr. have to come from America. There 
Arafat is weakened, undermined by is a need not Just for occasional 
hard-liners who say he has become a vi&ts and beaming presidential cere- 


, lackey of IsraeL 


monies but constant high-level at- 


It either one loses power, his re- tendon and discreet intervention, 
placement is likely to be a much President Bill Clinton, badly 
more difficult interlocutor for the weakened now, cannot closet hhn- 
other, probably unwilling to contin- self in Camp David to produce a 
.ue the tenuous exercise. Neither one solution, as President Jimmy Carter 
has the sage, flexible personality of did. Even if he could, the time isn’t 
South Africa’s Nelson Mandela or ripe. He should appoint a spatial 
Frederik de Klerk, able to consider Middle East representative, a high- 
the other’s needs as a part of his own profile, widely respected negotiator. 


for a larger, mutual purpose: 


to concentrate day after day both on 


^ A thoughtful Israeli .journalist the obstacles that come up and on 
who has vouched it all doseiy said: the goaL “Irreversible” isn’t enough- 
“Vietory always has a price. There The pained movement to peace has 
was victory in war in 1967, and it to be kept going. 


took us a 


tube toTmdcrstand 


O Flora Lends. 


Expecting a Geode Scolding 

I am certain that you will receive 
many letters condemning the British 
documentary producer who made 
“Hell’s Angel: Mother Teresa” 
f. People, Nov. 8). Jam equally certain 
that you will hear nothing from her. 
She will simply read the headline, 
agh, shake hex head, and then laugh 
uproariously. That is the Mother Te- 
resa I have worked with, known and 
loved for more than 14 years. 

When I was in India for a U.S. 
corporation, I met her, worked every 
spare minute at a leper colony near 
Delhi, and grew quite dose to her. I 
can claim neither fame nor power, 
but I am treated by her as she Croats 
Her Britannic Majesty. Or, perhaps. 
Her Majesty is treated as I am by 
Mother. Therein may lie the rub. 

Queens, kings, presidents, dicta- 
tors, popes, powerful people neither 
attract nor interest her. Naturally, 
she is kind to alL She does not judge. 
When riie sits with a destitute dying 
patient in India so that he can de- 
part fids world with much more dig- 
nity than he ever enjoyed in life, she 
does not evangelize or preach. She 
attempts to comfort, not convert 
Hrnriire, M uslims, animists, Protes- 
tants, atheists, wayward Britons. 
The destitute dying is of so much 
greater rank than a head of state. 
When she bathes an AIDS patient it 
is with love and tears for his suffer- 
ing, not for his lifestyle: 

She does not approve of fund- 
raising schemes and prohibits the 
collection of money in her name. 
For years, in response to my ques- 
tions and concerns about funding. 


she has said that God will provide. 
And He does, time and time again. 

She will not approve of this letter, 
and I can expect her scolding short- 
ly. But even that she manages with 
love and compassion. 

JAMES McEWEN DEWAR. 

Hanoi. 

The Reviewer's Fallibility 

Regarding “The Pope Cheapens 
His Office" (Opinion, Nov. I) by Col - 
man McCarthy: 

This is a cheap, shoddy shot at 
Pope John Paul II. Mr. McCarthy is 
entitled to his opinion, but to dog- 
matize it in judgmental infallibility 
is downright ridiculous, if not dis- 
honest. His loaded “truths” defile 
the Pope’s words, never intended as 
literature but as moral and ethical 
guidelines for humankind’s survivaL 
WILLIAM GREENWAY. 

Paris. 

A Cloud Over India 

Your coverage of the health crisis 
in India, following the outbreak of 
plague in Surat, was remarkable; 
better, in fact, than that of most 
Indian newspapers. 

Most reporters have written 
about the garbage heaps in Indian 
cities, including New Delhi But the 
fact is chat the whole country has 
become a garbage dump. The air is 
highly polluted, transportation 
often does not exist, essential 
services like electricity, water 
and telephones are often nonexis- 
tent, civic authorities are unrespon- 
sive, the police are authoritarian, 
and many politicians are corrupt. 


What a disgraceful state of affairs .® ur fc * a 
for this once-proud country. tiiat ^ 

AJITS.GOPAL. 

New Delhi. 

Defining the U.S. Interest gJJjjjlJ 

Jeane Kirkpatrick denies (hat (here Grech Re 
is a UK national interest in the Haiti “So yo 

venture ("What's This About Clinton kian?” si 
Successes?” Opinion, Nov. 1). In my who kne 
view, any contribution within the by heart, 
limits of U.S. power, expertise and We pa< 
dedication toward resolving any drid and 
problem on this planet is in Ameri- later. A f 
ca’s interest — just as forsaking such maps of 
a contribution works to its detriment Czechosli 
L BODMER. rush off t 
Zolhkon, Switzerland. newiywee 
and Lisa 

Images of Geneva while 

„ ° _ _ crowds, v 

Regarding "Geneva: Contempo- p irlfriet i ( 
rary al Last" ( Features, Nov. 5) 
by Alan Riding: Slovakia. 

Describing the inauguration of right not 
Geneva's new Museum of Modem his wife, : 
and Contemporary Ait, the article Zborm 

states that persuading the city ding cor 
“to spend money on the arts has that my < 
never been easy.” ago. Both 

Considering that Geneva has 28 different 

museums, 136 art galleries, an op- H ungar y, 
era, numerous theaters, 65 libraries, now Slo 
40 cinemas and more — thanks to birthplac 
the more than 200 million Swiss fbe pr< 
francs ($155 million) spent every die old n 
year by the city’s public authorities not on it 
and a large additional effort by the called Ba 
private sector — it looks like what lari ties. I 
Geneva really needs is to work on foothills 
the way outsiders perceive iL mine net 

STEVEN BERNARD. than a d 

• i Geneva. Grandmc 


M ADRID — My grandfather 
had a motto at his store and in 
his life: “Always be honest. Always, 
be in good taste.” I have often won- 
dered what inspired him to set that 
lofty standard. 

Presumably not New York, where 
Grandfather once lived; savvy New 
Yorkers have been known to stum- 
ble when it comes to honesty and 

MEANWHILE 

good taste. The same goes for the 
citizens of St Louis, Missouri, 
where he eventually raised his fam- 
ily. That left his native village in 
Eastern Europe. Perhaps it was 
filled with people who were honest 
and in good taste. 

I could hardly imagine such a 
town, being no strict follower myself 
of Grandfather's credo. Yet for 
years I have wanted to find his long- 
lost native village and probe it for 
truthfulness and grace. 

Our family has long maintain ed 
that the mysterious village was in 
Hangary. That is, until the night 
before my flight to Budapest, when 
my father called urgently with a sur- 
prise. The town could really be in 
Slovakia, he said, or maybe the 
Czech Republic. 

“So you actually might be Slova- 
kian?” said my Spanish girlfriend, 
who knew my “Hungarian story” 
by heart. 

We packed our suitcases in Ma- 
drid and landed in Budapest hours 
later. A friendly reporter there lent 
maps of Hungary and the former 
Czechoslovakia, but then had to 
rudi off to cover the arrival of some 
newlyweds named Michael Jackson 
and Lisa Marie Presley. 

While they attracted Budapest 
crowds, we pored over the maps. My 
girlfriend found a speck called 
Zborov (pop. 2,500) in northeastern 
Slovakia. It was a native village all 
right, not of my grandfather but of 
his wife, my grandmother. 

Zborov’s location led to a star- 
tling conclusion about the towns 
that nay grandparents left a century 
ago. Both villages have been in three 
different countries since then — 
Hungary, then Czechoslovakia and 
now Slovakia. My grandfather’s 
birthplace has changed names. 

The problem was that I knew only 
the old name, Bartfdd, and it was 
not on the maps. However, a town 
(ailed Bardejov had intriguing simi- 
larities. Like Bartfeld, it was in the 
foothills of the Carpathian Moun- 
tains. near a tourist resort and less 
than a day’s ride by wagon from 
Grandmother’s hamlet. 


It was impossible to resist a peek 
at Bardejov. 

The 250-kDometer (155-mile) tnp 
from Budapest was uneventful ex- 
cept that it took 24 hours, and we 
did not go by wagon. Budapest rent- 
al cars ware all booked, through no 
fault of Michael Jackson]*. Thatleft 
a quaint Hungarian train, an effi- 
cient Slovak bus and a crummy 
night’s sleep at a faded, former 
Communist Party hotel in Slovakia. 

Finally, in Bardejov (population 
32,000), the mystery about Grandfa- 
ther’s town was solved just before a 
tremendous thunderstorm. An em- 
ployee at the history museum ex- 
plained that the place used to be 
called Bartfeld. Turns out it was the 
old Hungarian name. 

Excitedly, I toured the former 
synagogue where my grandfather 


knew, and saw birth records (hat list 
my ancestors. Then I remembered 
Grandfather's motto. 

I searched the town for honesty 
and found no liars or tricksters. The 
locals smiled warmly at an Ameri- 
can returning to his roots. Of course, 
it was hard to gauge true intentions 
because 1 had no idea what people 
were saying in Slovak. 

It was easier to prove the motto’s 
“good taste” component. Bardejov 
has gracefully restored its handsome 
medieval plaza of burgher homes 
painted in pastel colors and topped 
with red-shingled roofs. Unesco in 
1986 was sufficiently impressed to 
cite Bardejov for its landmark beau- 
ty; that led to a slide tourist video. 

The video features unexpected ce- 
lebrities: the former VS. vice Presi- 
dent Dan Quayle and Czech Presi- 
dent Vaclav Havel. The statesmen 
were filmed in the town square while 
attending an international confer- 
ence on security a few years ago. 

The 25-minute video has a shock- 
ing flaw — my grandfather and his 
motto are not mentioned. After all 
these years, how could the town for- 
get him ? It was probably just an 
honest mistake. 

The writer, who reports from Spain 
for CNN, contributed this essay to the 
international Herald Tribune. 

Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed " Letters to the 
Editor ’’ and contain the writer's si- 
gnature, name and fid! address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject 
to editing. We cannot be responsible 
for the return of unsolicited ma- 
nuscripts. 


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J 


International Herald Tribune 


1 


\ 


Tuesday ; November 15, 1994 
Page 8 



From Zooties to Technos: Street Fashion’s Subversive Edge 







■:&£* vk ••• .* 


By Suzy Menkes 

International Herald Tribune 


L ONDON — It is half a century since tbe zoot suit 
tromboned its way into fashion on the backs of Harlem 
jazz musicians. Thirty years since the first style war was 
fought on Britisb beaches between streamlined Mods 
and black-leather-clad Rockers. The hippies' Summer of Love was 
25 years ago. Punk has come of age at 18. 

To celebrate the middle age of street style — or maybe to 
m ummif y it — the Victoria and Albert Museum in London opens 
Wednesday the first exhibition devoted to the street and its 
ectoplasmic spread into high fashion. “From Sidewalk to Cat- 
walk*' (until Feb. 19) charts the rise of hip style that led to baseball 
caps and biker jackets on the runway at Chanel, and once 
nihilistic Punk reduced to designer safety pins by Zandra Rhodes 
in the 1970s and Gianni Versace in 1993. The show ends with the 
Supermarket of Style: a rag-bag of ragga, rap and glam-rock- 
revival looks, most understood only by initiates, and giving a 
tribal identity to music cults — as street style so often does. 

A book written in tandem with the exhibition by the social 
anthropologist Ted Polhemus is more revealing, and more com- 
prehensive, about the phenomenon. “Streets.tyle” (Thames and 
Hudson. London) opens with the trickle-down /bubble-up philos- 
ophy that fashion was once set by the designers and is now often 
absorbed by them from the street But the real subject of the book 


is tbe essence of each group — some already caricatured like punk, 
hippie and grunge — others obscure. A few, like the rubber- 
wearing fetishists or “pern” (short for pervert) or the weird 
“cyberpnnks” (wearing everything but the kitchen microwave) 
seem decadent. 

But, as Polhemus says, street style is not Chanel's homeboy chic 
— rapper jeans with a gilt-trimmed jacket It is essentially subver- 
sive. 

“Street style has an edge to it It is rooted in rebellion," he says. 
Polhemus, 47, raised in a strict Methodist family in New Jersey, 
but 20 years an observer of the London club scene, says that he 
remembers the purchase of a black leather jacket as “significant 
for me, a powerful act” when such a garment was wore only on 
the wrong side of the tracks. In the V & A show, the blown-up 
image of Marlon Brando in a Perfecto jacket in the 1 954 film "The 
Wild One" encapsulates the image of the outsider, even now that 
the leather blouson is the stuff of suburban Sundays. 


W HERE did street style come from? It is a mirror image 
of a 20th-century world in which the social pecking 
order was challenged and ultimately smashed. A chart 
shows the complex family tree of beatniks and rocka 
billies, teds and technos, glam and grunge. 

Style tribes divide into those who dress up — socially disenfran 
chised African- and Hispanic- Americans in tbe 1940s creating the 
flamboyant zoot suit — lust as rappers in current times flaunt 
exterior symbols of wealth. The colorful clothes of Rastafarians, 
“rude boys” and- “raggamu£fins’’ aD trace their roots bade to 
Jamaica. 

Middle-class kids tend to dress down: Tbe hippies ngected both 
the decorous dress of their parents’ generation and the space age 
futurism erf the 1960s (which is back as the plastic and vinyl clothes 
of today’s technos). 

The overwhelming contribution of black culture to street style 
could have been better explored. The exhibition, according to Amy 
de la Haye, assistant curator of 20th-century dress, concentrates on 
Britain, a major source of street style since the 1 960s. As well as the 
Mods, Rockers, skinheads, hippies and Punks — all hyped and 
traduced by media attention — tbe show indudes lesser-known 
subcultures like Northern Soul (which gave the fashion world 
“baggies”) tbe ghoulish “Goths’' and Asian Bhangra. 


. * -V • 


— -:u;- 




Gvinopber Moore fPoflicnjaa. Oand Vowel; 'SUttlflyf • TTumci rod ttahon j 


At left, the author Ted Polhemus at Victoria and Albert show, followed by, from left: a London " rude boy’' fa] 
1980 : a Teddy boy ; cyberpunk Donna Nolan ; Versace's 1993 take on Punk, and Chanel's 1993 homeboy look, j 


“In a sense our whole culture is over — all this nostalgia, all this 
looking back,” says Polhemus. “Young people today are nostalgic. 
When we were growing up, the last thing we wanted was to look 
bade.” 


in Bangkok, 
business 
women know 
their place. 


D E la Haye says it is significant that 90 percent of the 
display is from the V & A's collection, after a recent 
radical decision to invest in street looks. “The museum 
has always focused on design that led,” she says. “It 
became important to collect what was authentic.” 

Designers have contributed their upscale versions: Yves Saint 
Laurent's beatnik inspiration; Chand’s sequin ed surfer suit; rich- 
hippie interpretations by Moschino or Dolce & Gabbana. The 
street garments have explanatory labels describing their signifi- 
cance to the wearer. The show includes rare pieces: a Teddy boy 


drape suit, a neo- Edwardian look in the 1950s. 
Everything now seems to relate to a previous 


Everything now seems to relate to a previous trend. So is street 
style at the end of the fashion road? 


Polhemus describes his own experience as a hippie (his picture 
with drooping hair and squaw headband graces the book). He 
recalls the shock of Punk when Vivienne Westwood and her 
Svengali, Malcolm McLaren, appeared with him at a lecture at the 
Institute of Contemporary Arts in the 1970s. 

Punk remains the most vivid and shocking emblem of street style. 
It grew, as all rebellions have, out of the stolid embourgeoisement of 
style and tbe need for a younger generation to thumb its noses at 
society. Grunge similarly unsettled sleek 1980s fashion and was also 
rooted in no-hope despair with the system. In both cases, there is 
something unsettling about high-fashion takes on irash-can fashion. 

“From the perspective of a kid in South Bronx or Brixton with 
no job prospects, it is rather insulting to have clothes ripped off his 
back,” says Polhemus, who would like to see those designers 
influenced by tbe street giving employment in their studios to raw 
wannabe designers. 


Yet Punk, he believes, has contributed the most to mainstreanj 
fashion, by insinuating that anything can be thrown together and 
that the clash makes music, if not harmony. We how call someoni 
who wears a head-to-toe designer outfit a “fashion victim,” whereai 
in previous eras a well-orchestrated ensemble was the aspiration! 
OnJy the poor woe reduced to wearing a mishmash of clothes, j 
The idea of dipping Into the past, recycling and borrowing 
haphazardly from different eras and styles, is not just confined tp 
fashion. Postmodernism in the arts reflects exactly the same conf 
cep is. But Polhemus still rates Punk as a seminal fashion movement 
and one from which everything since is just the aftershock. j 
“I fed quite strongly, Punk to me is like the Surrealists — once 
Duchamp had exhibited a urinal with his name on it, what was the 
point of Pop Art?" be says. “Postmodernism is not about art oi 
clothing; it is about a state of mind.” 

Street fashion is also about reverting to tribalism. Fashion ai 
the end of the century has become a life raft in a hostile society, a 4 
image to cling to in a disintegrating world, a fashion family to 


belong to, a tribal imperative. Margaret Thatcher’s infamou^ 
credo could apply equally to style: “Today there is no such thing 
as society. There are just individuals and their families.” 


CHESS 


BOOKS 


By Robert Byrne 


SHIflOV/BUCX 


G arry kasparov beat 

Alexei Shirov in the aU- 


Jtp 

T HE LANDMA RK 

OF BANGKOK 


S U iVVW I T 


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Fax Hio2> 253 h 259 Tel <0ft2» 25-1 O-ith 


The Landmark of London is the Royal Lancaster Hotel 


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Plus over 300 headings in International Classified 
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For further information, contact Philip Oma in Paris: 
Tel: (33- 1)46379474- Fax: (33- 1) 46 37 52 12 


USTERMnoi'itl. 


mum wrtn nc w vnai. mm w int ■ u* iia.ni. ■ 


grandmaster Credit Suisse Mas- 
ters Tournament. 

Nowadays it is rare to see a 
game take the course of the old 
Sicilian Four Knights Variation 
with 6 Nc6 be 7 e5 Nd5 8 Ne4. 
Most people are convinced that 

8.. .Qc7 9 14 Qb6 10 c4 Ne3 11 
Qd3 Nf5 12 g4 Nd4 13 b3 Bb7 
gives Black fully sufficient 
counterplay. Accordingly, tbe 
play usually takes a turn into 
the Pelikan Variation with 6 
Ndb5 d6 7 Bf4 e5 8 Bg5 a6 9 
Na3 b5. 

In a sprinkling of current 
gam e s, 13 Bd3 has been tried 
and also 13 Nc2 NbS 14 g3, 
neither one producing success, 
but Kasparov goes right for his 
plan with 13 Nc2 Nb8 14 e4, 
forcing the disruption of tbe 
black queenside pawn forma- 
tion with ]4...ba 15 Ra4. This is 
not uncommon in this general 
type of position, but after 

15.. .Nd7 16 Rb4!7 Nc5, it was 
remarkable that Kasparov 
could sacrifice rook for bishop 
with 17 Rb7»? Nb7. Normally, 
it takes at least a min or piece 
plus a pawn to compensate for a 
rook. 

Maybe Shirov thought that 
his line ending in 26...Qa7 
would amount to the same 
thing, but it did noL After 27 
Nd7!, defense by 27...Ra8 
would have been defeated by 2S' 
Ne7 Kh8 29 Qf7! Rd3 30 Nf8! 
Qa2 31 Ne6 d5 32 Nf5 Nd6 33 
Nd6 Qa7 34 Nc7 RgS 35 Qd5! 

Moreover. 27„Jle8 28 Bc4 
Nd8 29 N5f6! gf 30 Qg4 Kh8 31 
Nf6 Rf8 32 Qf5 Kg? 33 Qh7 
Kf6 34 Qh6 Ke7 35 Qg5 f6 36 
Qd2 is lost for Black. Shirov 
must have seen this, too, be- 
cause he gave back rook for 



THE OTHER 
MRS. KENNEDY: 

Ethel Skakel Kennedy: An 
American Drama of Power, 
Privilege and Polities 

By Jerry Oppenheimer. 542 
pages. $25.95. St. Marlin's. 


WHAT THEY'RE READING 


Reviewed by 
Amanda Vmll 


KASPAROV/WHrTE 
Position after 3 1... Rc2 


minor piece with 27_Nd8. Af- 
ter 28 Nf8 KfS 29 b5, Kasparov 
had a powerful positional ad- 
vantage with even material. 

Kasparov's 30 Qf5! looked 
toward 30...Qd 3 31 Qd7 g6 32 
Qd8 Kg7 33 Qf6 Kg8 34 Qd6 
with an overwhelming position. 

On 31...Rc2, Kasparov bored 
in with 32 Qh7!, going ahead in 
material for the first time. 
Shirov kept playing with 
32...RC4 and dropped rook for 
knight after 33 Qg8 Kd7 34 
Nb6 Ke7 35 Nc4. 

After 38 Ne3, Kasparov had 
rook and pawn for bishop in a 
beautifully integrated position. 
Shirov gave up. 



SICILIAN DEFENSE 


WUM 

Black 

White 

Blade 

KmrtOT 

SUrev 

Eup'nv 

SUrev 

1 H 

C5 

2D NC4 


2 NfJ 

e> 

21 Bd3 


3 <M 

o d 

22 Cb 


4 NcM 

me 

23 i*4 

3 Nc3 

Has 

24 Nch8 

Ra2 

8 NdbS 

d6 

25 0-0 

Rd2 

7 BN 

eS 

as 

M 

26 QO 

27 Set 

28 MS 

3S 

108 

IB NdS 

Be7 

a bs 

& 

Res 

11 BK 

U C3 

BIG 

BB7 

30 015 

31 Bc4 

13 Wc2 

NWS 

32 Qb7 

Rei 

14 >4 

bo 

33 n8 

Ktrr 

IS fta4 

Nd7 

34 iJEfi 

KC7 

18 Rb4 

NcS 



17 Rb7 

NW 

M Ral 

Mf 

IS b4 

ft 

17 Ra3 

ncl 

19 NaJ 

38 Na3 

Resigns 


I N the interests of full disclo- 
sure, let me confess up front 
that I once worked at the same 
publishing house (Viking) as 
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, 
and that after she left it I inherit- 
ed her desk chair (only marginal- 
ly less dilapidated than my pre- 
vious one) and her typewriter 
(old, but in good condition). 
Other than this, I have never had 
any connection with the Kenne- 
dy family — so what I am about 
to say about “The Other Mrs. 
Kennedy" has not been influ- 
enced by the kinds of pressure 
Jerry Oppenheimer claims were 
brought to bear on other critical 
lodes at the Kermedys. 

“The Other Mrs. Kennedy: 
Ethel Skakel Kennedy: an 
American Drama of Power, 
Privilege, and Politics” — to give 
the book the benefit of its full 
complement of subtitles — is a 
biography of Robot Kennedy’s 
widow. Actually, “biography” is 
a loose term for what this book 
represents. Ethel Kennedy was a 
tireless campaigner for her bus- 
band and his brothers, a spright- 
ly hostess in New Frontier 
Washington and a staunch, even 
gallant figure in the aftermath of 
her husband’s assassination — 
but these attributes would not 
by themselves, make her worth 
487 pages crammed with text. 

The real reason for this book's 
existence is the public’s appetite 


• Offi-Pekka Kaflasvuo, chief 
financial officer of Nokia 
Group in Helsinki, is reading 
" The Disney Touch" by Ron 
Grover. 

*“It is a very interesting look 
at how Michael Eisner changed 
Disney when he took it over 
and made it so successful Of 
course, that was before Euro 
Disney.” (Erik Ipsen, IHT) 


for gossip. “All history is gos- in-laws — Ethel is described as 
sip,” the book’s epigraph pro- making “fun of [Jacqueline Ken- 
claims, and gives President John nedvl blatantly” .mH 


claims, and gives President John ned 
F. Kennedy as the source. It bra 
doesn’t tell you where he said it. mg 


And so “The Other Mrs. jerk” — “d we hear what the 
Kennedy" provides all the dish Kennedys, or their spouses, real- 

.L . c.l ■ cn I , tr hf thmiaht nf Pfh.l Clr.U 


about Ethel Skakel Kennedy. 


There’s the wealthy upbringing 
(a mansion in Greenwich, Con- 
necticut, Fifth Avenue shop- 


sources in his acknowledgments. 
In some cases his notes list inter- 
views with named sources -j- 
friends, family or acquaintance^ 
of his subject; in many more the 
tW source is anonymous. j 

The reader is not reassured to 
discover the text littered with 
errors, of which the most obvjf 
ous *** Arc rendering of Ethel’s 
F husband's name as Robert 

L. Frances Kennedy, ihe neologism 

| “kudo" instead erf the correct 

singular, “kudos," and the auf 
thor's apparent belief that Ethel 

was related by marriage to i 

thoroughbred trainer named 
, _ , . Horatio Lauro (it's Luro — and 

n-Iaws — Ethel is described as misspelling his name is like re- 

naking “fun of [Jacqueline Ken- faring to Joe DiMaodo. In his 

nedy] blatantly" and Ethel’s field, he’s that famous), 

brother-m-iaw is quoted as call- What’s the excuse for all this 
ng Ethel s husband “that little carelessness and sleaze? Is ad 1 - 
erk and we hear what the versarial bottom-fishing a syn- 
Cennedys, or their spouses, real- on yin for objective journalism? 
y thought of Ethd SkakeL Rose Oppenheimer seems to think so 
Kennedy » *“g to have thought The fact is, outsider journal 
Pe ?? Eawf 01 ? ism, when it takes such a deter*- 
hated Ethel, his widow. Pain- minedly antagonistic view of itS 

la Seaton Lawfnrrl it minfM ac — . u: .1 l ■„ J 


nedy} blatantly" and Ethel’s 
brother-in-law is quoted as call- 
ing Ethel’s husband “that little 


dit of Ethel SkakeL Rose 
ly is said to have thought 
endthrift; Peter Lawford 


UV 4 .UVUI, imu j-ivguuc 1 up- ; — iiuucuiy amaguntsuc view oi 11s 

ping sprees, private planes, Seaton Lawford, is quoted as subject, is inherently shrill, in? 
horses, chauffeured limos). saying; and Jacqueline Kennedy satisfying and dull, dull, dull, ft 

There’s the dysfunctional -/am- Onassis is reported 10 have “felt ... 1 — . 1 — t 

flv history fa grand father, two Ethel had no class.” 


Qy history (a grandfather, two 
sisters and three brothers are 


What kind of sources does 


U 11 W Ml UUJUI o «UW " vvwwil UV/Vd 

described as alcoholics, one Oppenhdnier give for this inside 
brother as a compulsive p hi Ian - information? A certain amount 


derer whose wife burned down comes from newspaper and 
their house when she caught magazine accounts and archives, 

him in flaonnla flalinlA . U... hilt tka .4 : 


reduces its readers to the statof 
of gawkers outside a glittering 
party — and any fool knows the 
view is always better on the pit 
er side of the velvet rope. , 


him in flagrante delicto — leav- but the preponderance derives 
ing aside the second cousin who from the “literally hundreds of 

WM <vunntillw4 ln» manml kn. rwinla" rtnnimkain,a. - 


was committed to a mental hos- 
pital after killing a 7-year-old 
girl). There are the calamities — 
a sister bom with a dub foot, 
another giving birth to a severe- 
ly handicapped and retarded 
child, her parents dying in a 
plane crash, the assassinations, 
her broiher dying in another 
plane crash, her son dead of a 
drug overdose. 

We’re lold what Ethel Kenne- 
dy and her family thought of her 


people” Oppenheimer credits as 


Amanda Vaill. a biography 
and journalist Irving in Netf 
York, wrote this for TheJMadb 
ington Past. -Y; / r! . 



ttr- 








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International Herald Tribune , Tuesday. November 15, 1994 



Page 9 


JjJJJWB INDEX: 11 4.35 IS 

120 



■ AsiafPacific 

Europe i 

- Approx, waiting-. 22 % M 

CteK 124.85 Ptbvj 125.35 rgyal 

1RO 

Approx, weighting: 37% BBBE1 

Close: 1 16.41 Pievj 1 1683 WESl 




" J J A S O N 
1994 

J J A S O N 
1994 

H North Aroorica 

Latin America 

Approx, weighting: 26% RRS 

ClOGe: 96^9 Ptev- 96.14 RBSl 

150— 

Approx, weighing: 5% |§||j 

Close: 138^5 Prev.: 137.37 HytS 



7ne Mb trades US. rioter rates of stocks or Tokyo, New York. London, and 
Aroenflna. Australia, Austria, Belgium, M Canada, ChBe, Danmark. Mend, 
Franco, Qamwny. Hang Kong, Italy, Mexico. Ncthwlande, New Zealand, Norway. 
Singapore, Spain, Swatton, Swtaartand and Venarrinm For Tokyo. New Yoik and 
London, the Mac is composed af to 20 top issues In terms of market cnpHnSzebon. 
otherwise to ten top surds am tracked 


Industrial Sectors 


Pm. % 
dost dang* 


Hoi. 


Piet 
1 dole 


% 

change 


Energy \t2J32 113.32 -035 Capa* Goods 115.1 5 115.56 -035 

UtffiSes 128.05 128.10 -0J54 Raw Materials 132-47 13313 -109 

^ finance ua3 3 »3J0 -0-24 Conwmg Goode ips.12 1P4J0 *0-31 

Services 1173a 117.87-029 Meceflaneom 12232 122.B4 -0.02 

For more Information about the Index, a booklet Is available free of charge. 

Write to TrAMex. 181 Avenue Cftarfss de GauBe, 92521 Neudty Codex, France. 


Indonesia’s Free-Trade Showcase 

Home and Abroad, Suharto Sells the Same Message 


By Michael Richardson 

International Herald Tribune 

JAKARTA — When President Su- 
harto of Indonesia plays host in the bill 
town of Bogor on Tuesday to leaders 
from 1 7 other Asia-Pacific economies for 
a summit meeting on liberalizing trade 
and investment in the region, be also will 
be putting the seal on a fundamental 
restructuring of the Indonesian econo- 
my. 

Officials taking part in the summit 
meeting said Monday that Mr. Suharto's 
role was vital because or the weight Indo- 
nesia carried in the region and because 
for the first lime in major international 
trade negotiations a developing country 
was setting the pace. 

The evident enthusiasm of the former 
army general for free trade in the region, 
and' deregulation and privatization at 
home, has surprised many Indonesians 
as well as foreign officials. They recall 
that only a year ago Indonesia appeared 
reluctant to open its market more widely 
to foreign investment and competition. 

Indonesian economists and business- 
men said the shift had been made be- 
cause Mr. Suharto saw it was the only 
way Indonesia could reach its full eco- 
nomic potential as the world's fourth- 
largest nation. 


When Mr. Suharto came to power in 
the wake of a failed leftist coup attempt 
in 1965, Indonesia was one of the world's 
poorest countries, with per-capiia gross 
national product of $70. half that of 
India. In 1993. Indonesia's per-capita 
GNP passed $700 and was more than 
double India's. 

“We see the opportunity of making a 
lot of progress in our economic develop- 


The evident enthusiasm 
of the former army 
general for free trade in 
the region, and 
deregulation and 
privatization at home, has 
surprised many. 


menl by having having access to a bigger 
market and more capital, investment and 
technology," said Aburizal Bakrie, chair- 
man of PT Bakrie & Brothers, a large 
Indonesian company with interests rang- 
ing from steel pipe-making and planta- 
tions to telecommunications. “Trade lib- 


eralization is now considered a positive- 

sum game." 

Mr. Bakrie said that with trade barri- 
ers f alling around the world and with 
China, Vietnam and India undertaking 
major market-opening reforms, Indone- 
sia could no longer protect its industries 
as it once did. 

"We have no alternative but to com- 
pete," he said. “And if countries in the 
region have to compete, they also have to 
cooperate together to liberalize trade and 
investment rules." 

Mr. Suharto's support for lowering 
barriers to trade and investment in the 
Asia-Pacific region has added major mo- 
mentum to a proposal to have the leaders 
eminent in the early 1980s, Indonesia's 
manufactured exports have grown by an 
average of 20 percent a year since 1986. 

“Indonesia actually has no oLher 
choice but to support free trade," the 
Jakarta Post said in a recent editorial 
“Trading involves two-way traffic. Indo- 
nesia cannot continue to expand its ex- 
ports without opening its market as 
well.” 

In June, the Suharto government 
risked nationalist ire when it announced 
another deregulation package aimed at 
improving the investment climate. The 
measures opened up several previously 

See INDONESIA, Page 15 


Chrysler Gets 
An Ultimatum 
From Kerkorian 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Kirk Kerkor- 
ian, Chrysler Corp.’s largest 
shareholder, announced plans 
Monday to raise his stake in the 
automaker and demanded that 
Chrysler’s board take steps to 
raise the company's stock price. 

If Chrysler does not cooper- 
ate, a spokesman for Mr. Ker- 
korian said, a takeover of the 
company would be an option. 

In a letter to the Chrysler 
board, Mr. Kerkorian, chair- 
man of Las Vegas- based Tra- 
dnda Corp., said the company's 
stock performance had been 
“very disappointing.” He owns 
32 million shares of Chrysler 
stock, or about 9 percent of the 
company. 

Mr. Kerkorian asked the 
board to raise the quarterly div- 
idend, undertake a 2-for-l stock 
split, start a program to buy 
back shares and relax “poison 
provisions put in place 
’our years ago, when directors 


pill 

fou 


feared that Mr. Kerkorian’s 
stock purchases were the start 
of a takeover move. 

The provisions were intended 
to make a hostile takeover pro- 
hibitively expensive and kick in 
when a single shareholder owns 
more than 10 percent of Chrys- 
ler. 

“If by Dec. 15 the board has 
not taken action," Mr. Kerkor- 
ian wrote, “I intend to take all 
appropriate steps to pursue these 
proposals, including legal action 
to invalidate the poison pilL Like 
any shareholder, my aim is to 
enhance the value of my invest- 
ment in the company." 

Mr. Kerkorian said he had 
asked federal regulators for 
clearance under the Hart-Scott- 
Rodino Act, an antitrust law, to 
buy the additional shares. 

“I have a high degree of con- 
fidence in Chrysler, in its man- 

See CHRYSLER, Page 13 


Microsoft Plugs an Interactive Tomorrow 


OtotamaUanto Hereto Tribuns 


By Mitchell Martin 

International Herald Tribune 

LAS VEGAS — William H. Gates 3d, 
chairman of Microsoft Corp., on Monday 
presented his view of a world of tomorrow 
filled with computers and other interactive 
devices. 

Making the keynote speech on the first 
day of the Comdex fall computer trade 
show here, Mr. Gates presented a short 
action movie that featured the use of elec- 
tronics in a Seattle police drama in 2004. 

Although he did not mention Microsoft 
products, the film apparently was meant to 
show a world in which his company's cur- 
rent expansion strategy had paid off. 

Also on Monday, Microsoft announced a 
major move into the on-Bne computer infor- 
mation market. Laier this week£it is to 
provide details on its Windows 95 operating 


system, the basic software that runs com- 
puters, which will go on sale in mid- 1995. 

Mr. Gates’s movie was a murder mys- 
tery in which police officers bought coffee 
with wallet-sized computers that commu- 

U.S. software companies likely to keep 
dominating the world market Page 15. 

nicated with a server’s cart to pick and pay 
for their refreshments. In their car, a fiat- 
panel video display was used for commu- 
nicating with headquarters and providing 
maps and news for [he detectives. 

Another pan of the film showed a future 
home in which computers easily linked 
into television broadcasts, and in which 
televisions allowed viewers to pick which 
part of a newsmagazine show they wanted 
to watch and let them communicate with 
call-in shows. 


Mr. Gates said that although the indus- 
try was now selling 40 million personal 
computers a year, the convergence be fore- 
sees would ensure expanding sales of elec- 
tronic devices for years to come. 

He said computer processing chips were 
expected to continue increasing their 
speeds and memories, allowing technologi- 
cal advances to maintain their current clip. 
But his film did not show any technologies 
that currently do not exist. ' 

He called his view “digital convergence*' 
and said it would combine entertainment, 
shopping and professional advice. A key to 
this is improvements in fiat-panel televi- 
sion displays, he said. Voice-recognition 
technology also is important 
Meanwhile, the company is kicking off 
an advertising campaign to link the Micro- 
soft name with- the idea that its programs 

See MICROSOFT, Page 13 


Sybase to Buy Powersoft 
In a $944 Million Swap 

Bloomberg Blames* News ! 

BOSTON — Sybase Inc., shoring up its weakest spot will 
buy the software developer Powersoft Corp. in a $944 million 
stock swap, the companies said Monday. 

The acquisition combines the database software expertise 
of Sybase with so-called software tools, Powersoft's specialty, 
analysts said. Together, Sybase will be able to offer powerful 
database management software and the tools to let program- 
mers write other software to search through the database. 

“Sybase's biggest shortcoming in the market is tools, and 
Powersoft has the greatest tools on the market," said Christo- 
pher Mortenson, software analyst at Alex. Brown & Sons. 

In the second-largest acquisition in software history, 
Powersoft shareholders will receive 1.6 Sybase shares for each’ 
Powersoft share. 

Powersoft surged $7,875 to S69.25 on Monday, while Sy- 
base was off $2.0625 to S46J125. 


* 


Thinking Ahead /Commentary 



By Reginald Dale 

Intbmatidaal Herald Tribune 

W ASHINGTON — The old 
battle between America’s 
commercial and fi nan c i a l in- 
terests — between Main 
Street and Wall Street — has acquired a 
new twist. Main Street has discovered 
the global economy. . 

While Wall Street trots out traditional 
reasons for the Federal Reserve Board to 
continue to raise interest rates. Main 
Street is deploying powerful new argu- 
ments to the contrary. Even though it 
may not prevail. Main Street is right to 
accuse Wall Street of being out of date. 

Much of the battle is over familmi 
territoryi Wall Street, obsessed with the 
mice of Treasury bonds, says a stiff rate 
increase is needed to thwart inflation 
stemming from fast economic growth-, u 
the Fed doesn’t act now. it risks losing its 
inflation-fighting credibility. 

Main Street, more interested in mak- 
ing money in the real world, says there is 
assign of inflation in the economy and 
thatanother round of rate increases nsks 
causing a recession in 1996, which, it 
points ont for good measure, just hap- 
pens to be an election year. 

But who is living in the real world. 
Main Street says Wall Sheet has no idea 


the United States is massively in debt and 
must humor the bond market, right or 
wrong, to maintain its creditworthiness. 

In Washington last week, two policy 
groups, the Economic Strategy Institute 
and the Economic Policy Institute, as- 
sembled a battery of experts to present 
Main Street’s case. 

The case begins with the point that 
increasing worldwide competition is re- 
ducing costs for American business and 
making it much harder to raise wages 
and prices in the United States. 

Domestic shortages of labor or of fac- 
tory capacity — traditional causes of 
inflation — are no longer so rdevanti 
U.S. companies can now shop around to 
find supplies, labor and production facil- 
ities elsewhere. 

In many industries, prices are now set 
by the global market, and low world 
prices are holding American prices 
down, said Jerry Jasinowski, president of 
the National Association of Manufactur- 
ers. Wall Street traders, he added, are 
ignorant of the “extraordinary manufac- 
turing revolution" that has transformed 
American industry. 

Thanks to computerized production 
techniques. U.S. companies can make 
higher-quality goods at lower prices. “In 
other words," Mr. Jasinowski said, “we 
can now produce more with less inflation 
than in the past." 

But that's only part of the story. In a 
paper published by the Center for Na- 


tional Policy, Andrew Harless and James 
Medoff said it was no longer adequate to 
concentrate the search for inflation in 
the manufacturing sector, which now 
employs only 15 percent of the U.S. 
labor force. ~ 

In a more service-oriented economy, it 
makes no sense to rely on traditional 
manufacturing-based yardsticks such as 
capacity utilization, industrial materials 
prices, invemoiy-to-sales ratios, order 
backlogs and industrial production. 

But a broader look at the labor market 
still reveals little or no inflationary pres- 
sure. Employers are increasing overtime 
and hiring temporary workers but feel no 
need to attract labor by bidding up 
wages or offering fun-time jobs. 

What all this means is that inflation is 
unlikely to be transmitted through the 
economy by faster growth as automati- 
cally, or as quickly, as it used to be. 
Although Wah Street's inflation fears are 
rooted in experience, many of the lessons 
of the past no longer apply. 

Ironically, the biggest cause of infla- 
tion today may be the interest-rate in- 
creases that were in traded to prevent it. 

The problem is that the Fed is watch- 
ing not just inflation but also inflation- 
ary expectations, even if they are totally 
unreasonable. Unfortunately, as long as 
the United States needs the bond market 
to finance its debts. Wall Street’s irratio- 
nal fears are likely to override Main 
Street’s sober analysis. 



Cross Rates 


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1 


Page 10 

MARKET DIARY 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


U.S./AT THE CLOSE 


Bonds Help to Lift 
Blue-Chip Shares 


I VnAMdolgcIhtn 




j Bloomberg Business News 

• NEW YORK — U.S. stocks, 
^buoyed by rallies in bonds and 
Abe dollar, posted their biggest 
[gain in two weeks amid expec- 
tations that the Federal Reserve 
[will raise lending rates Tuesday 


than SO baas points. They said 
a bigger increase was needed to 
convince investors of the Fed's 
resolve to rein in inflation. 


For now, however, optimism 
that a rate increase will make 
doUar-denominated assets such 
as bonds and stocks more ap- 
pealing offset concern that 
higher rates will hurt stocks by 
slowing the economy and cor- 
porate-profit growth. 

Alcoa and Kodak together 
accounted for almost 12 points 
of the advance. Alcoa, which 
Friday declared a 2-for-l stock 
split and lifted its common 
stock dividend by 12.5 percent, 
rose 2ft to 83ft. 

Kodak shot up 1% to 47ft 
after a Prudential Securities an- 
alyst raised his investment rat- 
ing to “buy” from “hold." 

Chrysler was among the big- 

f st gainers, as its shares soared . 

to 47ft after Kirk fCerkorian, 
its largest shareholder, said he 
planned to raise his 9 percent 
stake and urged Chrysler to buy 
back stock. 

The Nasdaq Composite In- 
dex jumped 6.06 points to 
768.18. It was buoyed by Mi- 
crosoft, which dosed up 2ft at 
64ft. 


| - U.S- Stocks 

'and shore up confidence in U.S. 
[assets. 

• The Dow Jones industrial av- 
■erage climbed 28.26 points to 
•3,829.73, more than retrieving a 
i Friday loss and registering its 
'biggest since a 55.51 -point 
[rally on Oct. 28. 
i Advancing issues led declin- 
'ing shares by 6 to 5. Volume 
‘was a moderate 260.42 million 
shares, up from 218.43 million 
on Friday. 

The dollar rally also under- 
pinned bonds as the yield on the 
benchmark 30-year Treasury 
bond slipped to 8.07 percent 
from 8.15 percent on Friday. 

Many economists expect the 
■Federal Reserve to vote to raise 
the target rate on federal funds 
by half a point to 5.25 percent 
oil Tuesday. 

" But some traders said stocks 
‘could fall Tuesday if the Fed 
Idoes not raise the rate by more 



Dow Jones Averages 


I EUROPEAN FUTURES 


low Lost on. 


Metals 


Mul awn 3833X3 3798.10 383979 +3846 
Ttnu 1475X6 1484M 1471.56 1482J4 + 1IL4B 
U18 T77JM 17776 176.71 VTA +073 
Comp 127078 127873 1267-53 1377.09 * 874 


Standard IPoor 1 * Indexes 


Industrials 

Timm 

Utilities 

5 W 

SP TOO 


HM Low Close M 

W ^ « Hfi 
its 


NYSE Indexes 


254.94 25*25 25*84 +1J9 
322.97 32882 322X1 +2.19 
J27X1 226X7 227 jOB +049 
20026 198.96 300.13 +T.17 
20080 199J6 300X1 +095 


Close Pie* 

Bid ASK Bid 

ALUMINUM (HIM erode) 

Dollars per metric ion 
Sot 186850 186958 184750 

Forward IB82J» 18605® 1857X1 

COPPER CATHODES (High Grade) 
poWcn Mr metric too 
Spat 278140 2783 50 2725X1 • 

Forward 275040 375240 368740 : 

LEAD 

pouvs per metric toa 
Spat 66650 66750 66440 

Forward 58440 68540 68150 

NICJCBL 

Dollars per metric taa 

Scot 731040 752040 730540 

forward 763540 764040 742540 

TIN ^ _ 

Del has per metric ton 
Ml 622000 6235JH 618040 

Forward 632540 633048 627040 

awe (Spe d* HW» Grade) 

C olt ers per metric toe 

ami 114650 116750 114140 

Forward 119240 119250 11*5X0 


hh|i Low Last Settle CL'vc 

I 11^1=1 

EM. volume: 1)510 . Open tnt. 9WS7 
BSE NT CRUDE OIL HPE*._ .. 

UAdoitoPefbarraHotsofUNIbwiTt* 

S^BI liS » 13 =K 

£ iss tts=a 

I 1 1 1 i=! 

NOT nIt: H.T. N.T. lAW^P 35 

EM. volume: 69580 . Open W. 188703 


Paramount Helps Lift Viacom Profit f- 

r ara i w iu* r Vtacom Inc. said Monday that 

iEfSdSU. «**“» * iB acquaUon of 

. /i.^.MH«i/<otinns InC. .... . 


prom soww W4 u«- : — 7 ‘ 

Paramount from S22 million a year ago. 

. profit jumped to $327.3 m^ion ir^ ^ j mflhoo. Viacom 

Revenue quadrupled to $2.1 3 buu comparable, however, 

said the wopm^ ■ owreSSip of Paramount 

effective July 7. 


effective July 7. 

Sony and Philips to Develop Disks 

NFW YORK f Combined Sony C«p 


Sony Corp. and 
t they were worfc- 
siandards for an 


I NASDAQ Indexes 


Financial 

HM Lew Close Chaise 
MMOHTH STERLING CUFFED 


Stock indexes 


Composite 

Industrials 


NYSE Host Actives 


76741 76455 
77654 77195 
71053 70855 
9055a 90 xsa 


AmExp 
Owyslr 
WUMaT 
TdMex 
GnMotr 
PtOMr 
Fanwis 
Kmart 
SFePCs 
Praxair 
. PopstC 
MIN 
GnGrtti 
EMC] 
DTE 


Mtai 

Lam 

Lost 

Che. 

31N 

■■ \ l;i 

31% 

— % 

48% 


40% 

+2% 

26M 


23U 

— % 

MV. 

1.,'i 

53% 

—1% 

39 

K r i 

38% 

— % 

42T. 

61M 

<2% 

+ 1 

29 




16V. 

15M 

15% 

— % 

16H 

16W 

16% 

‘ — 

21 

19» 

21 

4% 

zrv. 

FTl 

37% 

+4fc 

6V, 


6% 

■ 

306k 

f VI 

20V. 

— % 





31 V, 

JO* 

31% 

+% 


e ra mm — 

682.03 67942 


76751 +559 
77654 +354 
709 Ji? +aii 
902.96 —252 
BB9X3 —0-29 
68153 + 056 


AMEX Stock Index 


Mah LOW Last Os. 
649.13 44850 44872 +058 


Dew Jones Bond At 


20 Bands 
loutinttg 
10 Industrials 


NASDAQ Most Actives NYSE Diary 


^Prospect for Rate Rise 
‘Sparks a Dollar Rally 


Cbais 

Pwrsoft 

Sybase s 

Mkxfts 

Cblron 

imal 

TetCmA 

MD 

Oracles 

BayNtws 

Informix 

Novell 

Mamarax 

OF&R 

Aiwiec 


i 

tfloh 

34% 

73% 

Law 

32% 

67% 

Last 

33% 

69% 

CbS- 
* % 
+ 7% 

47V. 

46 

44V» 


i'Vc W 


62% 

64% 

+ 3% 

*TT~ 

76% 

73% 

74% 

+2% 

, \',V 


60% 

63% 




22% 

13% 

+ % 





+ % 

i 


43% 

44% 

+ 1 

27% 

24% 

26% 

23% 

26V t, 

23% 

-Vi, 
— % 

.yz 

18% 

18 

1B% 

t-% 

•iT< 

% 

Wn 

Ih* 

17% 

+ *lB 

— 3V. 

' rWr 



42% 

+i% 


Advonoed 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
NewKktas 
New Laws 


8388488- Ptm 01)89 PCt 
□oc 9359 9354 9358 — 041 

MM- go B« KM -042 

Jan 9217 92X9 92.14 — 042 

SCP 9174 9156 9174 — 042 

Dec 9141 9L33 9151 —053 

Mar 91 .17 91.11 91.17 -042 

Mi 9097 9093 9099 -041 

Sop 9051 9077 9053 + 041 

Me 9058 9052 9068 UnciL 

MV 9057 9051 9057 UficTt- 

M 9053 9049 9853 + 841 

SS 9051 9045 9051 UnctL 

EM. volume: 50539. Open hit.: 900464. 
MMONTH EURODOLLARS (UFFE) 
n mlllloB - pH M188 pet 
D8C NT. N.T. 9397 + 053 

Mar N_T. N.T. 9356 +043 

jot h.t. N.T. n.9& + oj» 

Sep NT. N.T. 9258 +044 

EM. volume: 0. Open tat.; 4397. 

3MONTH EUROMARKS (UFFE) 

DM1 mlUloa-ptsef lMpct 
Dee 9455 9453 9454 + 041 

Star 9446 9453 9455 +002 

Jan 9451 S3 9450 +042 

Sep 9394 9359 93.92 + 044 

f£r 9355 9351 9354 +003 

MCT 9321 9324 9327 + 043 

SET 9X5S1 92X5 S3JB) +042 

Mr 9275 9273 9274 + 041 

SSc 9253 9251 9252 + 051 

Mir 9252 9250 9241 Urtch. 

Jan 9252 9251 9251 Uneh, 

i s 9223 9271 9271 +041 

EM. volwne: 55739. Open tat.: 706.763 


Hiah Law Close chops* 
FTSE 180 {UFFE) 

■25 per tadox pom 

SS£ W. *NT. 31155 + 21 A 

ST N.T. N.T. 31364 +104- 

EM. volume: 953*. Open Inf.: 51267. 

CAC4B (MAT1F) 

T949.» —740 

ss *** "ss w = | 
ss "sa ras =a 

5CP N.T. N.T. 199150 —650 

EM. vatu me: 16564. Open tat.: 62560. 


enhanced muitimedia coi^ia^ pro duci feedback from 

The companies said thw vwe would corn- 

computer hardware and software makers. ^ ru» 

bine audio, text, a U.S. unit of Toshiba 

• Toshiba Amenca Consran^P^to^a^^ motemc- 
Cvp svd *i* a 
dia television, a f or use with inteaclive multime- 

(Bloomberg Reuters) 


dia applications ana vioeo 

Toys ’R’ Us Sets 125-Store Expansion 

would ooen as many as 125 stores next year. , 


Sources: Main. AssotfafKf Press. 
London InTt Financial Futuna Exdhanoe. 
Inti Petroleum Bxctmm. 


Dividends 


fm iir-T Per Apr) Rcc Par 

IRREGULAR 

vovoaeur MN Mon c 5236 13-20 12-30 


dong-term enp gains- 

STOCK 


REVERSE STOCK SPLIT 


35AOWTH PIBOR UWATIF) 
FFSmHnon-MoTiOBPCt 
Doc 9478 9476 9476 —051 

(tar 9357 9352 9353 -041 

JOn 9347 9X42 9344 UTKh. 

3^ saw <m,9 9312 +841 

DM 9251 9278 9251 +801 

Mar 9256 9253 9256 + 042 

-Jon 9271 92 39 9331 +042 

Sen 9312 924* 9312 +052 

EM.vofume: 18,178. open tat.: I8&I31. 
LONG GILT (UFFE) _ 

08408 -PM A Mads of WO pet 
Dm 101-36 181-02 Wl-23 +0-12 

Mar 100-23 MO-21 100-29 +0-12 

EM. volume: 37768. Ooen ini.: 105.983 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (UFFE) 
DM B8480 - Pts Ot 188 PCI 
D8C 9052 90.10 9028 +021 

Mor 8953 8970 8976 + 023 

EM. volume: 102758. Open InL: 2084«9. 
18-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT IF) 
Sf M "-«2“ , r 0 74 11)42 -« 

r # iss -h 

SCP N.T. N.T. 10842 —0.12 

EM. volume: 96701. Open Int.: 148790. 


AMEX Diary 


Compiled to Oar Sioff Frcnt Dispcidto 

n NEW YORK — Expecta- 
tions that the Federal Reserve 
,Board will raise interest rates 
Tuesday and forecasts of a pro- 
^ business Republican congres- 

Foreign Exchange 


The data convinced traders 
that a 50-basis-point rate in- 
crease “is enough for the time 
being,” said Paw Farrell, man- 
ager of strategic currency trad- 
ing at Chase Manhattan Bank. 


AMEX Most Actives 


Unchanged 
TaW issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


xional agenda lifted the dollar 


“against other major currencies 
Monday. 


Monday. 

The dollar rallied to 1-5446 
Deutsche marks from 1.5313 
DM on Friday and to 98.300 
-yen from 97.725 yen. The dollar 
■rose to 53095 French francs 
-from 5.2640 francs and to 
M. 2972 Swiss francs from 
-J 3831. The pound weakened to 
$1.5865 from $1.5969. 

The U.S. central bank is 
Svidely expected to raise interest 
rates by at least half a percent- 
age point after its policy-mak- 
ing Open Market Committee 
meets Tuesday. 

... An increase of that size 
^should be enough to calm inves- 
tor concerns about inflation, es- 
pecially after the drop in pro- 
ducer prices in October 
‘reported by the government last 
week, analysts said. 


Julie Grands taff, a portfolio 
manager with Ballard, Biehl & 
Kaiser, a San Francisco money 
manag ement firm, said many 
investors had bought dollars to 
guard against being caught 
short of the currency after the 
Fed's meeting. 

“A lot of this was kind of a 
matter of clearing up positions 
before the FOMC meeting,” 
she said. 

The dollar also was buoyed 
by political promises of lower 
spending, lower budget deficits 
and steady growth from Repub- 
lican legislators. 

“The market is responding to 
weekend announcements from 
the Republican hierarchy that it 
wants a balanced budget, deep 
reductions in entitlement spend- 
ing and investment-related tax 
cuts," said David De Rosa, di- 
rector of foreign exchange trad- 
ing at Swiss Bank Corp. 

(Bloomberg, Knignt-Ridder) 


ViocB 

XCLLM 

vloc vrt 

Olsten 

CobeMn 

ARC 

USBknci 

Hon 

GoylCn 

RovtUOs 


VaL 

Hah 

LOW 

Lost 

14405 39% 

39% 

39% 

11146 

i% 

1 

1 

10480 

lVu 

1 % 

1% 

6Z75 33% 

27% 

33 

5748 

9 

7% 

8% 

5353 

4% 

3% 

4V„ 

4987 

8% 

7% 

1 

4451 

33% 

32% 

33% 

4373 

9 

B% 

8% 

3480 

4 

3% 

3W„ 


NASDAQ Diary 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
Now Highs 
New Lows 


i Btomerica Inc i for 2 reverse spin. 
Mlcroferra Inc 1 lor 30 reverse spirt 


STOCK SPLIT 


Prlntranfx Inc 3 for 2_SPlit. 
Regal Cinemas 3 for 2 spill. 
Steean Co 3 for 1 »fll. 


INITIAL 

Scientific All n Q 415 11-30 12-14 

INCREASED 

PM Mississippi O 4875 11-30 12-15 

NFS Find Co O -If 11-25 1S-U 

Simon Co O 72 12-1 12-15 

SPECIAL 

Budchead Amtr - 640 11-21 12-1 

OMITTED 
j Spelling Entr Grp 

REGULAR 


would open as many as izj swi» 

The «Sd’s largest toy retailer said profit rose 12 percent from 
a year a^o to MT^Sffli^ Sales for the quarter rose 1 2 percent to 

that have beenop«. at h«« •?« « 

percent in the United States. Outside the VmieAl toites, the 
oSapany said poor local economies contributed tojower sa^- 
store sales. • (Bloomberg, Km&t-Ridder) 

Low Profit Margins Hurt Kmart Net * 

TROY,. Michigan (Bloomberg) — Kmart Corp. said Monday 
its third-ouarter^raings fell 59 percent, as shoppes avoided 
apparel and other full-price goods, driving dowi profit ma^ns. 

The company said net income in the quarter fell to $39 million 
from $94 million a year earlier. Excluding discontinued opera- 
tions — the PACE Membership Warehouse and PayLess Drag 
Store eh ains — profit a year ago earnings was $104 million. 

Shawmut Buys a Barclays Subsidiary 

NEW YORK (AFP) — Shawmut National Corp. said Monday 
it pay $290 million for a U.S. unit of Barclays Bank PLC. 

Shawmut said the purchase of Barclays Business U*®dit Int 
would enable it to improve its operations in the high-yield area of 
loans to medium-sized businesses. 


I Spot Cofnmodttlas 


Market Satos 

Commodity 

Today 

Prev. 

NYSE 

.Amos 

Nasdaq 
la millions. 

Today 

CM 

268X3 

1E22 

23154 

prev. 

COWL 

267.18 

2872 

273X7 

Aluminum, lb 

Copper electrolytic, lb 
Iran FOB, tan 

Lead, b 

Silver, tray at 

Steel (scrap), tor 

Tin, lb 

Zinc, lb 

1X9 

2UD0 

0X4 

5.165 

127X8 

4.18*2 

15814 

1X9 

21100 

144 

5.18 

127X0 

4XB24 

15814 


Industrials 


Hitt Uw UM Settle CKVa 
GASOIL (IFE) 

US. dollars per metric hm-tots of 188 teas 
DOC 15525 15329 15150 15350 —350 

In 15675 15525 1552S 15575 -325 

Fat) 15740 15600 15640 15675 —150 

Mor 15675 15640 15600 15600 - ITS 

Apr 15575 19650 15650 15650 —140 


Amer Bankers ins 
Amtr Recream Ctr 
Cambridge SApCfr 
CascadeCarp 
Citizens BcpMd 
DJbrdl Bros 
I Hy p erion 1 997 Tm 
Hyperion 1999 Tm 
i Hyper tar 2005 Inv 
Morfc Cntrs Tr 
PataeWebPrmlsd 
PalneWeb Prem 
Price REIT 
RoadwnrSvCS 
St. Joe PtmerCo 
ScftenCarp 
TompkbisCtv Tr 


O .11 12-2 12-16 

Q 46 12-16 1-10 

g 48 1HI M3 

O .15 11-25 12-15 

Q 77 12-2 12-30 

O 78 12-1 12-15 

M 45 11-21 11-30 

M 45 11-21 11-30 

M 4625 11-21 11-30 

Q M 11-22 11-30 

M 467 11-21 11-25 

M 4813 11-21 11-25 

Q 419 12-9 12-30 

Q 75 1-13 2-1 

a 45 12-15 12-28 

Q .13 11-24 12-7 

Q 75 12-1 13-U 


For die Record 

Computer 2000 AG, a German computer wholesaler said it 
would take a majority stake in AmeriQuest Technologies Inc. and 
enter the U.S. computer market 
Air C awfl *» said net income in the third quarter rose to 130 
million dollars ($95 million) from 43 million dollars a year earlier, 
as revenue rose 13 percent to 1.03 billion dollars. (Bloomberg) 


Manual# p-pa ra Df la Canadian finds; m- 
mantMri a- mw fertr; *4eMf-anaaai 


Wggjawd Ben OfUcc : 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — “Interview With the Vampire” dominated 


Nymex Trading System Extending to Singapore FoUovvSi^are ^ ^^ d °° Friday dckel 


A genet Firmer- Presse 

SINGAPORE — The New 
York Mercantile Exchange an- 
nounced Monday that it would 
extend its 16-month-old over- 
night electronic trading system, - 
called Access, into Singapore, 
.the fastest-growing oil market 
in the world. ■. 

Under an agreement between 
the Nymex and the Singapore 
International Monetary Ex- 
change, or Simex, Singapore 


will become the first country in 
Aria to use the Access system, 
which already is operating in 
several UJS. cities and London. 


“The arrangement will enable 
Simex corporate members to 
trade Nymex contracts listed on 
Nymex Access, both for their 
proprietary accounts as well as 
tor their customers," the Singa- 
pore exchange said. 


oil futures exchange. Analysts 
say the arrangement will further 
enhanc e Singapore's status as an 
energy-trading center. 

In a separate development in 
Asian markets, the Malaysian 
government announced that the 


Kuala Lumpur Commodity Ex- 
change, Malaysia’s sole com- 
modity exchange, was set to win 
a four-year battle to diversify 
into financial futures trading af- 
ter agreeing to share a clearing 
house with a rival private outfit. 


1. -interview with me Vomplre" 
3 "Santa Clous" 

3 "Slargate* 

6 "Pulp Fiction” 

& "Marv SMIvFs FnmtonMeln" 
6TUeWoi- 

7. "The Specialist" 

8. "Forres! Gump" 

9. "The RNorWlkT 
la -Love Affair” • 


IWamor BrallHm) 

(Walt DHnOY) 
(Marro-GokfieYO-MoYeri 

(Miramax) 

(TrlStor) 

ruafv* ratrfl 
(WOrner Brothers! 
(Paramount) 

(Universal) 

(Warner Brothers) 


9384 million 
S20mUlkm 
185 million 
961 million 
U m HI tan V 
S4 million 
927 million 
91 4 million 
11 J million 
$1-4 million 


Nymex is the world’s largest 


TTTvT-T 7 




i i 


Agonce Urn Ptomc Nov. U 


Amsterdam 

4bn Amro HM 6170 61 JO 
ACF Holding 3670 36 


Aegon 
AhoM 
Akrn NoM 
AMEV 


GtM-BracodeG 44JD 


10740 10670 

51.10 5340 
199 20070 

7650 7670 
33 3370 
6030 6630 
137 0960 

17.10 1690 
15 15.10 


Rhotametall 

Setwring 

Stamens 

Thyssen 

Vorto 

Vcfto 

VEW 

Volkswagen 

Weiia 

DAX.tndex -J 


288 284 
96995970 

62350 619 

289 288 
3255031950 
521.1051750 

37537350 
46846650 
45645250 
1080 995 

979 


HBG 
Heine ken 


273 273 

24670 24640 


ESSL*. 3fS S| 


IN C Co land 
inter MueOw 
inn Nederland 
KLM 
KNPBT 
KPN 


Neditavd 
OceGrinlen 

PuMwed 

Philips 
Polygram 
Robeco 11240 113M 

Rodamco 5040 ...31 

Raruioo 11348 11550 

Rorefdo 
Royot Dutch 
Stork 4240 4360 

Unilever 198J0 lWJfJ 

Van Ommeren 46 463 
VNU 178 lm 

WoHers/Kluwer 12380 I23J0 

fSRissftisr 


7670 7670 
4240 4370 
9650 95JB 
79 79.10 
4640 4640 
SDJB 4948 
5570 5570 
55 5640 

74 IS 

4550 4550 
5370 525B 
7648 75 

11240 11270 
5040 31 

11640 11550 
8270 8270 


Helsinki 


Amer-Yhfyma 

Enso-Gutiefl 

Htaitamakl 

leap. 

Kymmenc 

Metro 

Nokia 

Pohloki 

Ropota 

Sfockmann 




100 104 

as_sa 4058 
147 147 

310 315 
130 125 
149 152 

685 683 

74 70 

93 9328 
250 252 
at : 192M7 


Hong Kong 


Brussels 


Almonil 
. Arbed 
* Dor co 
BBL 
Bekoert 
. CBR 
CMB 
CNP 
Cockertll 


17750 7708 
NJL 5000 
2510 2485 
14270 4250 


Coimyt 

□elhobe 

Ej ectrohe l 

Eledrofina 

Forth AG 

GIB 

GBL 

uevaert 

GlaveriMH 



Oaw Prev. 
Form 272 271 

GEC 382 242 

Corn ACC 545 5.70 

Glaw» 310 647 

Grtmd Mel 609 «47 

GRE 149 148 

Guinness 6M 664 

GU3 553 555 

Hanson 272 270 

Kllbdown 175 173 

HSBC HKJB9 772 7^ 

ICI 772 757 

Incticape 623 444 

Kingfisher 470 468 

Lodbroke 152 158 

Land Sec &3H 319 

Ldporte 7.14 742 

Lastno 146 144 

Legal Gen Grp 6M 6» 

Lkjycts Bank 5JBJ 557 

Marks Sp *42 398 

MEPC 613 616 

Natl Power 695 449 

Natwest 542 3.14 

NthUVst Water 5JB 574 

Pearson 3T7 316 

P&O 670 333 

PlUUngtan 146 143 

PowerGen 550 5SH- 

Prudential 345 316 

Rank Ora 449 603 

Reckitt Col 552 S64 

Rmflond 665 664 

Reed inti 7.71 747 

Reuters 474 673 

RMC Group 9.93 1002 

Rolls Royce 179 IT? 


BCE Mobile com 
Cdn Tire A 
CdflUtllA 
Caacods i 
Crowns Inc 
CTFlnlSvc 
Gaz Metro 
Gl WeMUfeco 
Hees Inti Bcp 
H udson 's Bay Co 
Imosco Ltd 
investorsGrp Inc 
Labatt (John) 
LobtowCas 


One Prev. 
BCE MobUe com 42Vb 4SM 
11 11 
23*. 2316 
m 7M 
1BW IB, 
MVfe U 
1216 1216 
2tm 2016 
13M 1316 
Hudson's Bav Co SBi. Si 
Imosco Ltd 3BM 3BVk 
Invasion Gn> Inc 159h 15% 
20 2BV« 
20 % 20 % 

1916 T9 Ik 

Natl Bfc Canada 9k. m 
Osbawo A 1M m 

Pancdn Petralm 43 4216 
Power Cora MM law. 
Power Flnl 2916 2916 
Quebccar B 16M UH 
Rogers Comm 8 1» 19*4 
Royal Bfc Cda 2tM 281k 
Sears Canada Inc 81k 81k. 
Shell Cda A 43 vj 44 
Seufflam Inc 14» 14*6 
STetcn A BV> ipb 

Triton Flnl A 390 390 


Sbne SlngaporeB 
Stag Aerospace ■ 
Stag Airlines fom 
Sing BusS vc 

Stag Land H 
Stag PetlniH 
Stag Press torn 
Stag SMpblde ■ 

Sine Telecom i» 

Straits Steam 
Straits Trodlngl 
Tat Lee Bank ■ 
UId Industrial ■ 

Utd (Ysea Bk fam 
UldOVeas Lund 


ChnePrev. 
1.11 149 

9 7H f 73 

1650 V640 
9.M 9.15 
395 flJO 
143 241 
27 JO 27.18 
254 252 
346 310 
558 545 
34* 376 
440 440 
1A5 1X1 
1310 15LB0 
390 259 




Stockholm 


ReckinCal 
RedBand 
Reed mtl 
Reuters 
RMC Gnmn 
Rolls Royce 


Rattimn (until 626 470 

Royal Scot 446 4X7 

RTZ BJ7 8J3 

Safcullurv 649 609 

Scat Nencas 543 341 

scot Power 352 333 


352 353 

147 148 

Severn Trenl S52 559 

Shell 743 743- 

5let» 5X9 SM 

Smith Nephew IX* 1X4 

SmlttiKIInc B 619 613 

Smith (WH> 451 454 


Sun Alliance is 

Tale A Lyle 62 

Tosco 2X 

Thorn EMI 9.9 

Tomkins 27 

T5B Group 24 

Unilever 114 

UM Bbcuirs 11 

Vodatane 2.1' 

War Loan V& 
wencome 
Wtiltbreoa 
waitamsHdgs 
wnHsCaman 

FT 38 lodes t.ZMIXO 


U4 371 i 
*40 630 

2X6 2X8 

9.97 W45 

271 118 

128 247 

1140 11.16 

3.13 111 

117 108 


Air UauMa 
Alcatel AWhom 
Axa 

Bancalre (del 

Bic 

BNP 

Bauyoues 

Danone 

CUrretowr 

C.CF. 

Cerus 
Charaeors 
Cimenis Franc 
Club Med 
Etf-Aautfainc 
Euro Disney 
Gen. Eaux 
Havas 
imefat 

Lafarge CoPPee 
Leirand 
Lyon. Eaux 
Oraal IL'l 
L.VJMJL 

Matrn-Hoctirtte 

MktieUnB 

Moulinex 


AGA 
AseuAP 
Ajlra AF 
Atlas Copco 
Electrolux B 
Ericsson 

Easel te-A 

Hondrisbank BF 
Investor BF 
Norsk Hydro 
Pharmacia AF 
Sandvik B 
SCA-A 

S-E Banker AF 
SkancBa F 

SkansMBF 
SKFBF 
StoraAF 
Troltaborg BF 
Volvo BF 

pJ5f5£f?iB5$i W1U ’ 


SUmazu 
Shinatsu Cham 
Sony 

Sundtomo Bk 
SumHanaOnn 
Sum) Marine 
Sumitomo Metal 
TatoeiCara 
Takeda Cham 
TDK 
Tellta 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tapper Printing 
Tatar Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

Yamalchl Sec 
a; x 100 

Nikkei 225 : 19262 


On** Prey. 
704 710 
1890 1940 
5750 5750 
1740 1720 
569 568 

845 845 
342 344 
616 414 

1180 1180 
4518 4SM 
565 548 

1110 1120 
2800 2780 
1430 1430 
753 762 

704 781 

2110 2110 

699 60S 


The IHT Pocket Diary 
Fits In The Palm 
Of Your Hand. 


Toronto 


Amcor 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bond 

Bougainville 


6160 6170 
1362 1370 
9540 9590 


Sydney 

8X0 8X9 
3X6 174 
1848 1944 
140 340 
rill* 076 0.95 

JOT 607 607 

Coma Ico 5.10 5.12 

CRA 17X4 1750 

C5R 653 *52 

Fosters Brew 1.14 1.14 
Goodman Field ITT 149 
ICI Australia 1070 1048 
Magellan 2.10 2.15 

MIM 2X8 259 

Nat AuM Bank 10X8 10XS 
News Corp 548 556 

Nine Network N JL NA 
N Broken Hill 323 344 
Poc DuntoP 349 196 
Pioneer Inn 340 342 

Nmndy Poseidon 244 277 
OCT Resources ITS 148 
Santas 374 377 

TNT 2X5 2X7 

Western Mining 7X0 7X9 
Westpoc Banking 620 444 
Woods Ide 459 4X4 


necfieei «o *as 

ftayato Beige 4^ 4760 
Soc Gen Banque 7528 7490 
Sac Gen Beta kwe 2195 2160 
Safina ii2sa 132 sd 

Satvav 14925 15000 


Madrid 


Troctebel 
t)CB 24380 24100 

union Mltriere 2665 2700 

Wagons Uts 6010 6010 




FranMurt 


AEG 

AUOM 5EL 
Allianz Hold 
Altana 


26527150 
2416 2375 
650 647 

730 740 


5ayer 34SJO 348 

Bay. Hypo bank 410 488 

W veretasDk 459 tsi 
■BBC 690 NA. 

BHF Bank 39650 3*6 

BMW 776 779 

Xammerztoardi 32632350 

Continental 222 - 218 

Daimler Benz 77177150 


Johannesburg 

AECI 2850 2845 

Altocfi 100 NA 

Anuta Amor 24250 NA 

Barlows 33 3275 

Blyvaor 945 NA 

Buffets 40 42 

De Beers 99 loo 

OriefanMn 6475 65 

GencOT 1545 1545 

GFSA 120 129 

Harmon* 38 38 

HlghveM steel 34 S 

Kloof 6745 6745 

Neobank Gra 38 3775 

Rrsndfontrin 4375 4450 

Ruspial 112211150 

SA Brews 997S 99 

western Deep 1972 ^199 

gta^ta 52^:566074 


BBV 3330 3335 

Ba> Central Hhw. 2960 2978 

Banco Santander 520a 5190 

BcmeslO 189 879 

CEPSA 3385 3305 

Draaadas ung 1«40 

Endesa 5B20 5810 

Ercrus 162 161 

Iberdrola 069 851 

Reasoi 3995 3945 

Tabocalera 3590 3440 

Tetafonkta 1715 1695 


P moult prmi 
HaW.St.T™^ 


Total 

UAP. 

vaieo 


AWtiw Price 
Air Canada 
ABierlaEnerav 
Alcan Aluminum 
Amtr Barrie* 
Awenar 

BkNouaScafto 

BCE 

BCTefecomm 
Bombardier B 
Bromoleo 
Brascan A 
Cameco 
CISC 

Cdn Natural Res 
CanOccM Pei 
Cdn Pacific 
Cascades Poner 
Camlnca 
Consumers Gas 
Dofoscn 
Doman Ind B 
Du Pont Cda A 
Ecno Bov Mines 
Empire Co. A 
Foiconbrtdge 
R el ctler Chail A 
Franco Nevada 
Guardian Can A 
Hernia GoM 
Horsham 
Imperial Oil 


I PL Energy 
LakJIaw A 
Laid law B 

Loewon Group 
London InsurGp 
Macmlll Btoedri 
Magna Inti A 
Maple Leaf Fds 


j&““ : t92L5o 


Nowbriage Netw 
Nornnda Inc 
Naranda Forest 
Nwcen Energy 
N thorn Telecom 
Nova 
Onex 


Tokyo 






Sao Paulo 


AHraim 
AssHOllO 
AutosTr w fe ptW 
Bco Aorieol turn 
Bca Cummer Hal 
Bca noc Lavora 


London 


Banco dl Roma 
Bco Ambrastono 
Bca NopoII rlkP 


Dnihde Bank 7545075240 
Douglas 436 439 

Diesdner Bank 495040950 
Fddmuehle 306 305 

F KruppHaesdi 2035030250 
Harpy i wr 321 330 

Henkel S91 585 

+IOCMM 920 930 

Hoechst 32633648 

Holxmonn 861 862 

Horten 206 206 

IWKA 333 335 

Kail SOU 169X0 165JS. 

Karstodt 567SA640 

Kouthaf 461 461 

KHD 13412248 

Ktoeckner Werfce 13613850 
Ulnae 888 886 

Lufthansa 20419950 

MAN 41050 410 

Monnesmam 3977040040 
Meftdlaesell 1594015770 
MwtdiRuKk 27W 2740 

Porsche 656 665 

Prnnsag lowing 

RWE 


Argyll Group 2X9 

AssBrH Foods 5X9 

BAA 4L9S 

BAc 4X3 

Bank Scotland 2.16 


Bar days 
Bass 
BAT 
BET 

BiuoarcSe 
BOC Group 
Boots 
Bowoter 
BP 

Brit Airways 
Bril Gas 
Brit Steel 


Credits Itallano 
Enlchem Aug 
Ferfta 
Flat sea 
Flnanz Agrolnd 
Ftam e c c anico 
Fondlariasaa 
Generali Asslc 
IFIL 

Ho i cementl 


Bcsico do Brasil 1848 17X5 

B onesa o 8» &» 

Bradeseo 770 Zsg 

Brahma 2 B7 298 

Ceaik) 92 9258 

P^KSS* S S 

feSiapanwna 
Pe t robr as 1 VJ0 132 

3J3 

VgjRtoDoce 5*18258, 




Brit Telecom 157 


BTR 10S 

Cable Wire IB 

Cadbury Sen 449 

Caradon 274 

Coats Vlvella 1.97 

Comm Union 551 

CourtouJds 462 

ECC Groan 3X8 

Enterprise 011 274 

Eurotunnel 273 

Ftoons 147 


onvem 
Pirelli sna 
RAS 

Rtaasoeme 

San Paolo Torino 

sip 

SME 

Bala bod 

Standa 

Sief 

Toro Ante 


Singapore 

T650 1678 


Altai Etectr 390 385 

Asahl Chemical 742 754 

AsaMGkm 1210 1220 

Bank of Tokyo 1400 1390 

Bridgestone 1530 1530 

Canon 1758 1730 

Casio 1240 1240 

Dal Nippon Print 1730 1780 

Dolwa House , 1330 1330 

Oaiwa Securities 1260 1278 

Fanuc 4638 4580 

Full Bank 2820 2030 

Fu I Photo 2240 2330 

Fujitsu 1030 1040 

Hitachi 970 971 

HifcttM Cable 767 763 

Honda 1690 1610.1 

ItO Yokodo 5270 5270, 

Itochu 733 735 i 

jeaan Airlines 716 7is ! 

Kalima 876 865 

Konsot P ower 2350 2360 

KawasoM Steel 423 -CN 

Kirin Brewery 1030 1050 

Komatsu 916 920 

Kubota 727 731 

Kyocera 7250 7260 

Matsu Elec Inds 1540 1540 

Matsu Elec Wks 1060 1060 

Mitsubishi Bfc 2170 2140 
Mltsub Otemlcal 553 553 

Mitsubishi Elec 70S MB 

MltsuDIWli HOT 740 742 


Placer Dome 
Potash Cora Sosk 


4630 4580 

iu«i 2020 

2240 2350 
1030 1040 
970 971 

767 763 

1690 1678.1 
5270 5270 , 
733 735 i 

716 715 

876 865 
2350 2360 
423 426 

1030 1050 
916 920 

727 731 

7250 7260 


PWA 

Quebec or Pri nt 
Renaissance Eny 

Rla Alpom 
Seagram Co 
Stone Caraa Id 
Tonsman Eny 
Teiegtooe 
Tel us 
Thomson 
TorDom Bank 
TromnHa 
TransCda Pipe 
UldDomtatan 
utd Wesftourne 
WesMnastEnv 



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Adki inti B 214 214 

AUaulsse B new 634 625 

BBC Brwn Bov B 1105 1098 
Oba GeKnr B 746 778 
CS Hold kt93 B 570 572 

Elektrow B 3S6 3d 

FllCher B 1425 1435 


Mitsubishi Coro 1300 1290 




MIBTrietiHtftCo: 10264 
Previous : iraei 


Jurono Shipyard 

Kar Hkm j capei 


Montreal 


Neptune Orient 
ocaCloraipnR 


Aten Ltd l 
Bank Montreal 


14Vk 1416 J 
25 24to1 


m 
4X2 4X4 

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197 3 

2.13 2.14 
1130 1550 
7.10 7JB 
9X0 9X0 
1150 1150 


Mitsui and Co US 844 

Mitsui Marine 7*6 745 

Mltsukosnl 955 NA 

Mitsumi 1380 13<0 

NEC 1168 1150 

NGK Insulators 1020 1030 

NBdw Securities 1000 1020 

Nlooon Kooaku 935 937 

NhwanOll 688 UO 

Nippon Sleet 382 386 

Nippon Yusen MS MS 

Nissan 788 789 

Nomura 5ec 1870 1870 

NTT 6640a8650o 


JetatOlIB 80S 815 

Lana Is Gyr R 730 730 

MomnUdi B 415 410 

Nestle R 1193 1186 

Oerllk. Buehrle R 136 136 

Paroesa Hid B 1488 1465 

Roche Hdu PC 5835 5850 


570 572 

356 3 a 
1435 1435 
1990 1970 
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730 730 

415 410 
1193 1186 


680 6» 
382 386 

645 645 

788 789 

1870 1870 
6640a8650o 


goftaR tpufrHc 


107 10S 

a _ .... _ 705 701 

Schlrafler B 7450 7250 

Sutler PC 885 886 

Surveillance B 1800 1750 

Swt»BnkCan>B 361 363 

Swiss Retraw R BOO 011 

Swtssolr R 845 868 

UBSB 1205 1198 

Winterthur B 685 68S 

Zurich ASS B 1238 1233 

SBC index; 917X1 
Prey loss : 919.53 


Olympus Optical 1060 1060 

Pioneer 2500 2«n 

Rlggh 916 *20' 

Sanira Elec 559 550 I 

Sharp 1770 1770 1 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER IS, 1994 


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Page 11 

EUROPE 


uy 


or 


.4 Billion 


English Daily in Prague 

U.S. Publisher Courts Thriving Market 


-\. LONDON — Boots Co., in a 
. long-awaited move, said Mon- 

se§--ife pha m a c eutica^iMtf to 
BASF AG of Germany for 
-about £850 million (SI 4 bil- 
Hou).' 

Completion of the sale de- 
pends on approval by the 
boards of both companies and 
regulator approvals, said 
Boots, Britain s leading phar- 


crease, a share buyback, a stra- 
tegic acquisition or a 
combination of all three, said 
Alastair Eperon, a spokesman. 

Mr. Eperon said die compa- 
ny was particularly interested in 
acquisitions in the growing 
German over-the-counter drug 
market, although he said “we 
have no objection to giving it 

back to shareholders.” 

“Their avowed strategic in- 
tent is the over-the-counter 


rbacy and consumer-products health care market in Europe," 
chain. said John Richards, a Nat West 


- Boots said last year it was 
considemig. selling its third- 
largest division to focus on core 
retail operations. The division 
reported a 6 percent increase in 
sales to £228 million in the first 
half of 1994 and a 70 percent 
rise in profit, to £49.8 million. 

. /‘This deal offers exciting 
prospects for the international 
‘ expansion of our pharmaceuti- 
cals business, and for its staff,” 
said James Blyth, deputy chair- 
man and chief executive. 

“It's a very good fit, thera- 
ptatically and geographically," 
-said-Thodef Spickschen, chief 
executive of BASF Pharma, 
which holds the pharmaceutical 
operations of BASF. 

A company spokesman de- 
clined to say when the sale 
might close or what Boots 
would do with the money. Op- 
tions include a dividend in- 


New Drug Lifts 
Sobering Profit 

Roam 

BERLIN — Sobering AG 
said Monday that net profit 
rose S percent in the first 
nine months of 1994 on 
snong sales of its new multi- 
ple sclerosis chug Betaseran. 

Sobering earned 210 mil- 
ium Deutsche marks (SI 37 
milli on) in the period. Sales 
rose 14 percent, to 3.5 bil- 
lion DM. Saks of Be tar 
seron accounted for 230 
million DM of the total. 

. The company also pre- 
dicted its full-year profit 
would be up 10 percent 


Securities analyst “We would 
certainly expect them to make 
some strategic acq uisitions ** 
Analysts expressed little sur- 
prise at the announcement, and 
stock prices of Boots and BASF 
were nearly unrhangpH 

(Bloomberg, AP) 
■ Cooksori Courts Mattbey 
The British materials and 
metals companies Cookson 
Group PLC and Johnson 
Matthey PLC confirmed they 
were in merger talks that could 
lead to the creation of a £2.5 
billion company, Bloomberg 
Business News reported from 
London. 

A statement from Cookson, 
an electronic materials, ceram- 
ics and plastics company with a 
market capitalization of £1.4 
bfflion, said discussions were 
still at a “relatively early stage." 

(Bloomberg AFX ) 


By Jane Periez 

New York Tuna Service 

PRAGUE — Eastern Europe's first daily 
English-language newspaper since the col- 
lapse of communism was launched Monday 
by a young American publisher who has 
made a nam e here with a daily publication 
distributed by facsimile machine. 

The eight-page Bohemia Daily Standard 
was designed for the growing number of Eng- 
lish-speaking business travelers and expatri- 
ate b usiness executives and diplomats in 
Prague, according to the publisher. Eric Best. 

Mr. Best, 32, shows little concern about the 
current competition. There are two indepen- 
dent English-language weeklies published in 
the Czech Republic, The Prague Post and 
Prognosis. Three English-language weeklies 
erf varying quality and focus are published in 
Budapest, and there is one in Warsaw. But 
Mr. Best hopes to fill a niche for the expatri- 
ate community by providing in -depth cover- 
age of local and foreign news. 

“There’s a gap of daily news for foreign- 
ers,” said Mr. Best, who has been putting out 
bis daily fax publication. Fleet Sheet, an Eng- 
lish-language summary of the Czech press, 
since 1991. “And there's so much self-censor- 


ship in the Czech press that a truly indepen- 
dent paper will be able to say things the Czech 
press is afraid to say." 

Mr. Best, 32, says there arc many aspects of 
Czech business life and politics that need 
solid reporting. The banking system, for ex- 
ample, appears to be a prime target for ag- 
gressive news coverage. There have been sev- 
eral bank failures recently, as well as reports 
of under-the-table payments for loans. “You 
go to a bank and can get an appraisal on your 
building that suits you,” rather than the mar- 
ket value, he said. 

The Standard has a start-up editorial staff 
of 20, including the editor, Francis Harris, a 
former correspondent for The Daily Tele- 
graph of Britain. 

The paper’s debut comes near the fifth 
anniversary of the Velvet Revolution that 
toppled the Communist regime Nov. 17, 
1989. To mark the occasion, The Standard 
will run anniversary photographs and an arti- 
cle by President Vadav Havel of the Czech 
Republic. 

Mr. Best says he hopes the paper, which 
costs 10 koruny, or about 35 cents, will devel- 
op a circulation of 5,000 to 10,000. 


In Geneva, Too, the Presses Are Rolling 


Complied by Our Staff From Dispatches 

GENEVA — The Geneva Post, an English- 
language daily newspaper aimed at the thou- 
sands of diplomats, UN employees and busi- 
ness representatives working around this 
international Swiss dty, published its first 
issue Monday. 

Newspaper executives said the paper was 
starting with 15,000 copies sold by subscrip- 
tion and at newsstands. 

Its founding publisher, Jacques Werner, a 
Harvard-educated Swiss lawyer, said the new 


dail y — the first to be started in Geneva this 
century — had a good chance to succeed even 
though newspaper publishing generally faces 
difficult times. He has put nearly $4~5 million 
into the project. 

He said that he was counting on circulation 
growth in French-speaking Western Switzer- 
land and in France from the planned start of 
the World Trade Organization in January. 

Geneva saw the failure of the French-lan- 
guage daily La Suisse earlier this year after a 
century of publication. (AP, Reuters) 


Yes’ Vote on EU Cheers Swedish Stocks 


Compiled by Otm Staff From Dnpotdia bought 7.2152 kronor, after ciuc> wu^uuve, aaiu. 

STOCKHOLM — Markets 7-2828 Friday. toaTthe govero- 

bere soared Monday in edebra- Stock markets elsewhere m budget for fppg to 

turn of voters’ decision Sunday Scandinavia also rose, with Co- in /Sv woild 

to let Sweden join the European penhagen’s top-20 KFX share . J clue^owbetber 

¥“■> and rf-NHta that 0.42 percent and^ 


chief executive, said. “Now this, 
at least, is in place." 

He added that the govem- 


nere soarea Monaay m ceicura- oiock maiacu. uacwurac m ,, hiuket for fiscal 1996 to 
tiem of voters’ decision Sunday Scandinavia also ran jrithCo- 


the move would lead the govern- 
ment to cut its huge deficit. 

Stocks on the Affaersvaerl- 
den index climbed 22 percent, 
to 1,913.28. Bond prices fol- 
lowed suit, climbing 13 per- 
cent. 

The kronor rose initially, es- 
pecially against the Deutsche 
marie, but then faded. In early 
New York trading, a dollar 


index up vAZ percent, ana us- 

a46 large deficit forces a govem- 
peiceat higher. m< £ t lo sdl a lot of bonds to 

Skandia AB, the Swedish in- finance spending, diluting the 
surance company that began value of existing bonds, 
boycotting Swedish bonds four Skandia shares gained 103 
months ago amid doubts over percent on Monday, to 132 kro- 
the government’s ability to cut nor. 


investment officer at S-E-Ban- 
ken Fonder AB, Sweden's larg- 
est mutual fund-management 
company. 

Johan Evcrioef, responsible 
for Scandinavian shares at Swiss 


EU Seeks 
A Role in 
Japan-U.S. 
Trade Talks 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribune 

BRUSSELS - Europe’s trade 
chief sought to join in the Unit- 
ed States’ bade talks with Japan 
an Monday, insisting he needed 
dear proof that recent agree- 
ments between Washington and 
Tokyo would not discriminate 
against European companies. 

U.S. offi c ials have said that 
recent agreements to open Ja- 
pan’s market for insurance, glass 
and government procurement of 
tdecomrovmications and medi- 
cal equipment will not be re- 
served for American companies, 
but Trade Commissioner Sir 
Leon Brittan said Europe had to 
have a rede in monitoring the 
accord before it could be sure. 

“If that is the intention of the 
agreement, there should be no 
opposition to our participating 
in the monitoring,” he said. 

As his demand indicated. Sir 
Leon said there had been no 
progress on his efforts to estab- 
lish three-way talks among the 
parties. 

He said the nonconfronta- 
tional approach of Europe’s 
trade assessment mechanism, 
which seeks to work with Tokyo 
to identify barriers to European 
exports to Japan, would pro- 
duce results comparable to or 
better than Washington's 
heavy-handed attempts to gain 
1 measurable increases in Ameri- 
can exports. 

The strategy has borne fruit 
with agreements cm computers, 
office equipment, car parts and 
beer that are to be adopted for- 
mally when Sir Leon meets with 
Foreign Minister Yohei Kano 
in Tokyo on Saturday. 

Sir Leon said he would seek 
additional openings on aircraft 


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Sources: Reuters, AFP 


v 'jsSaEf 

Inientauannl Herald Tribune 


Very briefly; 

• British Sky Broadcasting Group PLC will sell 343 million shares 
at between 233 pence ($3.72) and 268 pence each on the Londop 
Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange beginning 
Dec. 15 . The exact offer price will be announced Dec. 8. 

• Mkhefin SCA of France said sales for the first nine months rose 
7 percent to 49.62 billion francs ($9.4 billion). 

a LVMH MoSt Heunessy Louis Vintton SA of France said third- 
quarter sales rose 1 2 percent to 6.77 billion francs. Sales in the first 
cine months rose 16 percent to 1 8.77 billion francs, 
a Olivetti SpA and Digital Equipment Corp. received approval 
from the European Commission to cooperate in Lhe field of 
reduced instruction-set computer products, 
a Eu rot un nel PLC, which operates the rail tunnel beneath the 
English Channel, said third-quarter sales totaled £3.99 million, 
compared with £2.30 million m the second quarter. For the first 
nine months, sales totaled £636 million. 

a L’Orfeal SA erf France said third-quarter revenue rose to 12.79 
francs from 9.41 billion a year ago. For the first nine months, sales 
rose 15 percent tO 30.1 billion francs. Bloomberg, Reuters. AFX 


Bank, said: “I see a potential for and aircraft engines, uyioro 
a 5 percent increase in stocks agreement on product-testing 
over the coming days.” and press Japan to ait red tape 

j that impedes imports, an area 

But others were less sure. offered to work 

Sven Arne Svemscm, M econo- ^ Unite d Stato. 
mist with United Securities, 

said that “the market has prob- He indicated he was meeting 


spending, saw the outcome of 
Sunday's EU referendum as the 
first step toward lifting the ban. 

Bjorn Wolraih, Skandia’s 


“It’s a very hopeful develop- 
ment and we were certainly 
happy to see Sweden vote 
yes,' ” said Erik Sjorbeig, chief 



ably made the most” of the stiff resistance to his effort to 
“yes” vote, so that “now we’re get Japan to reduce its current 
back to daily life.” account surplus to 2 percent of 

When it becomes a member f^sdom^c product from 
of the European Union on Jan. 14 percent last year. 

1, Sweden will be required to That is the only numerical 
follow strict EU rules on .the target Europe has proposed in 
size of its debt, budget deficits, fts talks with Japan, but Sir 


British Steel Profit Takes Off 

Compiled bp Our staff Fnm o^audia improvement in U.K- steel de- 

LONDON — British Steel mand in the latter part of our 
PLC said Monday that in- last finanaal year has contm- 
neased demand and higher sell- ued in this first half-year, and 
ing prices helped lift pretax the emerging recovery in mam- 
profit almost sixfold in the half- land Europe has strengthened.. 
year ended Sept. 30. Sales in Britain rose almost 6 

Profit climbed to £159 mil- percent; in Europe and the rest 
Hon ($254 million) on sales of 0 f the world, sales jumped 19 
£2.8 billion. A year earlier, Brit- percent 

^ • Prospects for the second hall 

arc “encouraging,’’ the compa- 
.. th. .on ny said, withdenuuid in Britain 


inflati on and bond yields. 

(Bloomberg Reuters) 


Leon said he was not prepared 
to make it a “touchstone.” 


The results were at die top 
end of analysts’ expectations. 

The chairman and chief exec- 
utive, Brian Moffat, said: “The 


and Europe expected to grow 5 
percent this year. 

(Bloomberg AFX) 


PP 'jZ. V ' 

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U.S. FUTURES 


Season Season 
HlBh LOW 


Low Close Ov OP.W 


Season Season 
wan Law 


Li m Dose Q*a Oo.tnT 


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Low aosa Chn OP.InJ 


Grains 

WHEAT tOO T) 

un u» dbcm i7*v, im un ijw iuow augj 

AX* S3! MOTH XNVh MM 3JB J92 

UMb 3.UVbMov9S 14714 17Wfc 147V* UM +102 MH 

XiaS ill JOB 136'* 3J9 13SW 1I> ^ 

145 141 Vr Sep 95 3A0 1CV* 3JO 1CW +WRMI TO 

173 1S2ViD«c95 152 153 152 1^ U* 

IMVl 134MJWW . +001^ 7 

Est.Kdn 14400 Rf5.Bfc» 19.1 J7 
FfTsooenM 71J05 OH R»7 

'ESsr sss&Tsnnrs . *»* 

UBVh ll«V5iil95 143 14S 142V4 145 +IUlMi 4I3B 

177 129 Sap 95 147 1«7> IgW ♦OBI M 

1*9 V, 155 Dec VS 154 155 154 IK 0 

EsLsoteS NJL FWlSOlM 4J02 
Fri’l open in* 34JS2 OR 784 

CORN ICBOT) SOOOOomWnwn-OBfcraBWfcang _ 

177 iUtaDeeJA 117 117% 2.1415 2.17 — MOW j9^4 

■> wv, XJOVkMV 95 1281* 12M UB 2JJTA— 74.J74 

IBS ?3D*MbyK 735* 13414 13514 
2JJ5V, 2XHA Ju! 95 24M 141 140 — IW 

2® s»« 145V. I45V. 145 14314 -OJ1 1616 

143 UW Dec 95 2 jW* 15014 Z49W Z5DV4— <L0«4 

zm\i ISOWMra-W 1S6« H’Sm 2 5& 1563*— oom* Wfi 

ta USWJuiH IBS 24» 143 1SH4— OOH4 790 

EsLstfieS 3&400 FiTl soles 37J91 
Ftrs«HtM a BMt UO T3J 
SOYBEANS ICBOT) uOOWimMnrwm-MnBerMM 
757% 5J4WNDV94 554 55115 5JS» +004 &S7 

TM 537V> JonVS 5S1W 5*5 5*0 V, U4W +OUU. 55.990 

7 AS 547M,Mcr»5 5nn fMVS iTOW S/A +0«1J 

7A5W 556 May 15 5J0V. 553 5L7BW SflW +0«Vi 

7JJAV, 543MJUI95 SB* 5BB 5B3W SBO* +Oy01K 21071 

M2 5MWaSb9S 5JB 5J0H 5B7 

4. IS 571 Sep 95 570 591 58* 590%-OOn* gl 

450V. S78WNOV9S S« 5H S.WV, fMW-OOOW 8.H4 

51* 199 V, Jan 94 6_Q5 505 503 509 —Oja 107 

a SBOWJuTw UOU 530VS 517W 517V, -0J3 3* 

total 45000 FWl-Srtet 40J519 
Fri'S open ini 1374 51 UP 407 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT) 1 00 Iona- Mn par ton 

awn i sue Dec* mn iswo lauo m.w +ojo^7m 

2B7J0 140JHJm95 1*050 141.1# M0.10 WOJO +0J0 

307 JO l*500Mra-95 14500 14530 1MJ0 14440 18,^ 

207X0 147JDMOV9S 149J0 149.60 165X0 1*9^ +020 9,9K 

h n a iw 17570 Jul 93 17149 17*20 T7U0 17*30 +540 HUBS 

mS mMMti 175* 17420 17570 J75J0 *030 3,g9 

1(270 17120 Sep 95 17730 17820 117J0 171» +520 13g 

mm i7s*aOdK ioojd ibmo mJO iwjo +0.10 mm 

10570 176JDB0C9S ldBO 10330 10200 11270 +Qa UK 

JOT 96 18550 +050 I 

EsS. total IU»0 Ff95S0lw Ulfl 
FW&OPenH 1022S7 up 485 
SOYBEAN OH. KWIT1 *5888 e M H Wg HOJw 
28L87 HNDocH 2725 2720 2727 27*1 +024 35429 

, SI SSSfn 2528 256S 2530 34J +025 029* 


—3* 5»S* 
—34 34244 
-U 0J94 
-30 W94 
—30 1.558 
— 30 507B 
—30 5114 
— 20 873 


1177 9.T7Mor*5 1145 1173 1555 1344 *W» W2» 

1X74 1BJ7MOV95 1X44 1X73 1157 1148 

13J1 10J7JU95 1139 1X47 1X31 134S +04118^ 

12B5 mVOd 95 1276 1229 1374 I2J1S +009 15432 

1U0 SSwSrM 1Z25 1228 1221 12J +IUg IW 

IMS II.WWB9M 1272 1278 1119 1278 + 0M 291 

1117 1170 Jul 9* 1X15 H.15 1S.1S 12.15 -002 W1 

Oct 9* 1108 

EstlOtaS W.73S W5 WB H7» 

Rfsopen W 14 4729 op 474 

'*^jr®rxR Hn iw 

1405 1077 Mar 95 1322 1324 1302 1306 -34 35W4 

1612 107BNMnr95 1347 1348 1330 1337 — J8 *794 

MOO 1225 Jul 95 1319 1369 1355 1360 3.*» 

15*8 1388 SeP 95 13SS 1388 1380 1383 — M US® 

]«□ 1290 Dec 95 1420 1«4 1415 1413 —20 5070 

147* 1350*40+96 1458 USS 14» M41 -» 5HJ 

1642 1 225 MOV 94 1475 M25 1475 1444 -» *73 

Jut 96 VBA —39 11 

ESLSOta* 23,591 Rtfs. sates 9 JIB 
Ffl'IWtnW & ion 

ORANSEJUICH (MCTN1 UUMIU*>canltnrta. _ ■ 

13400 85.007*0*94 111.75 112JB 11US 11175 +JJ » 

13X00 09.00 95 11529 11528 11470 115.10 +130 1SJ82 

12*25 93J»Mor9S 11970 11970 11US 118^5 +X10 SJM 

mm 97X0 Mov 95 121 JO 12275 niJD 121.45 1MB 

12X60 1 MUD Jul 95 12*45 — 0-05 

1Z7JS 107JSSCP95 127 JO T2SJS 127 J9 m»5 -030 1^9 

17450 1SWM0V95 12SJ0 135J0 12SJB J749S -030 1^4 

127 AB lKJSJon94 13590 13500 135» »4« -020 m 

MOTH 12495 —020 

EsLstMs HA. Rfs-solM 3J80 

RTicponmt 25*01 UP 437 

Metals 

HI GRADE COFFER D4CM3Q 2MNta*-an»B«r«u 

12X20 77J5M0UM 12550 12X45 124J0 

12770 7575 Dec M 11S45 WSO 12S75 127J0 +1053XW1 

194 W 7590 Jan 95 13460 12550 124*0 13570 +X» 921 

124*0 7108 Feb 95 12540 1M60 1K40 1HJ5 

I342J 73jl0Akr95 12X51 12SJB 12X59 IjBJIO +2JO IXV3 

TM3S 91 10 AW 95 12115 4 2-15 *43 

121.08 76JBMOV9S 12049 12270 12020 13140 +1» 37W 

iry an 1M.1Q Jun95 T2DJQ +131 397 

11158 7X00 JuJ 95 11085 11970 11085 119^ +175 1® 

117 JO 11140AM« IW-g + 1 .-® 

11500 79.10 Sap 9S 11550 +I-0S 179 

11300 moo Oct 95 1I5J0 11050 11059 110M +OS5 152 

115.73 OBJODecVS M ♦“» >•«* 

11170 OBJOJBnW 111A5 

11370 CUDMa-94 !»» 

109 JO 107 JO MW 96 M -0M 

Jill 94 10520 — 1J0 

Sep 94 10*70 -2.00 

EsLSMs 12JOO Frft.sMW 5471 
Fri’S open M 407*4 Ot 836 
SK.VER {MCMXI ItaWB-aonriWB 


91-17 11-08 Dec 9481-25 82-10 81-15 O-® * « 25J97 

18-09 gtFOO AAOT95R3-22 81-07 80-1* 81-0* ♦ 30 3JUO 
Est.sotoa 7J8N MtlW 3J73 
Frl's open W 297*7 ott 1* 

EURODOLLARS (CMERJ si mflBavfXsBf tOOoeJ. 
SlBWTIODedMWMa 91980 W.M 9WJ} +2!^^- 
95JB0 70740 Mar 93 9X440 9X480 9X430 9X470 +40420J7H 

94J30 90710Jun95 92940 92990 92.946 92980 ’■50 304745 

5*JS0 9l710S«p95 92J40 92500 92550 92J9B 

94280 91.180 Dec 95 w3S 9X2W «730 .TOlSSE 

mu mnatorH nuo tim K.j£ gxr® +»i*a»z 

93.180 91.950 Jun 9* 9X010 9X031 91990 WOM * JO J 32. 135. 

92570 91 040 SOP 96 91.900 91.7*0 91.080 91.W ’8011874% 

Erl. sales HA. Fri's. scies 13*568 A 

nriapanmt 2009739 on io*« -z 

BRITISH POUND (CMER) iDcrnwot- 1 «W«u*iiunn -I 

VMS* 1 /B00 Dec 94 1J936 1JM2 1^*8 1J866 -« 48.TO 

1J440 1J6MMW95 1J904 1J90* 1JH30 1TOJ — 5 W 

14380 lJ348Jun95 1^32 -« 

Est.sdes HA. Fri'S. sola* 5J80 O 

Fri'S open W 49701 UP *3 >s 

CANADIAN DfflXAR (CMB1) » rer tSr- 1 oolnf rouata fiJJBBl 
570007038 Dec 94 073*3 07380 07340 [0342 -3 J5,1» 

07405 02030 Mar 95 07376 07377 07362 07341 —3 X30J 

0.7527 06998 Jun 95 07345 07345 07340 073® -J \XX 

D743B IUH5SepVS 07344 _ SSI 

07400 OJWODBCV* 07343 B7XJB 07348 OT32B —3 70 

07235 0731 DM* 9* 073Q -3 A 

EsLntas NA. Fri'v sate 2J94 '■ 

FWsopeniir 39 UP 35 *■ 

GERMAN MARK (CMER) iprnot.IpWwiSMB J 

04731 05590 Dec 94 06524 0*527 0*467 04477 — *2 91 A® 

04745 O5910Mar95 04505 06507 04431 04489 -tf 

062*7 05980 Jun 95 04500 06510 0*500 0A5B -*2 14JS 

0*240 06347 Sep 95 0*530 —67 119 

, Est. sates HA. Fit's, uatas 13700 

F+rsocen Htf 99422 *43 

JAPANESE YEN KMOR) UWWl eetefeautesttlBOW 

OinQ4900D09523Dec 94 0.01 076] 001 024 10JJ1 01 830010205 -47 68700 

Om05«aj009*80Mar95Oin829SUn(a0eO0I(126a0J10291 -48 04» 

omo67au»w76Junw WJ1S2J -» T 1 * 

omiiTTHuninaasepvs ojhosoo —to ios 

ama3WLtno*a one m ajtiai isunasi mo too Homoto* —21 40 

CL01 093DU11 Q720MCT- W 0.01 07200 J1 07200.0 (DTBffl) JIJ DU* —70 U 
Es). soles NA. Fris. sates 10,145 

Fri’S Open Fnt 77,630 M> 885 

suns FRANC (CMER) I per Irapc- 1 ouaimumtUM 
QJ10B 0*885 Dec 94 07794 0729* 07707 07719 —88 44.104 

08136 07287 MCI- VS 07787 07787 07M* 0.7755 -89 2J13 

0X145 071 93 Jot 95 07794 07B03 0779* 07802 -90 308 

nxiss uonseefs otbo -91 * 

Esr. sates NA FTTssates 9^5* 

Fri’S open W 44333 a« 153 • 


+ 30405,988. 
+40420X78 
+ 5D$M765 
+ 50346J7i 
• 70184JSV 

tTOUOAK 

*7013X135. 
+ 801107*3, 
A 


115L50 +0X5 152 

11370 +075 1JB* 

111A5 — 020 


— 42 6^47 
-*2 1415 
—62 11 S 


Industrials 


22.91 Mar 95 25X3 254B 25-S7 2&J1 tJ-JJ 

2U5MOV95 MJO 25.15 2*80 am +0X7 14^ 

2276JUI95 3433 3443 3430 2447 + 014 8,139 


27X5 227* Jul « 2433 3462 2430 24£ +0.14 8.TO 

2770 2273AU09S 3415 3U5 34.10 34^ +010 1712 

2*35 2175 5«J 95 3405 2405 2190 2191 +072 1,460 

MM RTS Od 95 23JS 2U8 USS 2375 +025 SJ7B 

MSS ZXSODace 2140 2UH 2U0 3X48 +013 3X98 

HIS 2173 Jon 9* 2XXS +0X7 5 

Est. salat 94x00 iwtsaa J2J37 

ftfsupeniie 107X32 UP 3899 

Livestock 

CATTLB (CMER) 40888 tat- cjnhwrte 

7*30 67X0 Dec 94 7090 TlJ* 7070 7098 

7479 4AASW695 89X5 6BJB 6977 S9AS -4RW0 

>5.10 67X7 Apr 95 4MS 70.15 49X7 70.10 +0.13 

»J0 6420 Jun 9S 4577 SUO 6S7S *5X7 +WS W81 

48.18 *3X0 Aw 95 Atm 4445 6430 640 +0® 

*7X5 4420 Od VS 6112 46» 45X0 4SJ0 +005 520 

SAJ5 44X0 Dec 95 “30 7 

Est soles 7745 Fm sates UXM 
ftfsOBKlW 76.978 UP 171* 

FEEDER CATTUC (QUBD OMh,M)Hrt. 

MM 71J5N0V94 74X0 74X0 74JB MJ2 1X14 

SOlSS 71ABJOT9S 75JS 75X0 75X0 Kg 4.]H 

80X5 7835 Mv 95 71» 73XJ 73.10 7113 +ft® 1.131 

7690 TOLUApeVS 72J0 71X7 7230 72X2 +0g 490 

7UD fflXOMnyH 71X0 7115 7U0 71 JS +OJ0S 420 

7XM SSah«S 71 JO 7U0 TlJO 71 JO 1« 

71X8 49J0SW96 , 7U1S » 

EsLtuMs 7*2 Frfs.sal8* 1J16 
FtTsopbiW U44 u> 3 

*2 +om ism 

SUM aS85F8b95 37J7 37JS 3U2 36ffl -03S 11,994 

4SJ0 akWA#r« 37JS 37J7 37X5 37-79 MUB %533 

47 JB 4U7JWI95 42JS <2X5 42X0 OJS -0» 2£B 

4580 4U0JLSH 42X2 4735 42+0 4235 -085 m 

43X0 41.15 Aub 95 42X7 42X5 -4285 41X0 SO 

4050 38X00095 39 JO 39J0 30X0 39X7 +007 437 

41X5 39X0 Dec 95 41X2 41X0 41X0 41J8I +OU 74 

4280 41 JB fist! 96 42X0 4U0 42X0 *JD +015 7 

Est.Hta 0719 Fri'S. sates 5.984 
AfSOMTIint 30053 UP (33 
PORKBBJJES (OUH) taXBpBt-IMfc PWte 
*085 37X0 Fob VS 4090 4J.15 4085 41^ +0X0 1^ 

6020 37J0MOTV5 41.10 47.10 4185 XI & +0M 1JM 

61.15 3895 May 95 4SL3S X3X5 XWS XXSD +0.U 340 

5480 JOSS Jul 95 42J0 Xiao rSM AM 361 

4400 3U5ASo« 4L80 4150 4180 42X5 +0.10 00 

Est soles 1J15 RTLsofee US7 

Fri'S wen W 10,120 off 50 


30. enjoyable minutes ; 

fe” Z ipteriiafioBai iraveileis yry 57% of you have telephone 

aip abroad, coltectivety you used 


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SS ' liSSSS 5158 mi nn Sli +1J 40X63 

6040 fllxita-K B40 Si H40 TOJ +18 7X873 

606J 41 88 Mov 9S 534G 5345 530J 5318 +18 UiO 

61110 X308JUI95 5178 5418 5378 5188 +18 6.236 

103J 532J5ep9S 5444 +18 3X86 

6288 SS9jSD*c95 SSUB 5668 5528 S42 +M 8X61 

6118 5678JM96 M78 , 

<22 8 5548 Mu - 98 5443 +1.1 1.01 

5»8 5845 MOV 96 015 +1.1 1M 

<008 57488X96 SOU +1.1 

sot m sas +i.i 

Eft. solei 25800 Wi.S0l« 1BJ35 
FrTs open hit U 2J» W 3*0 

PLATWUU (NMBZJ Bima,.o*tamr»m_ 

4JSJ0 37480 Jen 95 41 180 41680 411 JO 41470 '970 1DJ34 

43980 89080 Apr 95 41780 X20JD 41780 4T9A +1W 7.1B5 

439 jn 41880 J^ +5 48*80 48400 42*80 423X0 *270 l.W 

*41 JO 422JBOd95 <2870 +2JJ SB 

2uo Jot 96 43170 +270 10 

EN. sates 1,995 Fri^. sales 2.122 
Fit's opcnW 21180 UP 322 
GOLD INaiXl loaimaL-eDanMrmviii. 

38780 3B380NDV94 

AXL3I 3X380 OecM 305X0 36670 385.10 
Jdi9S 

41180 343J0F86W MM M TO80 

41780 36450 Apr 95 39100 Wia ».« 

S jSjDAwW XOOJB 490X0 40080 

%% WS&mmmmm * . 

48L5D <1750 Hat) 94 

mia SmOJuEm 422J0 422X0 <22X0 
Aug 96 

Esf.fdet 27J00 Fri’S. 50)81 11520 
RffeBPtelir* 139810 Off 6794 

Finanaal 

UST.BLLS (CMER) 81 nteBap-eteNIMpci. 

96,10 94X5 Dec 94 9655 9456 9152 9454 17,110 

9585 93J5Mtr95 9(80 9482 9(80 9482 + 083WUB2 

9424 974f Jun 95 9151 9155 9351 9155 +085 5,905 

9157 9130 Sea 95 9121 91X1 9119 93.19 +UM 2S 

EsL sates HA. Frfisdes <72 
Fri'S open M 3112 2 up 153 

5 YR. TREASURY (CBOT1 tncumenn- mLllnKoi iCDad 
104-20100-185 Dec 94 100-23 101-015 100-23 H)l-a» 12} 172851 
lKHB 100-00 Mar 9380-013 100-135 100-04 100-13 + 12 1283B 

100- 00 99-19 Jun 95 99-29 + 12 id 

EiL sates 30800 FfTLitees 6X65 

FrTs open Int 181899 ue 31 

18 YH. TREASURY (CBOD liooxmirti- 0B4 ttxAcriOOoel 

116-21 99-02 Dec 94 99-87 99-29 99-07 99-29 + M 27989 

111-0 90-13 Mar » 98-51 9M4 90-21 99-05 + 2) 51334 

UK-22 97-27 Jun 95 9087 98-n 98-07 98-17 t 22 1B3 

101- 04 97-30 SepfS 17-26 9841 97-26 HNJJ r 20 5 

110-31 98-10 Dec 95 97-12 97-19 97-12 97-19 + 20 1 

Est. sates 77717 Fri^stees 11852 

Fit's Open W 382899 up 2S« 

IS TREASURY BONDS (CBOD 18 PB-smn.mmita l ateasi* uw wjl 
118-08 91-19 Dec 94 96-02 97-08 96-02 9747 +105 390871 

116-20 95-13 Mar 95 95-17 96-19 *5-17 94-19 +105 51830 

115-19 94-27 .Jun 95 9M5 96-00 95-W 9M0 +10S 11,746 

113-15 94-10 Sep 95 95-15 *105 94 

113- 14 »-Z7 DSC 95 95-00 +105 157 

114- 06 93-13 Mn-96 94-10 +105 51 

UB-20 93-04 Jun 96 94-05 +105 28 

93-10 93-05 Sep 9* 93-08 93-25 0MB 93-25 *105 1 

Est stees 3M800 HTs. solas 09893 

| Fri'S Often irtr *54469 0*1 3348 
MiMIVALBONDS (CBOT) uunww pataandtotmapet 


—8X0 94885 
-0X010873 
-0X010853 


+080 MW 
+0X2 1834 
+0.U 340 

361 

+&1B 00 


bU^ 


:s ••• ■Vi- .v rfe-N ^ - :* X- rr * . 

'-V' '■f'"'? •• A - • r.v. f. • s ^ IMMUIHBI 


K w- 1 . ■ ■ ./van -./vw 

mm&m 


8UM T7.MDKM 104X5 18450 177X0 177.15 -AM 0^4 

944X0 71X0 Mar 95 1KJC 18988 182X0 182.15 —7X5 13823 

B2JBMOY 95 W1X0 191 JO 1B5X0 10550 -6X0 5X55 

S5X0JU95 193X0 193X0 18675 18675 -4X0 l.BM 

230X0 105X0 SOP 95 19UB 19100 188X0 1MX0 -AIB 1X3} 

aexo BixoDecvs ioixb wixo mxo ibus -6xo m 

2B5JD WOXO Mar 96 1T1J8 191 JO 191 JP 189X5 -4X0 171 

Eft safes 9854 RTtesaNa ARM 

Fri'S open jw 31M4* OH 113 
SUUItriflORLDlt 04C5E1 uuntL-cxiipab. 


OOTTONJ tNCTN) SMta- Mta lb. 

77 JK 4*9 Dec 94 7100 7418 73X0 TUI +0X1 10,129 

7S.IJ 62-50 Mar 95 7SJS0 7X73 75X0 7A18 +023 20781 

78X5 A4X0 MOV 95 7605 7670 76X5 76J5 +0J7 7M* 

TVS 4930 Jul 95 76X0 77 J0 76X0 77.15 +03S 4W 

74JD <6800095 71X0 +0.10 638 

72X0 66X5 Dec 95 70X0 70X0 69.90 70X0 +0X0 lift 

7065 £8J0Mv96 7075 7075 70X5 70X5 -U.K 30 

Est sales HA Fri'S. sates 8844 - 

Fri'S open mi 55.732 ua 47 

HEATING on. (NMS71 «MMaa*-5HntaMraoi - 

59X0 4680 Dec 94 50-28 S0JS 4080 4BJ0 — I J4 38X46 

62X5 43X5 Jan 95 H!X0 51X5 «J0 -lX4 39Xg 

S8XS <7.95 Fell 95 51 JO 51.55 90X0 351X0 —134 23X52 

57 JO 47X0 Mar K 50X0 5135 4965 *65 —1X9 13348 

55.15 2.05 Aw 95 50X5 S0X5 4930 493B -069 Ufl 

5430 47X0 May 95 49X0 49 XU 6BM 49X0 -4L54 4J1f 

5250 46X9 Jun 95 49.15 <9.15 48.® 48X0 -ftM 

SAMI 47XSJUI1S *30 *930 46AS *8X5 -OM , 

UM 42X0 Aua 95 49.10 49.10 *9.10 «.10 -OX* 1,982 

5760 5270 Dec 95 5210 5210 5210 5210 -4U4 4,7* 

EEL sales 29388 Fri'S. sows AW •» 

Fri'S open W 154,122 up 3230 -8 

LIGHT SWEHTCMfllE (NMBU I AMtaX-mAw, Bdr MX i 

2080 14 93 Dec 94 17.95 11X0 1761 1768 -056 *4,190 

1965 IS. 15 Jon 95 I7J97 11X9 1762 1767 -flJ7 <0,9® 

1960 1538 Feb «S 17X4 18JQ 1764 1764 -032 4130 

W£& IS© MOT 95 1765 17X7 1763 1763 —067 25,981 

1968 1535 AW 95 17J2 17X2 1768 1768 -037 T76H 

19X4 1569 May 9S 1764 17X7 17JB 1760 -032 126» 

2030 1573 JOT 95 1779 17X5 1769 1760 —029 253* 

19X7 16X5 Jul 95 1761 1761 1761 1761 -03011787 

19X7 14,14 Auo 95 17J5 1765 1765 1765 -030 7332 

I860 1760 Sep 95 1768 1761 1768 1769 -030 126*2 

20X0 1660 Dec 95 17X9 17.99 17X3 17X3 -0X4 15303 

Efl. sales 122X45 FtTssObs 118378 
Fri'S open nf 394X43 up 57 ; 

UNLEADED CASOUNE tMMBQ dLOOSac*- am P«r Bfil , 

<080 50X0 Doc 94 5760 58X5 5768 57X0 -012 2SJ4B 

5860 5060 Jon 95 55X0 5440 5520 5530 -044 20.90 

58X5 51.10 Feb 95 5480 K25 5430 5430 -OX1 86$ 

56.95 52X0 Mar 95 5118 55.10 5460 5460 -OX6 4JU 

6030 5661 Apr 95 58X5 58X5 5760 S730 -0X4 UW 

58X0 54X0 May 95 56X0 57XD 54X0 57X0 +015 16$ 

54XS 5240 Dec 95 5220 5120 5U0 53X0 -003 2 0 

E5*. sates 21,144 Flfs. sates 19644 T 

RfsepenW mjm « «J33 


Stock Indexes 


SAPQDMP. MDCX (CMER) MiMh 

487.10 429X0 Dec 94 4085 447X0 44155 447.10 +43007.723 

484.10 44I65Mar«9 467.18 47040 447X0 470X5 +435 24X97 

48760 451X0 Jun 95 471X0 47430 471X0 473X5 +4X5 36» 

487X0 463Ji$Sep9S 47420 478JB 474X0 47035 +<XS 72 

Esi. sales NA Fri'S. Hues 57641 1 

Fri'S open ird 238X84 up 732 1 

NY56 COMP. INDEX (NyPO nmnlaAi 1 

24450 237.15GMCM 85428 255X8 25420 25565 •110 36* 

254X0 2*60 Mar 95 2S5XD 256.15 255X0 2S6XS 0.10 7ft 

215X0 254003*95 257 JO 25760 25760 2582 -HO 1 

245JB 755 50 Sep 95 159X0 25200 259.00 25965 -110 j 

Est. sates NA Fri's. satei 2,151 ‘ 

Fri’sapenM VST Oft 59 1 


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tf Sam ACttassh USD B t 112154 

CURSITOR FUND 
ff Curttar Eost Asian Ea—S 

tf Cursltar GUH Bd Ooaart % 

d CursHor Glbl Gwth Sub-Fd J 
DARIER HENTSCH GROUP 
Tel 41-22 708 68 J7 

if HMiSCh Treasury Fd SF 

tf DH Motor Markets Finns SF 

tf DH Mandarin Part (ana SF 

a Samurai Portfolio SF 

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ADVERTISEMENT Nov. 14 , 1994 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

divlnfeEMbPN«MHniilMi«lBCRWdLniiiSrTgL3»14aaBnan. 

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B tdgnbrtage Cspltnl Carp — $ 129098$ 

m Overtook Pertarmance Fd-5 3032.14 

m Padflc RIM Op Fa s 10S.10E 

EBC FUND MANAGERS (Jersey) LTD 
t-3 Seale St> St Heiier ; 0594-36131 
EBC TRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD. 


d Caaltol- 
tf 


INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
tf Uwa Term- » 

tf Lang Term - DMK - - d m 
ERMITAGE LUX (9535073 30) 
w Ermltose Inter Rate Strut _DM 


w Ermltooe Aslan Hedge Fd J 
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w Ermitage Amer Hdg Fd S 

w Ermltoge Enter Mkts Fd — 5 
EUROPA FUNDS LIMITED 

tf American Equity Fund S 

tf Amer Icon Option Fund— 5 
w Aston Equity Fd—- .-8 
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EVEREST CAPITAL (M0) JH 2200 

m Everest Capital inti Ud S 

FAIRFIELD GREENWICH GROUP 
m Advanced Strategies LM—J 

m Chorus inter national Lid S 

nr FUrlteki inti Ud S 

w FalrtleM Sentry Ltd-v — — 5 

w Foirficid Strategics Ltd S 

m Sentry Selea Ltd % 

FID UTY INTL INV. SERVICES (LUX) 

tf Discovery Fund - S 1M7 

d Far Ear F and f 0)87 

d Rd. Amer. Assets S 19982 

d Frontier Fund 1 3673 

d Global Ind Fund S 1984 

tf Global Selection Fund S 22X9 

tf New Europe Fuad — ■ - -S 1*80 

d Ortenl Fund S 130J7 

If Special Growth Fund ■ 5 *1.16 

d world Fund s 115, 15 

FINMANAGRMENT SA-Un*oBO(4U1 /2M121 
ir Petto Premium Cora. . S 122S80 

FOKUS BARK A8x 472488551 
wSCmtlonds Inrt Growth Fd_S 089 

FOREIGN A COLONIAL EMERG MKTS LTD 
Tel ; London 071 620 1234 
tf Argentinian Invest Co StaovS 2780 

d BradHan Invad Co Slcav —1 43jr 

w Colombian Invest Co 5kavJ 1580 

d Glbl Em Mkts Inv Co SJajv J 1186 

d Indian Inwnt Co Stare $ 1256 

tf Latin Amer Extra Yield Fd$ 95144 

tf Latin America Income Co_* 971 

tf Latin American Invest Co_3 1249 

tf Me xlcon Invest Co Skav I 45.19 

>v Peruvian Invest Co Slcav _$ 14.10 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 

P.O. Bax 2001. Horn! Hon, Barmado 
mFMG Global [31 Odl I 


m FMG H. Amer. (31 Oct) i 

mFMG Europe m OclJ 6 

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m FMG a (31 Oct) S 

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FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 

w Concepts Far ex Fund S 

BAJA CURRENCY FUNDS 

w Gaia Hedge ll 1 

■v Gaia Hedge HI S 

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mGola Guaranteed CL I. 

niGataGuQixxit a eda.il 

GARTMORE 1NDOSUEZ FUNDS 11/11/94 
TH: (35214654 34478 
Fax : (3521 465423 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

tf DEM Band Db587 DM 442 

0 Dlverband DtoZJS SF 3jn 

tf Dollar Band Dta 113 S 241 

d European Bd — DIs 1.13 Ecu 189 

d French Fnxic_Dts 985 FF 1274 

tf Global Bond Dts2ffl S 280 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 
tf ASEAN S 


tf Alla Padflc. 


tf Continental Europe— 
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d I 

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w ScotlHh World Fund S 4718891 

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wGAM East Alia. 

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SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 4T-I-422 2626 
MutaetxxJntrasoe 17XCH BULZurlch 

d GAM (CHI Europe SF 9X79 

tf GAM (CHI Mondial SF 16139 

tf GAM (CH) Pocttlc SF 28578 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 East S7lh Stream Y 10022817-688-000 

w Gam Europe J 90 jr 

wGAM Global I 13787 

w Gam International 5 197.53 

w Gam Japan Canttai — S 95.12 

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GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda :130V) 795*000 Fax: 19091 2956U8 
JWN GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 

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wGSAdl Rate Mart. Fd 11 s 

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w GS Eura Smell Cop Part DM 

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a GT Asia FundB 

tf GT Aslan Small Coma a Sh5 
d GT Asian Small Come B SiiJ 
tf GT Austrafla Fd A Sbares.1 
tf GT Australia Fd B Shoreses 

tf GT Austr. SmcH Co A Sti 1 

0 GT Ausfr. Smab Ce B Sh S 

d GT Berry Japw Fd A sh_s 
tf GT Berry Japan Fd B Sh— S 
tf GT Bond Fd A S hor e% S 

tf GT Ble 8 Ap Sciences A ShJS 
d GT BIO& An Sciences B ShJ 
tf GTDaUorFirtdASh s 

tf GT Emeraiim Mkts A 5h — Jt 

tf GT Emeratog Mkta B Sh S 

tf GT Em Mkt Small Co A Sh J 
tf GT Em Mkt Small Co B 5b J 
wGT EuroSmriiCoFaASh-S 
wGT Eura Small Co Ft) BSh_S 
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tf GT Hong Kong Fd B Shansi 

tf GT Honshu Path U mfer A Shi 
fl GT Honshu Pathtlntfer B 5hl 
W GT J OP OTC Stocks Fd A Shi 
W GT JOP OTC Stacks Fd B SM 
w GT Joe Small CO Fd A 5r_l 
w GT Jao Small Co Fd B Sh—l 

w GT Lotto America A s 

wGT Latin America B. 1 

tf GT strategic BdFd A Sh—l 
tf Gr strategic Bd Fo B Sh—s 
d GT ldiamm. Fd A Shares* 
tf GT Tctocomm. Ftf B Shores*. 
r GT Tecnnataav Fipid A Sh_s 
r Gt Tecwmtaov Fund B sh_s 


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a G.T. Btotsch/Heotth Fund —5 2084 

d O.T. DeutsdPond Fund. 1 T240 

° »J-gy»i»WFBnd 3 4944 

wG.T. Global smart Co Fd 5 3975 

tf G.T. Investment Fund S 27 JM 

wg.T. Korea Fund 1 6J7 

W6.T. Navfty tnd Countr Fd J 6487 

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f GCM InL Eq. M » 107.90 

4,gOMWBSpeciaC_ll^J 9W53 

S-WNT FO mnors (Baser) Ud 
flight glbl stra tegy fo 

2 gff™” Currency S 3981 

tf doom Bo nn e m i 

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d Gilt At Bonn r 1054 

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13X06 

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g'J'ttN^Vu.GHT INTLACCUM FD 

2 M«)*Y DM 90748 

tf. US Dollar Money ____s 39144 

i Boner S 

tf inti Bakxiced Grid j j*52 

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wHoswibkJUer Com AG 1 <3601)0 

"i£25SS2ESS? ,l,K * 12114 

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— flCFT _ i urn nn 

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w Mana i-BireaEOTpn .FF T24S71 

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wMgxflnveM pop lattes ff h«ms 

w MontflmieM Emerg GrawlhJFF 132*57 

w Mon dHretat Futures— FF 111682 

I Harfaauu ot a Cmrf g un 

OtaPtaocnCMOFdntL— J STM 

HERMES A^ETMANAGEMENT LTD 
Bwtitv^: (689) 295 4000, Lux: (352)04 6461 
Final Prices 

m Hermes European Fond Ecu 32694 

m Hermes North Amertam Fds J01J7 

in Hermes Asimi Fond— __s B9J9 

m Hermes Etnerg IWkts FamLS 13556 

m Hermes Strategies Fund__s ossa 

m Hermes Ngutrai Fund— _s 11379 

m Hermes Gtabal Fund s 66172 

m Hermes Bond Fund Ecu 1340.14 

m Hermes Sterling Fd c 10972 

m Hermes Go« Fund S 4mm 

HUTZLER BROKERAGE 
m Pegasus P.P. Portfolio—— 8 1206 

,F f£5A- 6,4 °y P ' Lomtaa5ta(«-71M» 9172 

w I FDC Japan Fuod Y 23B8I80 

w Interband Fond Ecu 10S17J9 

w Korea Dynamic Fund s sssstjfr 

w Malacca Dynamic Fund S 1935.13 

wMnraclnve s tmwit Fund FF 9*13.17 

1NMME PARTNERS (ASIA) LIMITED 
wAskxt Fixed Income Fd— 1 10711 

INTERINVCST (BERMUDA) LTD 

Crt Bonk ot Bermuda, Tel: 809 2JS 4000 
m Hedge Hog 6 Conserve Fd_S 943 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
X Bd RoraL l- 2449 Luxembourg 

w Europe Stxi E Ecu 6874 

INVESCO INTL LTD, POB 27L Jenev 
Tel: 44 SM 73114 

d Maximum income Fund t 

tf Sterling Mngd pm c 

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ff Asto Super Growth. 


d Moot* Htarrant FudCL— — J 

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d Gtd N.W. 1994 S 

tf Gtabal Lflisure- 


PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 

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tf American Enterprise S 

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tf European Enterprise s 

d Globa) Emerging Markets _s 

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tf Sferltag R es erve — * 

a Greater CMna Opps s 

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d international Cautious 5 1512 

d lidemattanal Batanced S 1518 

tf IntentaNOnnl Grawrn S 1520 

ITALFORTUNE INTI- FUNDS 

wCtassA I Aggr. Growth ItaLit 7790550 

w Ckss B (Gktbal Eaultv) S 1X13 

wCtaSSC (Gtabal Bondi I 1075 

waassD (Ecu Band) Eat HUS 

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tf JF ASEAN Trust S 59 JD 

0 JF Fm- East Wmt Tr S 1989 

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tf JF Hang Kong Trust S 1789 

tf JF Japan Sm. Co Tr Y 45496JD 

d JF Japan Trust Y 1077580 


tf JF Malaysia Trust. 

tf JFPadfleinc.Tr. S 

d JF Thailand True) S 

JOHN GOV FIT MANY (LOJAJ LTD 
Tel: 4*524-63 94 2D 
w Gavett Man. Futures —t 

wGoveft Man Fat. USX $ 

w Gavett SGear. Cure $ 

w Gavett s dm Bd.Hdge 1 

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tf Canbar— SF 

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2679 

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tf 5tackl»ar_ 
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d Dollar Band Fund——! 

tf Austin Bond Fund AS 

tf Swiss Band Fund— — SF 
tf DM Band) 


tf Convert Band Find—— 5F 

tf Global Bond Fund DM 

tf Euro Slock Fund Ecu 

d US Stock Fund S 

d Padflc Stodt Fund, 
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d German Stock Fund Dm 

tf Korean Stock Fund S 

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d DM Cosh Fund— — DM 

tf ECU Cosh Fund Ecu 

d Sterling Cosh Fix’d £ 

tf Dollar Cosh Fund 8 

d Frendi Franc Cosh— —FF 
KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 
at Key Asia Ha Mines— — 4 


mKry Gtabal Hedge, 
nutty Hedge Fund inc_ 


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MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS. LTD 
iDTH Corsair Pund Lid —A 7788 

raTTr Duuntten Fd Ltd — S 11180 

meespjerson 

Roun 55. lOlTkk. Amsterdam (2042111801 
wAsta Poc Growth Fd N.V — i 
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w Asian Selection Fd N.V Fl 

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MERRILL LYNCH 

0 Donor Assets Portfolio s 

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MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A S 

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GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
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tf Category* AS 


3*58 

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tf CtassA-1 S 1178 

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0 Class B-l S 1370 

a Class B-2 $ 1X19 


CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

tf Class A-I i 

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tf Clara A s 

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tf ClassA S 

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a Class a s 

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tf Class A I 

tf CtoraB S 

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tf rhr«A % 

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tf Ctam A S 

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EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A S 

tf Clara 8 5 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOLIO 

d CJara A s 

tf CtoraB s 

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tf ClassA s 

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WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

0 Clara A 5 1148 

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ff Clara A 1 1176 

ff Clara B S 1175 

MERRILL LYNCH INC $ PORTFOLIO 

d Clara A S 883 

ff CtoraB— — - - « X33 

ff acme s U3 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

a Mexican Inc S Pitta A i 953 

a Mexican Inc S PHI a B S 943 

ff Mexican Ik PesaPtfl a A4 845 

ff Mexican Ik Pew Ptfl Cl B 5 845 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 

m Momentum RabtoowFd 5 11*42 

m Momentum RxR R.U S 7668 

nr Momentum Stockmaster J 15*78 

MORVAL VONWILLEH ASSET MGT Co 

20540 
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w Wilier South East Asia 
w Wilier Telecom. 


w WHIerfimds-WMerband Cans 
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w Wlllerfimds-Willereq Italy -Ul 

wIVHlertunds-WlHerEq NA J 

MULTIMANAGER K.V. 
m World Band Fund Ecu 


m European Eaulfles_ 
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in Cash Enhancement. 

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-Ecu 


IHCMOLAS4PPLEGATE CAPITAL MGT 
tf NA Strategic OepoiluiUhtasJ 10253 

IV NA Flexible Growth Fd S 14653 

wna Hedge Fund s 13657 


NOMURA INTI- (HONG KONO) LTD 
ff. Nomura Jakarta Fund.-'.. 1 
ODBY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 GrosvenarStXdnWUC9F6A*-71-49*a»98 


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wodev Eureg Growth acc—DM 
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OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTL. INC 
Williams House. Hamilton HMH. Bermuda 
Tel: 809292-1018 Fax: 809 295-2305 


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b III Fund Ud. 


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b Stonehenge Ltd. 


1148 


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d Ashm Dragon Part NV A — S 1085 

rf Aston Dragon Port NV B — S 1083 

tf Global Advisor* 1 1 NV A — i 1X33 

ff Gtabal Advisors 11 nv B— s 1X31 

tf Global Advisors Pori NV AJ 1X45 

tf Gtabal Advisors PsrtNVBJt 1X37 

tf uhntan Cur Adv. A/B 1 788 

d Natural Resources NV A — 1 942 

tf Natural Resources NV B — J 952 

tf Premier Futures Adv A/B-S 9.96 

LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
2*/F Lippa Tower Centra, 89 QwcenswavJtK 
Til (852) 867 6888 Fax (8SZI 5*6 0388 
w Java Fund > 


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w Antenna Fund S 1850 

w LG Aslan Smaller Cos Fd— $ 1*8167 

w LG India Fund Ltd S 1646 

nr LG Japan Fd i 1049 

w LG Korea Fd Pta S 1X97 


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w Indonesian Growth Fd_ 

W Alton Grawtti Fund 

ur Asian Warrant Fund- 


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mMM Sp Res Ltd (BNP) S *4*3 

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mMInt G GL Fin 2003 S 572 

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m AHL Currency Fund S 74) 

m AH L Heal rime Trad Fd s XM 

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mAHL GM Conanndltles Lid J igcg 

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mMAP Guannleed 2000 S 940 

in MAP GW 2001 S 957 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
23 Frail SI Hamilton BernHKto taomt! *J0* 

w M u rttt nie ami Sector I Ltd J mw 
w Marttime GAJ Beta Series J 80745 

w Maritime GBU Delta Series 4 276.91 

MATTHEWS INTERNAT IONAL MGT 
EMERGING A5IAN STRATEGIES FUND 

"fCtos A — ] 1174* 

tf Class B— S 11X77 

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mCtortA— ......... t 9848 

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w Which. Fut. Otvnwta Star— S 

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w Winch. Gl Sec Ik PI (Cl S 

m Winch. Gtabal Healthcare —Ecu 
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w winch. Hide Oly Star Hedges 
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OPFENHEIMER A CO. INC Fds 

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OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front 51, Hamllton.Bermuda 809 295-8*58 


w Oetlma Emerald Fd Ltd. 
w Optima Funa_ 


Mr Optima Futures Find I 

i* Optima Gtabal Fund— 5 

w Optimo Pcrtcula Fd Ltd— S 

w Optima Short Fund S 

m The Platinum Fd Ltd S 

QRBITEX GROUP QF FUND5 

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tf Orbitm Com B Into Tech Fd* 
tf Orblfex GfW Discovery Fd J 

tf OrtXtey Grawtti Fa j 

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FACTUAL 

d E term r> Fund Lid s 

tf inttnltv Fund Ltd S 

tf Hovastar Fund S 

d Star High Yield Fd Ltd s 

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w Luxor — . S 

d Parent USA B s 

rf Porvml Japan B - — v 

tf Poreesf AslaPocW b ( 

d Porvesl EuraaeB. Ecu 

d Parvest Holland B Fl 

d Ponml France B. 


tf Parvest Germany B DM 

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d Porvesl ObU-Eeu B 

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d Parvest S-T Europe B_ 
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d Parvest S*T CHF B 5F 

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/ Emendna Mkta Hides I 

f EuroMIr lEcul Ltd ...Ecu 

f FX. Fbnndals A Futures— S 

t Grawtti N.V S 

f investme n t Hides N.V s 

f Media ACammuidcaHons— 5 

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tf Ptatet vahuirae (CHI SF 

m mil Small Can nOM ) „_S 
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m Premier InH Eq Fund t 126X58 

■m Premier Sovereign Bd Fd_S 71*59 

m Premier Gtabal BdFd s i***56 

m Premier Total Return Fa i W/.15 

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tf Putnam High IncGNMA fa Ul 

tf Putnam Utn Fund $ is_n 

QUANTUM GROUP OP FUNDS 

w Aston Oovetapment S 10*21 

w Emerging Gnmrfft Fa K.V.-S mjg 

w Quantum Fund N.V t 172S54* 

wQuontum industrial — — s ioijd 


or Quantum Rga»y 
w Quantum UK Reatnr Panda 
w Quasar inn Fuad N.V— S 

Rro&VTFUND MANAGEMENT LTD 


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tf Regent Glbl Reserve i 

tf Regent Glbl Resources S 

tf Regent GW TTgre-—- * 

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wReoeni Mestim Ftf Ltd. 
m Regent Padflc HdoFd. 
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w Republic GAM Padflc 5 

iv Rep Gtob Currency 1 

ir Rep Giab Fixed Inc S 

w Republic GnseyDol Inc — I 
iv Republic Gnsev Eur IK — DM 
nr Republic Lot Am Alloc— J 
ir Republic Lot Am Ament — S 
iv Republic Lot Am BrazK — S 

tr RopubUc Lot Am Mextan — S 

iv Republic Lot Am Venez — S 
iv Rep SUamea Strategies — S 
ROBECO GROUP 

POB 971X60 AZRottBTdcm.131 HO 22*1234 

tf RG America Fund — Fl 13580 

a RG Europe Fund Fl 12728 

d RG Padflc Fund Fl 14XW 

tf RG Ofvfrenfe Fund — Fl 5150 

a RG Money Phra F Fl Fl 11555 

Mare Robeco see Amsterdam Stocks 

ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND OE) 

IN-HOUSE FUNDS 
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■v Datum LCF Rothschild BC_S 
wDalwa LCF Rothsch Eg-_4 
nr Force Cosh Tradition CHF JF 
wlMam 


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w Pri Challenge Swiss Fd SF 

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a Prienuity Femefvetla SF 

b Prleawtv Fd-Latln Am s 

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h 50tl l X g * 

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w Eunop Stratag lnvestm W_Ecu 

tr IntegnU Futares- — S 


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SC FUNDAMENTAL VALUE BVI LTD 
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mNAV « 132941 

SKANDIHAViSKA BM5KILDA BANKER 
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d FTarron Ostarn Inc_ 

tf Global Ik 

d Lakamedel Inc 

d Vartden Inc 

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SODIT1C ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 


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m Clara A Distributor j 

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mSR European S 

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SVEHSKA HANDELSBANKEN SA. 

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tf SBC Eoultv Pttl-AustraltaL-AS 

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For investmoi^ 

inforrr»atioh|:< 

Read V:;£ 
the MONEY 

every Satur 
in ffie JHE 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Catherine de VIENNE at (33-1)4$ 3f& 




1 



































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


Page 1$ 


ASIA/PACIFIC 


-i 


'ees 

To Cooperate 





■tr-‘ 


c * 


; By Steven Brull 

. Jmemownaf Herald Tribune 

r -TOKYO — Aiming to stem 
-'the. tide of technological change 

- from across the Pacific, two of 
-Japan’s leading electronics 
' pampames. Sharp Corp. and 
.Fujitsu Ltd., announced an 
: agreement Monday to jointly 
. develop multimedia products 
■ and services. 

Jf the alliance were to flour- 
r ish,. the. two company ^th 
their complementary techno- 
togiral strengths, could make a 
significant- impact on Japan’s 
efforts m the multimedia field, 
which combines data, voice and 

- graphic information. 

But while their long-term 
goals are ambitious, executives 
cautioned that at least for now, 
cooperation would be limited 
£and at aim’s length. 

“preplan to develop new sys- 
tems based on technologies that 
each company has developed 
independently,” Mikio Otsuki, 
Fujitsu's executive vice presi- 
dent, said. “We have no p lans 
to exchange personnel or set up 
a -new company for joint re- 
search and development.” 

Sharp is the world’s leading 
supplier of liquid crystal dis- 
plays used in notebook comput- 
ers and a successful innovator 
of high-technology consumer 


products, such as personal or- 
8“^ Fujitsu, Japan’s big- 
gest computer company, is a 
leader in telecommunications. 

The companies said their ini- 
tial project was to improve the 
telecommunications ability of 
Sharp’s portable infoanation de- 
vice, Zaurus, allowing it to con- 
nect easily with Fujitsu’s on-line 
information service, NIFTY- 

serve, beginning this month. 

The impetus to develop prod- 
ucts and services has been 
heightened by fast-paced 
changes in technology that are 
undermining the traditional 
businesses of Japan’s electron- 
ics industry. 

Competition from chip- 
makers from South Korea and 


anese companies’ d ominan ce m 
the memory-chip market. 

At the same time, U.S. com- 
panies such as Compaq Com- 
puter Corp. and Apple Comput- 
er Inc. nave been making 
inroads into the Japanese per- 
sonal computer mar ket 

Moreover, U.S. software 
companies such as Microsoft 
are increasingly setting a tech- 
nological agenda that has rele- 
gated many Japanese compa- 
nies to the role of suppliers of 
high-tech components. 


After Game Boy, It’s Virtual Boy 

Nintendo to Launch a $199, 32-Bit Stereoscopic Wonder 


By John Markoff 

New York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — 
Seeking to revitalize a slowing 
video-game market, Nintendo 
Co. was due to announce 
Monday a low-priced "virtual 


reality" game system that it 
ild b 


would begin selling in Japan 
and the United States in 

April. 

The system, known as Vir- 
tual Boy, uses a display tech- 
nology pioneered by Reflec- 
tion Technology Inc., a small 
private company in Waltham, 
M assachusetts. To play a Vir- 
tual Boy game, a user must 
look directly into two minia- 
ture displays to view stereo- 
scopic images created by ar- 
rays of red light-emitting, 
diodes, or LEDs. 

The game, which has a 32- 
bit microprocessor and which 
will require specially written 
software, will sell for SI 99. It 
is to be demonstrated in the 
United States for the first time 
at a consumer electronics 
show in January. 

Nintendo also said it bad 
made a minority investment 
in Reflection Technology, 
which has 20 employees, and 
would make the tmy screens 
used for the game under a 
licensing agreement in Japan. 

Nintendo currently sells a 
portable system called Game 
Boy that is designed to run 
versions of the company's 16- 
bit video games. 


“The only similarity be- 
tween this new game and the 
existing Game Boy product 
happens to be the second half 
of its name,” said Peter Main, 
Nintendo of America's vice 
president of marketing. "This 
is a new genre of game-play- 
ing device.” 

Both Nintendo and Sega 
Enterprises Ltd., its Japanese 
competitor, have been search- 
ing for ways to reignite the 
market for their games while 
they await the arrival of more 
powerful 32-bit game systems 
sometime next year. 

Many analysts of the video- 


game industry expect this 
Christmas season to be disap- 
pointing because the two com- 
panies have already sold about 
33 million 16-bit game sys- 
tems, saturating the market. 

Next year, competition is 
expected to be stronger. 3DO 
Corp. and Atari Corp. are al- 
ready selling 32-bit and 64-bit 
games, and Sony Corp. is ex- 
pected to enter the U.S. mar- 
ket with its own game, intro- 
duced recently in Japan. 

"Next year there will be a 
big sorting out,” Mr. Main 
said. 

Sega, attempting to pick up 


momentum in its Christmas 
sales, has recently begun sell- 
ing a system known as the 
32X, which works as an add- 
in with the company’s current 
16-bit games, giving them 
more power and better perfor- 
mance. Sega's next-generation 
system is expected to be avail- 
able in the United States for 
next year’s holiday season. 

Nintendo, meanwhile, is 
developing a generation of 
video games known as Project 


Reality, with Silicon Graphics 
Inc., that 


Say Cheese? Say Digital! 


r 


Ream 

TOKYO — Casio Computer Co. on Monday unveiled a still 
camera with a liquid crystal display that shows' the image being 
recorded and plays back a photograph after it has been taken. 

Casio said it would sell the camera, the first of its type, 
starting in February. It is the same size as a regular compact 
camera and is to cost 65,000 yen ($665). The company said it 
would produce about 3,000 units a month. 

Instead of using conventional film, the camera converts 
pictures into digital form and stores as many as 96 of them on 
a chip. They can then be transferred to a computer or 
videotape. 

Casio said it hoped the camera would be used to lake 
pictures of product samples and real estate that could then be 
incorporated in business presentations. 

The new Casio camera is similar in principle to a liquid- 


also is expected to 
be available during the 1995 
holiday season. 

For this year’s holidays, 
Nintendo and Sega executives 
hope consumers will be at- 
tracted by new programs. 
Nintendo is counting on Don- 
key Kong Country, the latest 
addition to its Donkey Kong 
series, while Sega has added a 
character. Knuckles, to its 
Sonic the Hedgehog lineup. 

"Contrary to most opin- 
ions, the cartridge game mar- 
ket is alive and well and ex- 
ceptionally healthy this 
Christmas," said Lee Lsgur, a 
financial analyst at Jefferies & 
Co. in San Francisco. 

The Virtual Boy’s LED dis- 


play provides only shades of 
bla 



screen to see what the camera is photographing. 


red against a black back- 
ground, but Nintendo officials 
said the game created a feeling 
of depth that was not posable 
with conventional television or 
computer monitors. 


Investor’s Asia 


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Sources: Neuters, AFP 

Inicmirioral HenWTnbune 

Very briefly: 


• China’s economy will r emain robust in the fourth quarter, with 
strong industrial production, sustained investment and rising 
retail sales, an official forecast said. 

• Suzuki Motor Co. of Japan reported a recurring profit of 9.9 1 
billion yen (Si 02 million) for the half-year ended in September, u > 
8.7 percent from a year earlier. 

• China’s securities newspaper conceded it had been mistaken i t 
reporting that authorities would soon discuss allowing local pen- 
sion funds to invest in the domestic stock market; the erroneous 
report last Ttiesday sent the Shanghai A-share index soaring. * 

• Indonesia and Malaysia have set up their first joint venture banlf . 

PT May bank Nosa International. ap. toughi-Ridd er. Ream. Atf 

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Monday’s Closing 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the dosing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trade? elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


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MICROSOFT: Its Chief Sketches a Vision of a Highly Interactive World 


Continued from Page 9 

make computers "empowering, education- 
al and entertaining.” 

Windows 95 will be the first version of 
Windows that is not built on top of Micro- 
soft's previous operating system, DOS. 
The new design will take advantage of 
computer chips built since the mid-1980s. 

Microsoft already controls about 85 per- 
cent of the operating-system market in 

personal computers with its Windows and 
DOS programs. 

In recent weeks. Microsoft has made 
several moves to expand beyond operating 
systems and application programs. 

The company is planning to buy Intuit 
Inc., which makes the popular Quicken 
personal-finance program, and it said last 
week that it and Visa International would 
develop software that would let people 
shop electronically with credit cards. 

The focus on finance complements Mi- 
crosoft’s moves into tdecommunications. 


As computer, telephone and cable televi- 
sion technologies converge, consumers are 
likely to increase the use of electronics to 
manage their finances and investments. 
Microsoft's strategy would place its pro 1 
grams at key points in emerging systems, 
reinforcing its strong position in operating 
systems. 

Microsoft also is trying to link office 
machin es into its systems. An operating 
system called Microsoft at Work lets such 
office machines as printers and fax ma- 
chines communicate with Windows-based 
computers. 

Earlier, Peter H. Lewis of The New York 
Times reported : 

Analysts say that Microsoft’s new infor- 
mation service, which has been known by 
its code name. Marvel, could become a 
leader in the $13 billion on-line services 
industry almost as soon as it goes on line in 
(he middle of next year. 

“It’s going to be a juggernaut by this 


time a year from now,” said Jesse Berst, 
editorial director of the Windows Watcher, 
a newsletter based in Redmond, Washing- 
ton. i 


According to sources who have been 
riefed on the service, the keys to its stra to- 


briefed on 

gy are lowering the initial cost and corrr- 
plexity for consumers to use on-line sen- 
vices, giving businesses a greater financial 
incentive to offer goods and services elec- 
tronically and offering technology superi- 
or to that used by other on-line services. ‘ 


For consumers, the Microsoft Network 
is expected to have a low monthly fee for 
basic services — perhaps as low as S5 a 
month — with extra charges for specific 
uses, such as $L25 a day for daily baseball 
box scores or a similar fee for selected 
slock quotes. The current consumer ser- 
vices typically charge S9.95 a month for 
five hours of connection time, plus S3 or 
more an hour for additional hours. 


CHRYSLER: 

Kerkorian’s Plan 

Continued from Page 9 


agemem and in this program,” 
Mr. Keikorian wrote. 

Chrysler did not comment on 
Mr. Kerkorian's intentions. 

Mr. Kerkorian bought mil- 
lions of Chrysler shares in 1990, 
when the stock was trading as 
low as $9. The stock hit $62.50 
in February, and recently has 
ranged between $45 and $50. 

Chrysler shares on the New 
York Stock Exchange finished 
Monday at $48,875, up $3.00. 

Mr. Kerkorian’s letter criti- 
cized the company for accumu- 
lating large cash reserves with- 
out using some of the money to 
enhance the value of its stock. 


Chrysler said it had $ 7. 3 bil- 
lion of cash 


F, 


cash and marketable se- 
curities at the end of September 
— a cushion (hat company ex- 
ecutives have been budding to 
allow it to weather the next 
downturn in the automotive in- 
dustry. 

Chrysler has posted record 
irofit this year as the market 
or new cars and trucks has 
boomed. 

"We have been committed, 
long-term investors in Chrysler 
and continue to believe that 
Chrysler is an excellent, well- 
managed company and an at- 
tractive long-term investment, 
which is why we intend to ac- 
quire additional shares,” said 
Alex Yemenidjian, a Tradnda 
executive. 

“However, we also believe 
that it is essential that Chrysler 
take action in the interests of all 
shareholders to enhance share- 
holder value, and we are confi- 
dent that the program we have 
proposed will help accomplish 
that objective.” 

(AP, Bloomberg) 



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Firms 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


Page 15 1 ! 


Large Domestic Market Helps in Worldwide Efforts 

ftv MitnLoll \/t . 


By Mitchell Martin 

International Herald Tribune 

; XAS VEGAS — American companies 
arc destined to dominate the worfdKutart 
for computer programs for the foreseeable 

Sf cons J u ? ers in other coumrits 
are Vkety to see falling prices and quicker 

SSSl <J S - soflware - “*“ta 

Addressing an international marketing 
forum that locked off the annual Comdex 
autunm trade exhibition Sunday, esoecu- 
rives^ iro ni s everal companies told US 
software writers they could tackle growing 
°^2 S f? S I ?f rJt * e J 5 , y approaching them 
of locaJ partners. Comdex is 
theworid s largest computer trade show. 

The key American advantage over for- 
eign programmers is a large, well-devel- 
oped home market with one language and 
one -5?™ r ^' w “tch allows progr amm ers to 
benefit from economies of scale unavail- 
able in other countries. 

Just as in the music and motion picture 
markets, about 70 percent of software sold 
in Europe is American in origin, while 30 
percent comes from “local heroes," said 
Pierian Muller of SWM Software Market- 
ing GmbH. 

Europe is the most likely target market 
for many software companies, according 
to Mark Busby, president of BSCA Inc., a 
consulting company. Although sales grew 


at a relatively tame 12 percent rate in the 
first half of this year, according to data 
from the Software Publishers Association, 
he said the size of the market made it 
attractive to U.S. companies. 

In the first half, European software sales 
were $1.25 billion, more than a third the 
size of the S3.09 billion American market. 
Although Asia grew far faster in the peri- 
od, at a 49 percent clip, sales there were 
only $576.5 million. 

A key element in many of the presenta- 
tions at the international marketing forum 
was that companies needed to “localize" 
their programs for different markets. This 
includes not only translating the software 
but also taking account of different con- 
ventions for such things as dates, numbers 
and currencies. 

The costs of localizing programs are 
considerable; just translating instruction 
manuals can cost $100 a page, said Jack 
Plimpton, a marketing specialist who is 
president of Japan Entry, a consulting 
company. But several executives said that 
if the costs were borne as part of develop- 
ing the programs, die price could be as 
little as 10 percent of the bill for localizing 
programs designed solely for the American 
market. 

The foreign versions must appear as 
soon as posable after the American prod- 
ucts. “A lot of the world watches what 


happens in the U.S. or European-language 
market to see what is coming down the 
road," said Ken Fowles, manager of glob- 
alization at Microsoft Corp. 

Mr. Fowles said that Microsoft recently, 
introduced a U.S. upgrade of one of its 
programs, which he would not identify, 
followed several months lateT by a Japa- 
nese version. He said Japanese consumers 
stopped buying the program after the 
American upgrade came out, waiting for 
the local upgraded version. “There is an 
enormous price for delaying." he added. 

Microsoft now writes its programs to be 
shipped simultaneously in English, Ger- 
man and Japanese, and about a dozen 
other languages are ready within 30 days, 
Mr. Fowles said 

While watching the American market 
for new products, computer users also 
keep an eye on U.S. prices, several execu- 
tives said, and they have been refusing to 
pay the significant premiums that bad 
been the norm — software prices have 
been falling in Europe. 

Mr. Muller suggested that American 
programmers link up with co-publishers, 
companies that help add local content for 
their home markets, rather Lhan re-pub- 
lishers, which essentially help translate 
and market U.S.-designed programs. 


INDONESIA: A Trade Showcase 


CoofamA from Page 9 

of APEC, the Asia-Pacific Eco- 
nomic Cooperation forum, en- 
dorse a plan Tuesday for free or 
almost free movement of goods, 
services and capital in the re- 
gion by 2020. 

“I have spoken to President 
Suharto several times during 
the year, and I know how com- 
mitted he is to achieving this, 
goal,” Prime Minister Paul 
Keating of Australia said “Past 
pressure for trade liberalization 
has come from the industrial- 
ized countries. Now. for the 
first time, a developing .country 
has said we should commit our- 
selves to a free- trade outcome.” 

As a result of a deregulation 
program started cautiously by 
the Suharto government in the 
early 1980s, Indonesia’s manu- 
factured exports have grown by 
an average of 20 percent a year 
since 1986. 

“Indonesia actually has no 
other choice, but to support free 
trade,” the Jakarta Post said in 
a recent editorial “Trading in- 
volves two-way traffic. Indone- 

t cannot continue to expand 
exports without opening its 
market as wed” 

In June, the Suharto govern- 
ment risked nationalist ire 
when it announced another de- 
regulation package^ aimed at 
improving the investment cli- 
mate. The measures opened up 
several previously closed sec- 
tors to foreign capital and elim- 
inated barriers to 100 percent 
foreign-owned investment. 


“Foreign capital is no longer 
seen as a demon" in Indonesia, 
said Don B. "Westmore, regional 
director for international public 
affairs at PT AT&T Indonesia, 
a unit of AT&T Corp. “It is 
regarded as a positive contribu- 
tion to development" 

But while many Indonesian 
companies are benefiting from 
the free flow of goods and capi- 
tal, analysts said that compa- 
nies controlled by relatives and 
friends of Mr. Suharto had been 
prominent in recent contract 
signings. 

“We can’t complain too 
much about the first family 
business,” an Indonesian econ- 
omist said. “After all, they 
spearhead the privatization 
program.” 

Several of Mr. Suharto's six i 
children have become increas- | 
ingly active in business in re- 
cent years, obtaining numerous j 
government contracts. As a re- 
sult, they ihave_ faced growing 
criticism for allegedly using po- 
litical influence to buBd up vast 
business empires. 

When AT&T was awarded 
contracts in August valued at 
$110 milli on from state-owned 
PT TelekomunikBsi Indonesia 
/Of cJigjtaJ , switching and trpnsr 
mission equipment, fiber-optic 
cables and telephone operating 
systems, its; local partner was 
FT Otra Tdekomunikasi, a 
company controlled by Sici 
Hardianti Rukmana, Mr. Su- 
harto’s eldest daughter. 


ARGENTINE REPUBLIC 


GOVERNMENT OF THE PROVINCE OF SANTA FE 

MINISTRY OF WORKS, PUBLIC SERVICES AND LODGING, 
PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT OF ROAD SYSTEMS 
PROGRAM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE ROAD SYSTEM 
FOR THE PROVINCE OF SANTA FE 
KUWAIT FUND FOR ARAB ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 
PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL BIDS FOR CONTRACTING 
THE EXECUTION OF WORKS: 


PR0VI NCIAL ROAD N° 91 : BUSTINZA - T0T0RAS 
SECTION: BUSTINZA - NATIONAL ROAD N° Sh 


• OFFICIAL BUDGET: $8,967,400- 

• TERM OF EXECUTION: 18 MONTHS 

• PRICE OF THE BID DOCUMENT: $2,800- 

• OPENING: DECEMBER 13TH, 1994. 

•TIME: 11 :00 A.M. 

PUCE FOR THE RECEPTION AND OPENING 0FTHE TENDERS: 
COMUNA DE BUSTINZA, (Santa Fe Province) 
at the place and time set for said act 


DOCUMENTS AND INFORMATION: 
Pcilacio Municipal - 9th. Floor - Santa Fej 
I Tel.: 54-42-37660 - Fax : 54-42-39672 



EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


INTEBNAflOHUU. 


MAW 


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and Master’s degrees 

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and st the 

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TeL: (4*) 71 836 48 02 
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announcements 

Attention visitors 
from ;Jhe U.S. ! 




fSMG low? — having prefaJean? 

SOS HHP crtasloe in Erufalu 3 pjn.- 
11 pmTel:PtwP|<7ri»». 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

PARIS A SUBURBS 


AVENUE FOCH 

SonAr sde. spferdd 600 sqjn. aid 
450 sqm in freesknw bdUng 
FONOERE TEOCA09O P) 45 53 14 14 


Tk-BUEDELUE 
Chorming pedo-»Te. Pres 


Next Upcoming 
Real Estate 
Advertising Features 

❖ In and Around Paris, Yowwher 18 

For more details, rnntnrt: 

Fred Ronan in Paris 
Tel.; +33 1 16 37 93 91 - Fax; +331 16 37 93 70 


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FRtDDY 

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End of Year 

SPECIAL 

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BUSINESS SERVICES 


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Sow SK «f am ooR^ared 
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h HHOKUHO, VUIAJ^OTAAD, 
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Xd 4122-73415 40. tar 724 12 20 


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TELEX 20277 


MONACO 


MONTE CABO 

New prated with stuchos to 5-roam 
up ort neins avaiabie. P anaBwe v*w, 
ctrahle office space, attracftve ace 
Father detail- Mrs Bodaram ■ SEHi. 

9 ave rf Ostende • MC <'8000 Monaco 
Tet (33| 92 16 90 00 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 

LONDON. Begani 3-bed, 2 bah house 
to let m Chefcea far Oestmqs seraon. 
tlOOO/vA TeL UK 44 0171 351 1511 
Foe- IK 44 B 71 351 3282 
GH05YB40* SOUAia W1. 1 bed- 
room hsniry flat, long W shoo le*. 
E365 per wt Tel 44 |C#1 692 45PI 

HOLLAND 


104 S. US.1, Mefcoarne, a 329 

BUSINESS 

OPPfMTUNniES 


RJNDSAVAILABl£ 

AGAINST 

• iMtore of Oedt 

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• Backed by mwde Investors 

THRU MAJOR MT*L BANKS 

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■■ DaevaSMtz.'rignfl 

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•■••• 615 APARTMENTS Long 
& Shat Term Leases fa 
rtshed houses & flatv W +3[ 70 
6250071. Fa*.- +31 20 63047$. 
KeaersgrecH 33. 1015 CD Amsterdam 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


AGENCE CHAMPS ELYSEES 

meadah « finedied epataerts. 
resdenbd aeas, 3 norths and more. 

Tel: (1) 42 25 32 25 

fax ill 45 A3 37 09 


AT HOME IN PARS 

PARIS PROMO 

aportmertfl to rent Futisned or not 

Tel: (1) 45 63 25 60 


|4tb) MABAiS, 6-room oparenent. 
cNrm. terrace, beans, machnes. 
caking Rent FF20.000 monthly. 
NEUIUV SAH.ONS eqinpced awfex 
FF3J00 rw. CHLB HI 42 88 01 58 


TROCADBtO. fieouaful, etegam & 
lamy- >20 *9^ ta9» bwn S f ><*9® 
(fawn. 2 bedrooms, nee Wchen. 
Flum.Td-nr<7 23 0<84 
16ft, NEAR FOCH, beautiful Siocm 
opatnwre . spacious 'eowmgri. 160 
sqm httimovdy fumshea. FKJCLOO&- 
- da aes-Tet owner 145002066 
lift WAR BAST1UE Ccapk} para 
cfae, sumy. 75 sam loft, hrepluce. cJj 
amennev F7i0a Tdtfl) 39 3<Ot J5 - 
7ft. RUE DU BAC near aver, charm- 
mg 50 sqm 2-toom Art. awes, Jsmny, 
fuedocE. F6.QOO. M 1-46 91 48 45 

PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


Embassy Service 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT JN PARIS 
Tel: (1) 47.20.30.05 

re ST HONOtt - 100 SOAL M«, 
excephonal v«w, mpwcoWe, hvina 
lining, > bedrooms (a study + 1 
bma new equrad 



OR5H0RE COMPANB 

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Telephone or fn far irecoedkrfe lareos 
and 100 page colour Ixodwre 

OOtA ASIA UMITB) 

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Td: +852 5220172 
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Tet + 44 71 493 42 44 
Tet + 44 71 491 0603 



OFFSHORE COMPANES. For free 
brochur# or o Aw Tet louden 
44 81 741 1224 Fn 44 B1 748 6558 


COmRMABIE DRAFTS 
BACKS) BY CASH 

• bud nr Tow Name 

• Confirmed by Mojoi W 1 Beds 
10 PtWC Ava^oMiy of Fnnft 

• Backed far Pn»de mwston 

Si CAPITAL SUPPORT CORP. 

US. (714) 757-1070 Free 757-1270 

FINANCIAL SERVICES 


RJNHNG PROBEMS ? 

Verture CodW - Erjuty loans 
Eeal&toto-BwKS 
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Baftobb puorafcfs to seaito fw*tg 
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Brohr’i Commoson Assured, 
tar (63-2) 810-9284 
Tat (43-2) 8945358 or 810-2570 

FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


RETURN PAD FOR TW FB5T YEAS 
1S8H. hfigh retorm mseded eras 36- 
40 yean. Buy cans (orange) groves 
jdraody rioted), radons rawp 
nert Mnmam iMStmers USS 19JK5 
[5 eere^. be Ha teh msmt Rduday. 
Av. de lo Gore 40, Oil 003 loasom 
Phone & Ft» +41-21-311 33 23. 


capitaie • PAmas 

HcmdtxM qudly apvtmetft 

at sun. Pott and suburbs. 

Td 1-4614 821 1. Fax 1-4772 3096 

17 ft, WAGMM - MAIBH 9 BES. 
Superb and very elegon I 200 s^rft, 
tone bug large Anna 4 bedraomt. . 
2/3 fadhroooB, quiet a bride. Pak- 
4 F14 .0D0 Td ni*7 23 M84 I 


be+oonA bosh, bond nrw equrad 
btchere FF13JKI net Ord mfapwdert 
zoom + bath tarn fkai orobbfe) 
Tel: 1-47 71 63 55 


EMPLOYMENT 

EDUCATIONAL 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

CURRICULUM SKOAUST, to devdap 
load cqpaexy n imtn**orKi raotenab 
devdopnwnt end use of new prmetry 
ideal cumxium n Mtnigia 5paiv 
oh requred. Send C.V. to r«ia 
GubbfOw AED, 1875 ConnecKU Ave- 
nue NW. Wojiengton, DC 20009 ISA 
Affirmative action equal opportmty 
empto y ei M.'f/D/V. 


I TEACHER TRAINING SKOAUST, 
pnrncry school reocher tranng pea- 
bon m Nurogoa Spandi raued. 
Far more a fa nwRion. send Cv. to 
Poub Cubbns, AS), 1875 ComedoR 
Avenue NW, Wadwigson. DC 20009 
USA. Affrmoft* achon equd oppof- 

HEALTH/MEDICAL ; 
SERVICES 

UFE IS 8UT A DREAM: A weekend 
(Nov. 19 , 30 } norma n Human Po 
tHtid n Zurich. Cal Dr. MocKenae 
at 081/54 23 52 or tax* » 01/451 
3P73. 

HERBAL TREATMENT IN H.K. 
Strengthen body agars} cancan Use 
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PLANNING TO RUN A CLASSIFIED AD? 

Place your Ad quickly and easily, con lad your 
nearest IHT office or represenlafwe will your texf. 
You will be informed of the corf immediately, and 
once payment is made your ad wfll appear wilbin 
48 hows. All major Crew Cards Accepted. 

EUROPE NORTH AMERICA 


FRANCE Rtit fans, 

TeL- (1)46379385. 
foe 1 1] 4£ 37 93 70 

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fee (071 12402254 


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lefcr 427 175 
for (2121755^8785 

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HONGKONG? 

Id. (85219222 118B 
Tele. 6117D ftTTHX. 

Fn« (852)9222-1190 
SNSAPORE: 

W- 2236470. 

Ftw- 565J 224 15 66 
le!er. 23749 HI SN 







'5* - I , 


p«* 


T 

th 

late 


Page 16 


NASDAQ 



Monday’s 4 p^nv 

This list compiled by the AP, consists ol the 1 ,000 
most traded securities in terms of dollar value. It is, 
updated twice a year. 



■ 12MOrth 
High Lour Slock 


Dtv ym re l«l HBh LW»UCTlOi*BB 


FICUS' 

l 


p’lssip 
l%sr*5si£. 

51% U%ADF>e« 
— aw 



lA criai m 

57ft Id MmeMrt 
UC 7% Acid 


irazsssz 


z s s 

” 10 PI l» 

• 12 ° f 

Z 28 889 38% 

zZBIR 

A8t 33 » ™ p 
_ _ 5793 32 
_ U 06 79 
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- 33 1539 21% 
17 1M 7% 
_ _ 2404 U 27 H 
_ IS 90S 16*6 
7 5U- I7V1 
_ 27 191 9 

_ 27 M 21ft 
33 197 2B% 
_ IB 5149 23 
_ — 203 

.16 A 16 40 ... 

MMiTj. Adobe*/ 30 A Z7 2374 34*6 
36ft 90*6 Adtran - M 246 

E “IS ’5ft 

3 13 S S! 

.100 .9 I 1540 12. 
J4 S 14 Wlu 1 ®- 

1JMe3 -j: :.ffl t. . 

1.9 11 597 21Vi 
_ 19 423 1214 

3.9 14 422 23ft 
-. 36 675 55 

= ■ fl fife 

“ ‘ 201 “95 

_. 14 779 2iw 

_ 91 3049 4914 

72 U « 471 71 
_ 29 18 Vi 

gUKsflasgr a # ft* 
zSJll 

:% 25J6AGreet 56 U is 6101 77V* 
Z 21 700 18 

z “ '8 if 4 

jue 3 “ ifi 13% 
.- 7 513 16ft 



25% 10 AdpjohS 

37% 2 1 ArfoSv 
38% 19 AdotaSy 
36ftJ0HAdtran 
SI lOMAduHIt. 
7V. 12%AdvTLb 

§ %25%AdvaiUa 

U 24 V] Advonts 

9] 17 AKCmpS 
lswio Asntaoo 
1614 9 Agoum 
KftiaftAlrExP 
63%45ft Afao 
1** 9ftAJanfee 



AO 


_ 22 AJcaifSid 

25% VftAIkMfi 

31 H%Alli«tGp 



M 


40V* 21*6 

3I\6 lift AHROSC 
21*6 lOftAltron 
92 47%AmerOn 
2614 19 ABnVr 
tftAmUkfa 


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24 VS SftAMthcSS 
Taw imams i 

17V] eftAMedE 
22 IZftAmMbSat 

S ft UWAPwrCnv 
llVaAPubltsfi 
23%lSftASavFL 
39V* 24 V] AmSupr 
IS lOftATravel 
26%19WAmf0d 
60ft 3A*Amam 
334* 8% AmfChGP M 
17ft lift And BcP 
19% 10%AnchGm 
53 lfftAncVewS 
21 'A 13V] Andros 

38% 18% Artec 

12% 7% Aoertus 


24 


25V* 1 1 Amam s 
IIP* 3% ApdExtr 


26%13%ApdDgfl 
33 15 Apdlncvs 

54 1*30 ApJdMofl 


_ _ 79 35 

_ 11 1108 17% 
1.1 20 323 221* 
_ 20 3474 sew 
S S 892 9 

_ • 548 14V* 

_ 16 37 18V1 

_ 33 WO 49V* 
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„ _ 255 16V* 
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2 32 1025 IS 
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„ 23 4742 50% 


22 16 AriMTOrs 24 1.1 25 397 22 


75 15 ArtaorHl 


22 13V* Arden 4 

33*4 74V*ArooCp 
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.19 


12% Argosy 
lSWlDWArCBest 


24 16 V* Armor 
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24% 8H Artstt 
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44 24 AspClTl 
31 '*22 AsdCmA 
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341*77% All oriaF 
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371* 111-iAlmel s 
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nfcwsa£ 

39% 17 AvWTdi 


_ 20 2418 19% 
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1.16 4.1 8 149 2S*fe 

_ 57 1035 16% 
24 3 W 718 13% 

J4 3J 19 1178 21% 

M 2.1 18 785 21 

_ 12 031 10 
_ _ 4510 30 
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_. _ 1379 55% 
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2.1 10 1047 15% 
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._ 24 459 18 
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3 24 5348 33 'A 
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32 


34 


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20% 71% +1 
44 49% +2% 

20 ** 20 % — ** 
17% 18% -*% 
16% 14% — V* 
16% 17 +% 

23 23% 9% 
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14% 14% r V* 
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28V* 28V* — % 
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28% 29% <■% 
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23% 25% v 2% 
17 17% — % 

4% 4% —VS. 

7% 7% +% 
31% 33% +1% 

38% 43 +3% 


34 28% BBS. T 1.16 

12 7% BE Aero 

23% 16 6ISYS 

71 40% BMC SH 

30% 14% BMC Wt 5 
25% 15 BWIP AO 

29 IbBainw 
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21V« 10%BatyGm 
37'* 29 V* (von Pone 1J10 
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45%23%BnoCdlc 32 r 
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55%27%Bioaen 

Wt ISXo 

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2.1 449 211 
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„ _ 212 
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33 9 36 

44 _ 42 

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1.6 15 438 

_ 104 2413 
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2.7 18 494 

- 2418643 

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32 11 513 

_ 36 2820 
1J 15 90 

" 17 1876 
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23% 19 BabEvn M 

21% 12V. Boofritwn 
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a 6»J 


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52% 

24 

21% 

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32% 

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29% 

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44% 45 +% 

14% 14%— 1% 
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39% 39% +% 
16% 17 _ 

10% 10% — % 
30% 30% _ 

52 52% — 

23% 23% * V* 
20% 21 _ 
17 17Vn +V U 
37% 33% 61 
IB 18 1 9* 

12% 12% _ 
20% 20% —V* 
29% 29% — % 
26% 26V* — V„ 
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56% 56% — l M 
26% 27% +% 
24% 34% _% 
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13V* 14 +% 

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29 29% —%i 

20% 30% +% 

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AMEX 


Monday's doting 

Tables Include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflec 
date trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


12 Month 
High Low Sack 


Ohr YU PE H»v Htfi mUjatetfOroa 


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38% 23% ALC 
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17 


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165 

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147 

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22 T* 13% 

31*617 

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25 1007 27% 26% ZAft »% 
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36 668 16% 1»* 15% — % 
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S d P xlft 33 4ft 

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32%15%C 

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28% 14 Gi dLiw .12 

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21 21ft 4ft 

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24% 24 24% _ 

23% 23ft 23ft -ft 
16% 15% 16% 

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22, 20% 21% —ft 

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28 191 
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12 27 24 23ft 23ft —ft 
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13 240 25ft 25% 25% —ft 

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48 12 27*6 26% 27% _ 

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14 104 15% 14*6 15ft 4% 
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194 8 d 7% 7% _ 

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28 6% ift 4% —ft 

130 10% 10% 10ft -ft 
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14 7% 7V* TV, —ft 

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170 'Vu '*u —Vu 
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A6 9J _ kl946 7V, 7 7% - ft 

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44*634 PennTr 
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TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


c l ^rc^ 
-'Sit; . 

b asr T» : . 4 


- lie *.v 


•• It 




iii’iVra 

E ?<>■ 


The 1994 Malaysia Summit Meeting 









A Major 
Summit on 
Trade and 
Investment 
Opportunities 
in Malaysia 

November 21-22, 1994 
Shangri-La Hotel, 
Kuala Lumpur 


For the second time in as many years, Prime Minister 
Dr. Mahathir, members of his cabinet and key figures in the 
Malaysian private sector will join leaders of the international 
business community at a Summit Meeting that will aim to define 
the state of the Malaysian economy and highlight opportunities 
for foreign cooperation and investment. 


MALAYSIA 
SUMMIT 
MEETING 
1 9 9 4 


(IHT) and the Institute of Strategic and International Studies 
(ISIS), in association with the American-Malaysian Chamber of 
Commerce (AMCham), will provide present and potential 
investors with a high level forum to discuss and debate the 
myriad of issues that affect foreign investment in Malaysia. 


THE SPEAKERS 

% The Hon. Dato’ Seri Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad 
Prime Minister of Malaysia 

* Dato’ Seri Anwar Ibrahim 
Deputy Prime Minister of Malaysia 

# Dato’ Seri Rafidah Aziz 

Minister of International Trade & Industry’ 

# Dato’ Tajudin bin Ramli 
Chairman & Chief Executive, 

Technology Resources Industries Berhad 

★ Dato’ Francis Yeoh Sock Ping 

Managing Director, YU Corporation Berhad 

* Dato’ Mohamed Nadzmi Salleh 
Managing Director, PROTON 

% Together with other leaders from the Malaysian 
and international business communities 

THE ISSUES 

The future of Malaysia’s economy and role within ASEAN 
$ Opportunities for foreign investment and cooperation 

* The KLSE and growth of Malaysian securities 
industry 

REASONS TO ATTEND 

★ Develop relationships with leaders of Malaysian 
government and business 

% Meet with Malaysian counterparts and pursue new or 
existing business interests in Malaysia 

* Learn where high yield potential for investment and 
cooperation exist in Malaysia 

REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

The fee for the conference is US$ 995.00. Fees are payable 
in advance and will be refunded less a cancellation charge 
for any cancellation received in writing on or before 
November 7, after which time we regret there can be no 
refund. Substitutions, however, may be made at any time. 



REGISTRATION FORM 

To register for the conference, please complete the form 

and send it to: Fiona Irwin 
International Herald Tribune, 

7th Floor, 50 Gloucester Road, Hong Kong 
Tel: (852) 9222 1176 Fax: (852) 9222 1 190 

□ Enclosed is a check for US$ 995.00 made □ Please invoice 
payable to the International Herald Tribune 


Title (DR. MR. MRS. MS.) 


Family Name 


Position 


First Name 


Company- 


Address. 


City Country. 


15 - 17-94 


SUMMIT ORGANIZERS 



INTERNATIONAL 


AMCham 

Anwrican Malaysian Chtmber 
Of Commerce 




> WITH m new Tout WES AND TM WASHINGTON POST 









Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


» i SPORTS 


T — 

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late — 

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In Season Finales, Navratilova Faces the End as Sampras Eyes the Top 


1 <7* 

ro 

J 2 3* 

1 St 


Women’s Star, 38, Is Ready 
To Quit After N.Y.C. Slims 


By Robin Finn 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Manina 
Navratilova has dreamed it, 
dreaded it, dined on it, decoded 
it with astrologers and tarot 
cards; retirement has been 
fraught with peril and possibili- 
ty. And now, with immediacy. 

. The late tennis sage Ted Hill- 
ing once pigeon-holed Navrati- 
lova as a gloriously mortal 
champion whose on-court atti- 
tude “ranged from arrogance to 
panic with nothing in between.” 
' These days she is a legend on 
the cusp of turning more mortal 


•Tor 25 years Fve 
let tennis make all 
my decisions for 
me; it was like a 
convenient 
blanket, and 1 hid 
behind it.’ 


because, as she puts it, she is 
“getting old." 

Her attitude toward retire- 
ment, which will descend as 
soon as Tuesday and no later 
than Sunday at the Virginia 
Slims Championships in New 
York, runs the same gamut of 
emotional extremes Timing saw 
in her tennis. 

*Tm not going to go into 
some deep depression and lose 
my identity; and if 1 do, well 
there's always therapy,” vowed 
Navratilova, 38, who was only 8 
when she decided it was her fate 
to become the world’s best ten- 


become thick as a sequoia trunk 
or thin as a stiletto, ungrippable 
in either case. She’s had to face 
Nancy Kerrigan on skates on a 
tennis court made of ice. 

Navratilova is curious about 
what will happen when the 
cheering stops. Over the past 
year, she has sought out mystics 
for the answer, in a tiny Thai 
restaurant in New York City, 
and, on a w him, at a tiny 
roadside booth in Houston. 

“Nobody else bad told me I 
had to quit, or I absolutely 
should," said Navratilova, “but 
there 1 was, on the side of the 
road in Houston getting my tar- 
ot cards read by someone who 
didn’t know me from Adam, 
and she told me the same thing 
the astrologer did, that I have 
two. lifetimes, and the first one 
is coming to an end.” 

If the occult was in favor of 
retirement, her body parts were 
aching for it, and her mind 
could use a break. 

“There’s an arrogance about 
her still and that’s what’s al- 
lowed her to stay competitive," 
said her coach, Craig Kardon. 
"She really had no business be- 
ing top five in the world at her 
age with the type of game she 



In Frankf urt, Men’s No. 1 
Set for Agassi catd Becker 


The .tssodated Press 

FRANKFURT —Just as Andre Agassi and Boris Becker were 
siting each other up before the ATP Tour finale, Pete Sampras 
reminded them who is still the king of men’s tennis. 


While Sampras struggled to overcome an ankle injury and 
gain his touch, Agassi and Becker were playing some of the best 


Ane Deden/Rcnten 


plays, but by being crafty, she’s 
kept up with girls who can hit 


Boris Becker, preparing to practice Monday in Frankfort, may get a boost from German fans at the ATP season finale. 


She accomplished that and 
far more; she has. as she puts it. 
been fighting off the twilight 
mists of her career longer than 
most athletes have careers. 

When she retires this week, 
she will do so with the distinc- 
tion of being considered the 
greatest women's player ever. 

After a year of mediocre ten- 
nis results that have been all but 
smothered by an array of hon- 
ors , tributes and accolades, she 
will get on with the unfinished 
business of figuring out how not 
to be a mediocre person. 

“I always thought Td have my 
tennis life, and then the rest of 
life,” die said last week during a 
two-day experiment in normalcy 
on Long Island, where she slept 
.until noon, combed the beaches 
in anonymity and got no closer 
to a tennis court than a Ping- 
Pong table. 

'Tennis stunts your personal 
growth,” said Navratilova. "It 
stunts your relationships. For 
25 years I’ve let tennis make all 
my decisions for me; it was like 
a convenient blanket, and i hid 
behind it. Next year I won't 
have it, and I don’t want it.” 

But Navratilova's subcon- 
scious hasn’t quite caught up 
with this view on retirement. 

In her dreams, she says, the 
handle of her tennis racket has 


kepi up with girls who can hit 
the bail twice as hard as she 
does.” 

"But lately I think that same 
arrogance is also telling her 
something else, that maybe it is 
time to quit,” he added. 

Navratilova announced her 
impending retirement a year 
ago. Since then, while other 
players stayed sequestered in 
their hotel rooms, sustained 
themselves with room service 
and synchronized their watches 
to their matches, Navratilova 
set her timetable to friends, 
food and fun. 

In May, after she lost in the 
first round of the French Open, 
she discussed opting for retire- 
ment on the spot and didn’t 
calm down until she'd been dis- 
tracted by a trio of desserts. She 
derided to work off the calories 
by showing up as scheduled for 


hungered to "hit double digits” 
there had somehow become a 
woman who was too exhausted 
to enter one last U.S. Open. 

But since she was also hang- 
ing onto a top five ranking, re- 
tirement had to waiL It had to 
become her carrot, net her cage. 

Two weeks ago she discussed 
it over brunch at an opulent 
glass restaurant perched above 
San Francisco Bay, all the while 


irritably waving off the atten- 
tions of a tourist with an over- 


her favorite Wimbledon tuneup 
in seaside Eastbourne. England. 


in seaside Eastbourne, England. 

Instead of retiring, she then 
went on to Wimbledon’s final, a 


lions of a tourist with an over- 
active camcorder. 

“I won't miss that part of be- 
ing a celebrity,” she said, then 
instantly wondered if she would. 
"Even though 1 haven’t based 
my self-worth on tennis, I won- 
der about the other people. Will 
anybody still listen to me? Will I 
be as important in their eyes? 
Will everybody disappear?” 

Last week she discussed her 
dilemma, with a glass of Po- 


merol in hand, her dog in her 
lap and a wokful of organic 
vegetables nwling on the stove 
while unwinding beside the fire- 
place in a friend’s kitchen. 

*Tm definitely hur tling into a 
question mark," she said, “but I 
feel very much in control — as 
much as anybody can be when 
they’re going into an unknown 
zone. I had a momentary panic 
about this being my last tourna- 
ment; I wondered if people will 
want to open any doors to me 
after this. But if you are indeed 
defined by your acts, then this is 
a piece of cake compared to 
what I did in 1975.” 

What Navratilova did, at 18 
and oblivious to any conse- 
quences, was to defect from 
what was then a Communist 
nation, Czechoslovakia, to the 
United States. She described it 
as a liberating act that she 
would do again even if Czecho- 


slovakia had not been behind 
an Iron Curtain. 

Her one professional regret is 
that she never won a calendar- 
year Grand Slam. She doubts 
anyone else will surpass her 167 
career titles, her 109-match 
doubles streak alongside Pam 
Shriver, her six consecutive 
Grand Slam singles crowns or 
her 74-match singles streak. 

On the personal front, she re- 
grets nothing, particularly not 
her derision to defy the advice of 
doseting her homosexuality for 
the sake of a better public image 
and bigger marketing clout. 

"I was advised to put men in 
the friends’ box at Wimbledon, 
but I couldn't live with myself if 
I put up a front like that," she 
said. “It’s changing now, but Z 
still don’t know why it’s O.K. 
for a singer like Elton John, or a 
politician like Karen Burstein, 
but not for me.” 


Navratilova’s 22 years of ten- 
nis have earned her more than 
$20 million in prize money but 
only a pittance in endorse- 
ments. The latest affront came 
this year when Lotto re-signed 
Boris Becker and released her 
from her contract. 

"George Foreman goes into 
the ring and gets 100 requests 
for endorsements, but nobody’s 
caning me," she said. 

Nobody’s playing tennis like 
her, either, but she has got over 
that, and attributes her lack of 
imitators to slow courts and the 
safety that comes from playing 
“generic t ennis ” 

“Obviously I didn’t change 
the game, because everybody is 
staying on the baseline now,” 
she said. “So what’s my legacy?” 

With one grand tennis ges- 
ture left and an entire lifetime 
ahead, maybe it's still too early 
to answer that. 


regain his touch, Agassiand Becker were playing some of the best 
t enni s of their careers, including victories over Sampras. 

Now, Sampras baa recovered just in time for the ATP Tour 
World Championship, the $3 miTlinn 1 tour-ending event that 
features the top eight players in the world and begmsTuesday. He 
won the 1991 title. 

By beating Magnus Larsson on Sunday in the European Com- 
munity Championship final in Antwerp, Belgium, Sampras wot. a 
record ninth title of The year and affirmed bis No. 1 ranking. 

“It gives me some confidence going into Frankfurt,” said 
Sampras, who did not drop a set in the tournament. While 
Sampras played in Antwerp, Agassi and Becker were idle. 

Sampras dominated the first half of the season, culminating it 
with his second Wimbledon title. Slowed by injuries, he then made 
an early exit at the U.S. Open and had not won another title until 
Sunday. With Sampras hurting, Agassi and Becker became the 
hottest players on the tour. ... 

Agassi has risen to No. 2, his highest career ranking,, winning^’, 
the UJS. Open and 19 of his last 20 matches. He beat Sampras en*- 
route to winning the indoor Paris Open two weeks ago, ms fifth 
title of the year. 

T couldn’t feel better right now,” Agassi said. “I think my 
performance has beat every bit, if not more, than what I have 
been hoping for at this stage.’ 

"I have high expectations for Frankfurt,” he added "When 
you’ve won as much as I have recently, you tend to feel tike Fve' 
got to get out there and play and keep it going and keep the 
confidence where it is.” 

Winner of the inaugural 1990 ATP Tour World Championship, 
Agassi also credits his new coach. Brad Gilbert. 

“I came into this year veiy focused and determined to make the 
most of what I can do and it started with choosing a coach that 
could get me there,” Agassi said 

Becker also has been praising his new coach — who happens to 


be Agassi's former coach, Nick BoQettierL 
“Finding Nick was a stroke of luck,” said 


“Finding Nick was a stroke of luck,” said Becker, who climbed 
to No. 3 in the rankings after dropping oat of the top 10. In the 
latest rankings Monday, Becker is down to No. S. 

Becker became a father in January and says family life has 
allowed him to find a new spark in his game. 

“I am having a lot of fun again playing tennis,” said the three- 
time Wimbledon champion, who has won four titles this year. 

In the final week of October, Becker beat Sampras, Michael 
Stich and Goran Ivanisevic, who were then the three top-ranked 
players in the world, to win the Stockholm Open. . 

"My goals for this year have been fully achieved, the world 
championship is the crowning and I am excited, especially because I 
failed to qualify last year,” said Becker, who wot the 1992 event. 

Considered probably the best indoor player, with 25 titles, and 
cheered on by the partisan German crowd, Becker will be a 
formidable foe in Frankfurt 

But he faces a tougher draw than Agassi in the round-robin 
portion of the event, with Sampras, Ivanisevic and Stefan Ed berg 
in his group. 

Agassi faces Michael Chang, Sergj Bruguera and Alberto Bera-l: 
sategui, all of whom are threats on day but have little chance on 
the fast indoor surface. 


journey that was part sentimen- 
tal part inevitable. 


tal part inevitable. 

Navratilova skipped the next 
two months of the circuit. Plans 
for ber retirement ranch outside 
Aspen, Colorado, went into full 
gear, but other plans, from 
learning to snowboard to follow- 
ing her friend Chris Evert into 
the TV booth, were put on hold. 

By the end of the summer, she 
had made her peace with closing 
out a career that has spilled over 
into three decades and spawned 
dozens of records. 

Until this year, the sixth- 
ranked Navratilova had man- 
aged to maintain a top five rank- 
ing and win at least two titles 
annually since 1975. The woman 
who won nine Wimbledons and 


Couple arid Love Win a 3d Straight Golf World Cup f dr U.S. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 


DORADO BEACa Puerto Rico 
— The U.S. team of Fred Couples 
and Davis Love set a tournament 
record by winning the World Cup of 
Golf for the third straight time. 

Their victory Sunday broke a mark 
set twice over a five-year period by 
Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer, 
winners for the United States in 
1963-64 and 1966-67. 


The 14-stroke winning margin 
equaled a record set by Ben Hogan 
and Sam Snead 'in 1 956 and the four- 
round total of 40- under-par at the 


Hyatt Dorado Beach East Course 
also set a tournament record. 

“Having our names up there with 
Nicklaus and Palmer is something 
special” Couples said, after shooting 
a 69, his fourth sub-70 round. “They 
meant a lot to the game." 

Couples's 72-hole score of 265. 23- 
under-par. earned him his first 
World Cup individual title. He fin- 
ished second to Bernhard Langer last 
year and third to Brett Ogle in 1992. 

“I fdt we were the best team,” he 
said. "Getting off to such a great start 
look a lot of the pressure off. We 
didn't play as well over the last two 


rounds, but we did what we needed to 
do, turn in rounds in the 60s.” 

Love had to break 70 Sunday, sal- 
vaging a 69 by sinking a birdie putt 
on the par-4 18th hole. His four- 
round total of 27 1 was good for third, 
place in the individual competition. 

Constantino Rocca of Italy shot 68 
Sunday to finish second at 270. Zim- 
babwe’s Mark McNulty was fourth 
at 272. 

“One of these times I’d like to win 
the individual title and let Freddy 
have some time off,” said Love, who 
has finished behind Couples in each 
of the Americans’ three victories. 


McNulty and Tony Johnstone, 
who began the day nine strokes be- 
hind the Americans, didn’t mount a 
run Sunday, playing themselves out 
of contention by the turn. . 

Couples and Love coasted from 
there. 

Zimbabwe could pick up only one 
stroke from par Sunday to finish the 
tournament at 26- under-par, one 
stroke ahead of Sweden for second 
place. New Zealand was fourth at 23- 
under. 

Couples and Love indicated that 
they would be back to try for a fourth 
title next year in China. 


. "I think well go for No. 4,” Cou- 
ples said. “Fve enjoyed playing in 
this tournament and we’ve done well 
together.” 

Although American players this 
year were shut out of the four men’s 
major championships for the first 
time, U.S. national teams continued 
to dominate. 

In addition to the World Cup, the 
United States won this year’s inaugu- 
ral Presidents Cup against a team 
from the rest of the world and was 
runner-up to Canada at the D nnhill 
Cup. 

(AP. Reuters) 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 




49ers Rattle the Cowboys’ Pedestal, 21-14 


Jafcn CJ. Mebangjo/Agcocc Framc-Picsc 

bt the Cowboys' Alvin Harper, cornerbadt Deion Sanders came up wHfapneof 
Francisco interceptions of Troy Aikman passes in die 49ers* victory. 


By Leonard Shapiro 

Washington Post Service 

SAN FRANCISCO— The San Fran- 
cisco 49ers sent a message that came out 
loud and clear and was beamed coast to 
coast: The Dallas Cowboys may be a 
two-time defending Super Bowl champi- 
on, but they are not invincible. 

. With quarterback Sieve Young mak- 
ing like a running back and safety Mer- 
ton Hanks doing his best impression of a 

NFL ROUNDUP 

sure-handed receiver, the 49ers ended a 
three-game losing streak to the Cowboys 
with a 21-14 victory at Candlestick Park 
cm Sunday that left both teams with 8-2 
records and heavy favorites to meet 
again in the National Football Confer- 
ence championship game in January. 

“We punched back finally,” said 
Young, who rushed for 60 yards on eight 
carries and scored a touchdown. “We’ve 
taken a couple of pretty good punches 
the last couple of years. These land of 
games are a true test of character. 
They're not very pretty, but if you win, 
you don’t really care how it looked.” 

The 49ers also know the Cowboys 
were not at full strength this cool, sun- 
drenched afternoon. Their quarterback, 
Troy Aikman, rapped his right thumb 
on a teammate’s hand in practice Friday 
and suffered a deep bruise on the bone. 

Aikman had three of bis passes inter- 
cepted, two by Hanks when the Cow- 
boys were in prime scoring position. 
Arid while Aikman didn't want to use 
the injury as an excuse, he also said: 
“There were different throws in the 
game I was not as accurate with. It 
would be wrong to say it had a major 
impact. There were different times I had 
a problem getting a grip on the balL” 

That was not a problem for Hanks, 
whose first interception came with Dal- 
las at the 49ers 16, and whose second 


came with D allas at the 49ers 7 and 
driving to a potential tying score with 
6:10 remaining. 

_ The 49ers were leading 14-7 at the 
time on Young's 57-yard touchdown 
pass to wide receiver Jerry Rice with 
2:40 remaining in the third quarter. Af- 
ter that last turnover from Hanks, 
Young drove his team 37 yards in 11 
plays for a 13-yard touchdown pass to 
tight end Brent Jones. That made the 
score 21-7 with 2:32 remaining. 

The Cowboys got back to within a 
touchdown when running back Rmmitt 
Smith scored on a two-yard run with 
1:20 to play. But when wide receiver Ed 
McCaffrey recovered the ensuing onside 
kick, the 49ers ran out the clock. 

ADeman’s second pass of the day re- 
sulted in the game’s first controversy. 
Aiming for tight end Jay Novacek, his 
throw bounced off the tight end’s fingers 
and looked to have been intercepted by 
Hanks at midfield. 

Officials ruled the pass incomplete, 
but replays showed the ball never mt the 
ground. Dallas punted two plays later. 

The 49ers had an interception late in 
the first quarter when Ailrman aimed at 
wide receiver Alvin Harper on the right 
sideline. Harper slipped, and comer- 
back Deion Sanders stepped up and 
caught the ball. Sanders had an open 
field, but Harper managed to trip him 
and the 49ers had the ball at the 50. 

■ In other games. The Associated 
Press reported: 

Raiders 20, Rams 17: In Anaheim, 
California, Jeff Hostetler, removed in 
the fourth quarter with a sprained big 
left toe, threw first-half TD passes of 27 
yards to Andrew Glover and 10 yards to 
Rocket Ismail. Jeff Jaeger added fourth- 


the Raiders (5-5). 

The Rams (4-6) also lost their quarter- 
back when Chris Chandler left in the 
second quarter with a sprained ankle. 
Broncos 17, Seahawfcs 10: Leonard 


Russell ran for 109 yards and an 11-yard 
TD with 5:43 left as Denver (4-6) 
stopped visiting Seattle (3-7). Russell’s 
winning run capped an 80-yard, nine- 
play drive led by John El way, who com- 
pleted all five of his passes on the march 
and finished 17 for 32 for 146 yards. 

Packerc 17, Jets Uk Brett Favre threw 
TD passes of 13 yards to Sterling Sharpe 
and 17 yards to Anthony Morgan as the 
Packers (6-4) overcame New York (5-5) 
in Green Bay, Wisconsin, for their third 
straight victory. 

Lions 14, Buccaneers 9: A 69-yard run 
by Barry Sanders and an ensuing penal- 
ty set up a third-quarter Dave KiiegTD 
pass to Herman Moore that secured De- 
troit's victory over visiting Tampa Bay. 

The victory kept the Lions (5-5) in the 
playoff picture. It was the fifth straight 
loss for the Bucs (2-8). 

In earlier games, reported Monday in 
some editions of the Herald Tribune: 

Patriots 26, Viking 20: Drew Bledsoe 
set NFL records for completions and 
attempts in leading New England (4-6) 
back from a 20-point deficit to victory in 
overtime over visiting Minnesota (7-3). 

Bledsoe set league marks of 45 comple- 
tions and 70 attempts in throwing for 426 
yards and three touchdowns. He broke 
the record of 68 pass attempts (Houston’s 
George Blanda, 1964) and 42 comple- 
tions (the Jets’ Richard Todd, 1980). 

Bengab 34, OBers 31: In Cincinnati, 
Jeff Blake was blessed again in leading 
the Bengals (2-8) to their second straight 
victory and leaving Houston ( 1-9) as the 
NFL’s worst team. 

A hobbling Blake (23 of 33 for 354 

ingolr the X-ray table witlfs^sprained 
ankle and hitting a 50-yard pass to set up 
Doug Pelfreys last-play, 40-yard field 
goal for the victory. 

Chargers 14, Chiefs 13: In Kansas 
City, San Diego (8-2) bounced back 
from a 13-0 defiat late in the third 
quarter when Stan Humphries (21 of 36 


for 206 yards) threw TD passes of 52* 
yards to Sean Jefferson, and 5 yams to^ 
Duane Young with 6:41 left in the game. 

Joe Montana (20 of 46 for 178 yards)' 
was intercepted by Darren Camngtoa^ 
who took the ball to the Chiefs’ 8 to set 
up the winning points. The Chiefs (6-4) 
fell two games behind the Chargers m 
the AFC West. 

Saints 33, Falcons 32: Morten Ander-, 
sen his sixth game-winning field, 

goal agains t Atlanta (5-5), this one from" 
39 yards with eight seconds left, to lift* 1 
New Orleans (4-6) at home. ? 

Cardinals 10, Gouts 9: A quarterback/ 
change from Dave Brown to Kent Gra- 
ham couldn’t help New York (3-7) avoid., 
its seventh straight loss. 

Steve Beuerlem found Bryan Reeyes; 
on a 9-yard TD pass with 1:39 remain- 
ing to rally Arizona (4-6). The CardT: 
nals, with their first victory at Giants 
Stadium since 1983, were down 9-0 at. 
the half. But Greg Davis kicked a 45-' 
yard field goal in the third quarter and ' 
the Cardinals held New York to 56 
yards in die second half. 

Browns 26, Eagles 7: Cleveland’s de- 
fense shut down Randall Cunningham, 
Matt Stover kicked four fiel d go als and 
Mark Rypten added a 3-yard TO pass to 
Mark Carrier as the Browns (8-2) won 
for the seventh time in eight games. 

The Browns held the Eagles (7-3) to 
288 yards as the AFC Central leaders 
ended Philadelphia’s seven-game home 
winning streak. 

Bears 17, DoJjptms 14: Kevin Butler* 
kicked a 40-yard field goal with 59 sec- 
onds left and Pete Stoyanovich missed a 
45-yarder with two seconds left as the-' 
Bears (6-4) hung on to stop the Dolphins^ 
(7-3) in Miami ~ 

Chicago got one of the NFL’s more; 
bizarre TDs, off a fake-field goal when- 
receiver Curtis Conwa/s deflected pass*! 
ended up in Keith Jennings's hands and- 
produced a 23-yard score. 


Goalkeeper Charged 
By FA in Bribe Case 


ter FI; 


:Rtf 

„l)k .’» V 


Compiled by Ow Staff from Dispatches 

LONDON — The English 
Football Association on Mon- 
day charged the former Liver- 
pool goalkeeper Bruce Grobbe- 
laarwith accepting bribes to fix 
wccer matches. 

The FA chief executive, Gra- 
ham Kefiy, said Grobbdaar 
would not be banned and could 
continue playing pending a 
hearing into the aflegations. 

The Zimbabwean goalkeeper 
has 14 days to answer' to the 

charges. 

**I think it would be very ex- 
treme if we were to suspend a 
player before hehad a chance to 
explain himself,” KeBy said. - 
“We cannot preempt ible case, 
we cannot prejudge him.” 

In Harare, Grobbdaar said 
Monday that he was happy that 

he could cany on playing while 
he fought the charges. 

“1 am very pleased that 1 
have not been suspended but 
I'm very disappointed that the 
charges have been made a ga i n st 
me,”he said. 

The goalkeeper, whohas con- 
sistently denied the allegations, 
said Ms lawyers in Liverpool 
would produce his side of the 
stray “at the proper time.” 

Kelly said a disciplinary 
commission of the FA would be 
set up to hear the charges 
against the goalkeeper, who 
now plays for Southampton. 

“We view the charges as wry 

serious indeed,” Kelly said. He 

has time to consider the charges 

and consult with his advisers 
and come back to us.” 

"These is every hope that it 


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wiQ be just an isolated case,” he 
added. 

KeflysaM the FA was charging 
Grobbdaar with two offenses: 
“conduct which is improper or 
wfcach is HaMe to bring the game 
into disrepute,” and acceptance 
of coosidcndoii with a view to 
mfhienring the result of a match.” 

KeQy mid he was informing 
FIFA soccer's world governing 
body, of th e action but did not 
expect FIFA to intervene. 

Grobbdaar, who helped Zim- 
babwe to a a 2-1 victory over 

Zaire man African Nations Cup 

match in Harare Sunday, is cx- 


He is dne to play for Southamp- 
ton against Arsenal an Saturday. 

The Britis h tabloid The Sun 
alleged last week that the goal- 
keeper had taken a £40,000 
(564,000) bribe from a betting 
syndicate in return for letting in 
three goals in Liverpool's 3-0 
loss to Newcastle Last season. 

The tabloid said the al le g atio ns 
were supported by secret video- 
tapes ana recordings, which it 
turned ever to the FA for investi- 
gation. British pofice also sod 
they would investigate the claim. 

Grobbdaar has said repeat- 
edly that the Sun’s claims are 
false, and he is suing the tabloid 
for defamation. 

But he pledged last week to 
coo pe rate fully with the FA 
probe into the allegations. 

The goalkeeper, 37, spent 13 
seasons with Liverpool and 
helped the team win six league 
[j p nnpj fwidrip g, three FA Cups 
and European soccer’s top tro- 
phy, the Champions’ Cup, in 
1984. (AP, Reuters) 




Oilers Said to Fire Coach and Aide 

HOUSTON (AP) — The Houston Oilers, whose 1-9 record is 
the worst in the National Football League, on Monday fired their 
coach. Jack Pardee, and assistant coach. Kevin Gilbride. a Hous- 
ton radio station reported. 

KTRH, the station for the Oilers radio broadcasts, said Pardee 
would be replaced by Jeff Fisher, the team’s defensive coordina- 
tor. Pardee and Gilbride, who was in charge of the offense, had 
been under fire since the start of the season. 

Pardee was in the final year of a five-year contract. In the 
previous four seasons, the Oilers made the playoffs but failed to 
get past the first round Last year, the team started 1-4 but won 1 1 
straight to finish 12-4 and win the AFC Central Division title. 

Japan Starts 2p02 = World Cup Bid 

TOKYO (AFP) — The Football Association of Japan said 
Monday that it hadL officially notified FIFA, soccer’s world 
governing body, of its candidacy to stage the W orld Cup in 2002. 

FTFA’s president, JoSo Havdange, has said the World Cup wfll 
be played m Asia in 2002. South Korea has also announced a bid 
to organize the tournament. 

For die Record 

Dafian, a dub in northeast China, become the country’s first 
professional soccer league champion, winning 14 of 22 matches, 
the Xinhua news agency reported Monday. (Reuters) 




NFL Standings 

AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 


Miami 

BufWa 
N-Y. Jots 
IndtanvoBs 
Mm Enolond 


Pittsburgh 

Cincinnati 

Houston 


SanDtsga 
Kansas CHy 
LA Raiders 


1H L T Pet- PFPA 

7 3 0 J00 339 U7 

5 4 8 JS4 19S 175 

5 S 8 .500 173 184 

4 » 9 ABO ZU233 

4 4 D .400 2W 239 

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Ml L T W. PFPA 

■ a o mo 2i9 ns 

6 3 0 SO 153144 

2 ■ B 300 173 251 

1 9 0 .W0 14731* 

W L T Pet PF PA 

8 2 8 JBO 30 1*4 

6 4 0 MO T9S 193 

5 5 D -S0Q 203222 

'4 4 0 400 230343 

3 7 0 JM 195W4 


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Philadelphia 
Arizona 
N.Y. Giants 

Washington 


Minnesota 
Chicago 
Green Bov 
Detroit 
TamsaBar 


CROSSWORD 


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32 Swing around 

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39 Street show 
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song 

41 Artist's soup 


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2 Active one 

3 English 
composer's 

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4 Uhwrinfcled 

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a Bossy’s caD 
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a Sherry - 
classification 
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54 PtaywdgM's 

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90 CHd record 
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19 serve (gas 

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15 Russian kings 
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20 Ear-related 
27Ceppand 

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32 Mexican's nap 
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of the day? 

38 Stow 



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47“— — all In this 
together" 


37 Balaam's mount aa Press clothes 

so Black mark 49 Cylindrical 


42 Lomond and 
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43 Mistakes 

44 ‘Dick Van Dyke 
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W L T pet PF PA 

7 3 0 JQ0 224 164 

4 4 | M0 172182 

6 4 D M0 205143 

5 5 0 J00 W9 217 


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LA Roms 4 6 8 400 179 W7 

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Arizona TO, N.Y. Giant* * 

New OrtcoB 3X Atlanta 22 
Oilman Tt, Miami U 
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Ondarall 34. Houston 31 


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Compiled by Our Saif Fran Dispaicha 

ADELAIDE, Australia — Michael 
Schumacher was making no apologies 
Monday for becoming the first German 
world Formula One champion after he and 
his chief rival, Damon Hill of Britain, were 
forced out of the Australian Grand Prix by 
a crash. 

Hill, trailing Schumacher by a point 
going into the Adelaide street race Sunday, 
needed to beat the German to win the 
crown. But his hopes vanished when his 
Williams-Renault suffered damage to a 
suspension arm in the crash that also 
knocked Schumacher out of the racec 

“It would have certainly been more 
sweet to win a world championship other 
than like this, but if you take the whole 
season then I think it’s fair to say that 2 
deserve the championship," Schumacher 
said. 

Schumacher won the season’s first four 
races and led the field by 33 points after 
the Canadian Prix, the fifth of the year, in 
June. Overall, he won eight of the season’s 
16 races, despite a two-race suspension. 

Bui Britain’s tabloid newspapers were 


united on Monday in questioning Schu- 
macher’s title victory. 

“S mash and grab,” was the Daily Mail’s 
headline. “Schunted out!” raged the Daily 
Express. 

A Sun editorial commented: “Damon 
Hfil should be world champion today. He 
was robbed of the title not by lack of skill 
or courage, but by Michael Schumacher’s 
dirty driving.” 

In The Mirror, a caption under a photo 
of the collision said, “This is the moment 
when Michael Schumacher was branded a 
cheat.” 

Schumacher and his Benetton team 
chief, JFlavio Briatore, said the crash was 
accidental, caused because his car was un- 
drrveable. It had been crippled by the 
German’s heavy impact with the trackside 
wall moments earlier. 

Said Hill. “People all over the world wlQ 
be debating for a long time what really 


Nigel Mansell of Britain, Hill’s Wil- 
liams-Renault teammate, won the race 
Sunday but said his next challenge was to 
find a contract for next season. 


“We might go fishing, we ought go mo- 
tor racing, really it’s in the Hands of the ^ 
powers that be,” he said. 

Mansell, 41, is negotiating with Wfl- ‘ 
liams-Renault about partnering Hill next 
season. Williams-Renault already has Hill . 
under contract and also could use David ] 
Coulthardt, who raced for the team after , 
the death of Ayrton Senna in the San • 
Marino Grand Prix. ( 

Mansell, who raced four times for Wil- > 
Ijamg t h » s season, said he expected a deci- . 
son within two to three weeks. Several , 
other teams also are reported to be inter - 1 
ested in signing him. 

“Everyone will just have to be a little bit 
more patient,” said Mansell, the 1992 For- • 
mula One champion and 1993 IndyCar ' 
Series champion. “I think you’ll find that it 
will all be sorted out in the near! couple of 
weeks.” 

Mansell spent 1993 and most of 1994 
driving in IndyCar races. His victory in . 
Adelaide was his first there in seven at- 
tempts. 

(AFP. Reuters, AP)\ 


Mem England 2A Minnesota 28. OT 
San Dteao u, Karan env 13 
San Francisco 21. Dallas 14 
LA. Raider* 20. la. Ram* 17 
GrWfi Bov 17. N.Y. Jets 10 
D*nvw 17. Seattle ID 
Dotroii 14 Tampa Bay 9 

The AP Top 25 

TM Top T m bIt Flva team* m Tttc t 


Nov. XL total points bant an 2S point* tor a 
lira-place vole tferoogti ana point tor a 29tn- 
DhKX vote, bmf rertfcg to too pravfNt nod: 



Recant 

Pts 

Pe 

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1HM 

ISO 

1 

Z Pont St. (23) 

WM 

WD9 

2 

3. Ftortda 

8-1-0 

1351 

4 

4. Alabama 

TWM) 

1332 

6 

5L Miami 

8-1-0 

13M 

S 

4. Auburn 

9-0-1 

1340 

3 

7. Colorado 

9-1-0 

1X0 

7 

X Florida St. 

Or HI 

1,174 

• 

9. Texas A&M 

9-0-1 

13M 

* 

WL Cotorodo St 

9-1-0 

92/ 

10 

1L Kanos St 

7-3-6 

m 

11 

13. Oregon 

S-3-0 

856 

15 

U. Southern Cal 

7-1-0 

■21 

17 

14. VlrgMa Tech 

8-24 

741 

14 

l5.Mltfdoai 

7-34 

486 

19 

16. Vlndrda 

7-2-0 

528 

21 

17. Boston College 

6-2-1 

47/ 

2$ 

n. Washington 

744 

434 

23 

19. Arizona 

744 

334 

13 

30. Brtahant Young 

9-34 

303 

23 

2L Utah 

8-24 

SB 

IS 

21 Qhto St. 

844 

238 

— 

23. MbrisdPPl St. 

7-34 

230 

20 

24. Duke 

•44 

284 

18 

25. N. Carol tea St. 

7-34 

174 

— 


CFL Playoffs 

DIVISION SEMIFINALS 
Eaten Mvhtoa 
Whmlpao 24 Ottmn 16 

WaMra DMstoa 

Catgarv 34 Saskatchewan 3 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Altonttc Mvttloa 

W L Pel 
W a sh in gt on 4 1 JOB 

New York 3 1 

Orlando 3 2 MB 

Boston T 3 -2S8 

Nsw Jersey 1 S .147 

phnadatpMa 1 S .147 

Miami 0 4 AH 

Central Dhrtotoo 

Detroit 3 2 M0 

Indiana 3 2 M0 

CMcaso 3 3 M0 

Cleveland 2 2 JOB 

Milwaukee 2 2 J* 

CharloHr 2 3 ABO 

Atlanta 1 5 .147 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

w L Pel 
Houston 4 O IMO 

D en ar 4 I MO 

Dana 3 1 J3B 

San Antonio 3 1 -750 

Utah 2 4 233 

Minnesota 8 4 AM 


Phoenix 3 2 MB 2 

[_A. Lakers 2 4 J33 3V> 

LA. Clippers OS HO 5 

SUNDAY’S RESULT 

LA. capper* son 2»— n 

Seattle 29 29 2* 33-415 

LA.: Dehere 7-158-11 S4,VaupM 11-12 1-2 23; 
S: Askew M3 54 20. Schrempf 5-8 8-TD 14 
Rebounds — Los Anodes 53 [Vaooht 9), Seat- 
tle 58 I Kemp 11). Assists— L bs Anoetes 17 
(Spencer. Rtdtaardaon S>, Seattle 22 (McMil- 
lan 41. 


SENIOR CHAMPIONSHIP 
Root scares end eonrinws SanOov el the 
SUS mutton 1 en t er Tow ChamptanKrtP, 
pSaved oa die MlS-vard. parTX Duets C*tf 
nod Beach Ctoh cotnc (» won won Rffli bole 

x-Ray Floyd. SMUN0 47-7347^4-273 
JM ABHB. SWUM 44-71 -44-72— 273 

Jav Stool, Sll&OOO 49-72-7143 — 27S 

Jim Deni. 994000 71-49-7047-277 

Torn Warm, 577,000 67-74-7D48-279 

Dave Stockton, 144.180 49-73-7M7-280 

Tommy Aaron, 157,700 73-724947—281 

jerrv McGee, 548.100 49-74^148-382 

Mike HIM, MU 80 48-7371-70—282 

Rocky Thomason, Ml ,700 45-78-7W3— 2SJ 


AFRICAN NATIONS CUP QUALIFY I NO 
Group One 

Lesotho X Ca m eroon 0 

Group TWO 

Mauritania l, Liberia 1 i 

Guinea Bissau 1. Sensual 4 
Tunisia I. Togo l 

Group Throe 
Gambia 1. Ghana 2 
Niger 4. Sierra Leone 2 


Egypt 5. Ethiopia o 
TaraoMs X Satan 0 
Uganda 1, Algeria 1 

Gratia Five 
Gabon 3, Mauritius 0 
Zambia 1. South Africa l 

Group Six 

Man a Angola 0 
WkaamtaMue X Guinea 1 
Namibia l, Botswana l 

Group sews 
Morocco 1. Ivory Coast 0 






Others mzidn waits: Syracuse 118. Air 
Farce 60, North CaroUmi SS. Illinois 49. Neva- 
(taKMroOemiaBaytorV.CeiTriWMfoW- 
aan 9, Washington Stats 7. Texas 5, Georgia 1, 
Tenne s see L 


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VIRGINIA SLIMS OF PHILADELPHIA 
Ftaol 

Aidw Huber Ul.Germonv.def. Mary Pierce 
(2j. France, M. 4-7 (4-71, 7-5. 

TOPPER OPEN 
la Baeoos Aires 

mm 

Alex Camilla (3), Spain, del. Jovttr Frona. 
Argentina. 4a 57. 74 [7-5). 


(Continued From Page 15) 


COLLEGE 

PURDUE— Suspended Corev Rogers, tnll- 
bock. <md Eric Gray, defensive end. tar am 
gome lor violating team rules. 

SAM DIEGO ST.— Named Fred Tronkle 
men's basketball coach. 

SE MISSOURt-figned John Mumtord, 1009- 
bail coach, to 3vear co ntract sxfenslea 

WEST VIRGINIA— Suspended Leon Ag- 
aew, center, from ba sk etball team indefinite- 
ly tor unidentified reasons. 

WISCONSIN S u spende d Brent Moss, senior 
toflbaAfiWfaclfaQllttoiTipend U toropilutlon 
of Ms mrost on cocaine pasmislen charge. 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1994 


ART BUCHWALD 


Reasoning Together 


W ASHINGTON — 1 am 
one of those people who 
believes that the tobacco com- 
panies should advertise in 
newspapers to gel their message 
of brotherhood across. The rea- 
son for this is that cigarette 
manufacturers are spending 
more money 
than Macy's in 
newspaper ad- 
vertising beg- 
ging smokers 
and nonsmok- 
ers to love each 
other. 

Their plea is 
to keep gov- 
ernment from 
regulating 
what we put in 
our mouths and to stop the po- 
lice from using tear gas when 
they discover cigarette smoke 
coming out of somebody’s win- 
dow. Their slogan is, “Together 
we can work it out,” The obvi- 
ous question is, “Are they out of 
their b linkin ' minds?” 

The tobacco companies' ap- 
peal just won't work. 1 was in a 
restaurant the other day in what 
is known in eating places as 



Bochwald 


'Natural Born Killers’ 
Gets Screening in U.K. 

Reuters 

LONDON — The film “Nat- 
ural Bom fvillers" was applaud- 
ed by an audience in London 
after what could be its oniy 
British screening. More than 
800 people packed a West End 
theater to see Oliver Stone’s tale 
of how a serial-killing couple go 
on a murderous rampage and 
are glorified by the media. 

The film has been linked to 
copycat killings in the United 
Stales and France and has yet 
to win British certification after 
the Board of Film Classifica- 
tion could not agree on a rating. 
The late-night screening on 
Sunday was part of the London 
Film Festival under a special 
temporary license. 


“no- man ’s land.” I was seated 
at one of the tables that adjoin 
the smoking section. 

A woman lit up a cigarette; 
and the person at the next table 
said, “would you mind putting 
that piece of filth out?” 

The smoker, who had been 
trained by someone from the 
Philip Morris School of Reme- 
dial Puffing, responded, “I have 
rights, too.” 

The nonsmoker said, “So do 
I. If you don't extinguish that 
cigarette right now, IH dump 
this tomato ketchup all over 
your nice white dress.” 

□ 

The husband of the smoker 
smiled and said, “Can't we 
work this out?” 

The husband of the non- 
smoker said, “What’s there to 
work out? Your wife is smoking 
and we're forced to inhale it. 
You have no right to make my 
wife ill when I'm paying $20 for 
her charcoal -grilled tuna." 

The smoking patron de- 
clared, “You nonsmokers are 
all alike. You don’t care about 
someone else’s pleasure. My 
husband and I worked all our 
lives so that we could afford 
Parliaments. Is there any other 
reason you don't want me to 
smoke besides the fact that it 
makes you sick?” 

“How about this? You seem 
like a very nice woman and I 
don't want you to die.” 

□ 

■ The smoker had tears in her 
eyes. “That’s what my children 
tell me, but they’re bring cor- 
rupted by their teachers. If 
smoking wasn't safe, tennis 
players wouldn't play in Virgin- 
ia Slims tournaments.' 1 

The smoker’s husband said, 
“Now you have Auriel all upset 
and she's shredded her charcoal 
filter. There is obviously no 
point in us reasoning together. 
The next lime we come here 
we’re going to bring a semiauto- 
matic weapon because the only 
thing that nonsmokers under- 
stand is force." 


Marcel Ophuls: Seeking Truth in an 



By Joan Dupont 

P ARIS — The apartment border- 
ing the Bois de Boulogne is spa- 
cious, spare of memorabilia — few. 
paintings, no Imickknack souvenirs. 
Marcel Ophuls, who has been living 
here, with interruptions, since the 
building went up in 1936, has spent 
his life examining layers of memory 
and consciousness, the shameful 
past, the uneasy present. He has pro- 
voked, manipulated or fascinated, 
depending on where you sit, but be 
Hag revolutionized the documentary 
from a droning, truth-telling form to 
a marathon event that mixes news 
clips, fiction and musical comedy. 

“People like Fred Wiseman, 
Claude i anymann and myself are 
aware that implicating ourselves in 
the film, making our choices known, 
and showing that we're part of the 
show-business tradition, means tell- 
ing a story, making people come alive 
on screen. To give audiences (he 
choice of agreeing or disagreeing 
with my views, I put myself on the 
screen, even though I know I'm not 
Cary Grant — too old, too bald — 
because it has to do with this very 
serious notion of game-playing.” 

In “The Sorrow and the Pity” 
(made in 1969 and released only in 
1971), set during the Occupation in 
the city of Clermont-Ferrand, 
Ophuls was offscreen. In his new film 
on journalism in wartime, “Veillees 
d’Armes” (“The Troubles We’ve 
Seen"), he makes an entrance don- 
ning a hat, “like Mitterrand, like Fel- 
lini, like all the great megalomani- 
acs," and goes off to join war 
correspondents at the Holiday Inn in 
Sarajevo. The two-part film, which 
opens next week in France, is about 
fake heroics, real heroes and villains 
in part of Europe that is slipping into 
oblivion. The huge cast of heroes 
includes John Bums of The New 
York Times, John Simpson of the 
BBC, Martine Laroche- Joubert of 
France 2, and the veteran correspon- 
dent Martha Gellhom, interviewed 
at her home in Wales, “because she is 
the link to the past, to the Second 
World War and the Spanish Civil 
War.” 

The son of Max Ophuls, the Ger- 
man-bom director of elegant films 
like “La Ronde," “Letter From an 


Unknown Woman” and “Lola Mon- 
tis,” Marcel Ophuls has developed 
his own ingenious style and an unor- 
thodox way of interviewing: He in- 
terrupts, laughs encouragingly, asks 
an insidious question, poker-faced. 
Now 67, an opinionated man with 
trenchant humor, he is not easy to 
pin down. 

Today, be gets up to make coffee, 
opens and shuts doors, flies to the 
phone; he points out that his Oscar, 
standing behind the door, was won 
not for “The Sorrow and the Pity” but 
for “Hotel Terminus,” his film about 
Klaus Barbie, and that the small lac- 
quered table where we sit was where 
his father held story conferences. 

He has forgotten about the coffee. 

“I’ve developed something that 
may seetn shocking for a documenta- 
ry filmmaker who is supposed to be 
preoccupied only with content, only 
with virtue, especially if he bandies 
epic tragic thanes with real people 
suffering and dying. But a filmmak- 
er, if he has any artistic ambition, has 
to become more interested in form 
than in content. Of course that 
sounds shocking in connection with 
Sarajevo; like many shocking things, 
it has to be faced.” 

The film begins with an excerpt 
from Max Ophuls’s “Mayerling to 
Sarajevo.” “My father was shooting 
the assassination of Archduke Franz 
Ferdinand in the south of France on 
the day the Second World War broke 
out, so this was a way to approach 
Sarajevo todav. I knew I wanted to 
get there at Christmas in the snow.” 

Marcel Ophuls arrives at the Holi- 
day Inn to the tune of Bing Crosby 
sing in g “White Christmas,” a guest 
appearance out of the past; the Marx 
brothers show up; Jimmy Cagney tap 
dancing and Laurence Olivieri 
“touch of Harry in the night” from 
“Henry V” counterpoint the d rama 
of the besieged city. “Some young 
people may not get the references; 
they may not make the emotional 
link to Sarajevo, the place where our 
culture is going to pot.” 

Although his films look tightly 
plotted, the director says that there is 
more improvisation than planning: 
“How can you predict what’s going 
to happen, and if you can, you 
shouldn't. I didn't choose any of my 



Marcel Ophuls with the BBC correspond eat John Simpson. 


characters, nobody was auditioned. 
People are interesting. if you just let 
than talk, if you let God be your co- 
pilot, chance meetings pay off. The 
real work is the story-lefling.’’ 

After shooting, he spent six months 
pulling the strands together, writing a 
complete, annotated script: “I would 
commit suicide if T had to watch 120 
hours of rushes,” he exclaims. 

There is enough material for an- 
other film on his shelves, but he 
wants togoback to Sarajevo because 
he hasn't been close enough to the 
bullets. “War correspondents are to- 
day’s resistance fighters and I don't 
think you can make a film about 
courage unless you’re there; you 
can’t be an armchair critic. Even at 
my advanced age. I've discovered the 
thrill Of adr enalin e flowing and the 
idea that we’re doing something 
against the cynicism of our times.” 

He blames the “democratization 
of cynicism" on television, rock cul- 
ture, and gurus like Roland Barthes, 


Michel Foucault and Jacques I.acnn. 
“pandering to the young, the arrested 
development people — instead of be- 
coming mature, these people became 
yuppies. We started with narcissism 
in '68 and now that pseudo-revolt has 
turned into complicity with the sys- 
tem.” 

The polemical and politically in- 
correct filmmaker, who studied phi- 
losophy at the Sorbonne, describes 
his role as that of an agent provoca- 
teur. “The Sorrow and the Pity," 
made for television, was banned for a 
decade on French TV. “When de 
Gaulle asked what the film was 
about, he was told it showed certain 
truths about resistance, collabora- 
tion and the French. The General 
said. Truths? But France needs 
hope, dignity and a future, not 
truths."’ Ophuls laughs, adding, 
“From the General’s point of view, 
he was probably right.” 

In 1981, all the French networks 
scrambled to get the documentary 


and get on the good side of the So- 
cialists. 

Although he voted Socialist 
Ophuls says he always distrusted 

Francois Mitterrand; he calls him, 
“the man whose cynicism has been 
contagious, whose acceptance of oth- 
er people's misery has led to murder 
ana mayhem and crime and geno- 
cide. His pro-Serb policy shows the 
same cynicism he has displayed to- 
ward the Jews.” 

Genocide is at the hidden heart of 
the film- In the Serb camp, a soldier 
says, “We’re not Arabs, we’re" not 
stupid,” and an officer asks Opting 
“Your name is Maned? like Proust? 
He was also a Jew." But the filmmak- 
er objects to portraying Jews as 
unique victims, railing against “vic- 
timization lobbies that provoke anti- 
Semitism.” 

“The gas chambers were unique, 
but is this a medal we’re going to pin 
on our chest forever? Survivors have 
a right to feel unique, but New York 
Jews who never got any closer than 
Rumpelmayer’s to the Warsaw ghet- 
to claim die uniqueness of their suf- 
fering!” 

Max Ophuls, who had escaped' 
Germany with his wife and son; be- 
came a French citizen in 1938. After 
the fall of France, they left the apan- 
ment near the Bois and went into 
hiding; with the hrip of the actor and 
director Louis Jouvet, they crossed 
into Switzerland. The family arrived 
in the United States in July 1941. , 

“My father was without work For 
four years. 1 went to Hollywood High. 
He made me take U.S. citizenship; he 
said, ‘Kiddo, Fm not financing yon 
bade to Europe because we don’t 
know what’s going to happen.'" 

Marcel is forever addicted to Holly- 
wood of the ’40s: Td rather see Lii- 
bitsch’s ‘Shop Around the Corner' for 
the 23d time than see a new I ranian ‘ 
picture. It’s lazy and it’s wrong." - 

On the Chicago film festival jury : 
recently, he saw films that crosscut 
between fiction and nonfiction the 
way his do. T discovered that we.all 
have the same preoccupation and 
deal with it formally in Lhe same way. 
Es liegt in der Lufi — it's in the air — 
my father would have said.” 

Joan Dupow is a Paris-based writer. 


WEATHER 


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T HE lady may be a 32. million-year-old 
fossil, but she still has what it takes to 
be the guest of honor at a black-tie dinner 
at the Metropolitan Club in New York. 
The Institute of Human Origins, which 
usually honors a living scientist at its annu- 
al benefit, is celebrating the 20th anniver- 
sary of the discovery of Lucy, the skeleton 
of one of man’s oldest ancestors. However, 
Lucy won’t be at the party. “She is resting 
in a wooden box in a safe in Addis Aba- 
ba," said Dr. Donald Johanson, one of the 
scientists who found her in Ethiopia in 
1974. 

□ 

A. M. Rosenthal, the former executive 
editor of The New York Times and a 
columnist for the newspaper, will receive 
the Light of Truth Award from the Inter- 
national Campaign for Tibet for his efforts 
to expose the plight of the Tibetan people. 

□ 

Princess Diana, 33. is coming out of 
semi-retirement with a vengeance. She was 
attending a reception Monday where Brit- 
ish Red Cross officials were to announce 
that she will head iheir fund-raising cam- 
paign for next year’s 125th anniversary of 


the organization. The high-profile charity 
role has been heralded as the end of the 
withdrawal from public life she declared 
suddenly last December, and comes amid 
media reports depicting her as lonely and 
unstable but determined to fight a hostile 
royal machine. However, a Buckingham 
Palace spokeswoman said the Red Cross 
role “should not be seen as a ‘comeback.’ " 
Coincidentally, or not so coincidentally, 
while she did her bit for the Red Cross, her 
estranged husband; Prince Gbarfes, was 
celebrating his 46th birthday. 

□ 

Alessandro Mussolini, 32, the grand- 
daughter of Benito Mussolini, is expecting 
her first child in July. Mussolini, a member 
of the Chamber of Deputies for the neofas- 
cist National Alliance party, said she 
planned to keep working. “It may slow me 
down some, but I really want to deal with it 
as if I were a man,” she said. She is married 
to Mauro FToriani, an officer of Italy’s tax 
police. 

□ 

Didier Van Canwetaert. 34, has won the 
Prix Gon court, France’s most prestigious 



AtHivr Sagsh/n/AFP 

Didier Van CauweJaert 


literary award, for “Un Aller simple” (One- 
Way Ticket), a poetic satire of France’s 
immigration laws. The prize carries a sym- 
bolic cash award of 50 francs ($9). Another 
literary prize, the Prix Renaudot, was given 
to GuObnme Le Touze, 26, for his novel 
“Comme ton pfcre” (Like Your Father). 



Without one, you can do it even faster 


ASIA /PACIFIC 


AUSTRALIA 

1800 - 881-811 

CHINA, PRC*** 

10811 

HONG KONG 

BOO -1111 

INDIA* . 

008-117 

INDONESIA* 

001 - 881-10 

JAPAN*. 

0039-111 

KOREA 

009-11 

Wifi . . 

... .TOUz-lll 

MALAYSIA' 

aao-ooii 


NEW .ZEALAND . . . UOQ-911 

PHILIPPINES* 105 - 1 ! 

RUSSIA* ({MOSCOW) 155-5842 
SAIPAN? . . .235-2872 

SINGAPORE . 8/0-0111-111 

SR LANKA 430-UTI 

TAIWAN 1 . .. 6088 - 10288-0 

LHAIAHO* . OOIr/901-MII 
EUROPE 

ARMENIA 1 ! 1*14111 


AUSTRIA -m . ,022-403-011 

BOGHW . 0-880-108-10 
BULGARIA 00-1000-0010 

PWAi m* . . 99-38-8011 

CZECH REPUBLIC 09-420-0810] 
kmwww* . . 6001 -emo 

FINLAND" .9880-108-10 

FRANCE . 19C-O011 

GERMANY. . 8138-0010 

GREECE' . 00 -BOO -1311 


HUNGARY' 00 0-880-01 111 

ICELAND - .. . . . .899-081 
IRELAND 1-880-558 -808 

ITALY' 172-1011 

UECHTEHSTEM- .. IB-00-11 
LITHUANIA* 8v196 

LUXEMBOURG . 

MALTA 1889-898-118 

Monaco- w-wm 

NETHERLANDS' 06-022-9111 


NORWAY 

.aaMOB-ii 

P 0 LAN 0 I*- 

O'. 01 0 - 480-01 11 

PORTUGAL' 

05817 - 1 -ZBB 

R 0 MAMA 

01 - 889-4288 

SLOVAK REP. 

00 - 420-80101 

SPAM. 

980 - 90 - 00-11 

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020 - 795-811 

SWITZERLAND* 

155 - 00-11 

UKRAINE 1 

8 -.- 100-11 

U.K. 

0500 - 89-0011 


MIDDLE EAST 


ftiHRWN 

BUfmiOl 

CVPHirj- 

len-woio 

EGYPT' (CAIRO)* 

. 510-0200 

ISRAEL 

177 - 100-2727 

Hi //All 


LEBANON (BETRUT] 

|* 428-801 

i/HJtU ARABIA 

i-diki-ii; 

TURKEY* 

00 - 800.12277 

1 ) ARAB EMKArES* 

WO- 72 ! 


AMERICAS 


AfllVEFinilA* 

mi-diUKiiu-iiii 

BOLIVIA* 

H-HIA> 1 I 1 J 

BRAZIL 

000-8010 

CAtJAllA 

1 HiUFS/h LC 23 

CHILE 

08--0312 

COLOMBIA 

980 - 11-0010 

EL SALVADOR *■ 

. 190 

HONDURAS!. 

123 

ME.lir. 0 -*'- 



PANAMA. 

109 

FEfiU» 

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VENEZUELA'. 

80 - 811 - 121 ) 

AFRICA 

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00-081 

GAMBIA- 

Will 

IVORY COAST* 

00 - 111-11 

ftU'.AI 

HSJJ,'. 1 . 

LIBERIA 

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SOUTH AFRICA 

0 - 800 - 99-0123 


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